Nathan Day
nday@latinpcs.org
608 217-8534 (cell)
Unless otherwise noted, homework assignments are typically worth 10 points.

I RESERVE THE RIGHT TO STOP WORKING WITH STUDENTS SHORTLY AFTER 4 PM IF I FEEL THE NEED TO DO SO.

Due 9/25
AP: read and annotate "Politics and the English Language"; do your best to respond in writing to the reading questions

Due 9/22
HEX: on Friday we will have small group discussions about the power of words as we can see it in The Book Thief. Do some thinking and take some notes (you're on your honor here; I will not be checking them); compose questions that you think will be good for sparking discussion on Friday

AP: see HW due 9/25

English 11 Gamma: Finish today's grammar exercise (15 class work points); Choice Writing #4 (as you're writing, start to think about what you can do as a writer that will make whatever it is you're writing better than it might otherwise be) (up to 20 HW points)

English 11 Epsilon: Choice Writing #4 (as you're writing, start to think about what you can do as a writer that will make whatever it is you're writing better than it might otherwise be) (up to 20 HW points)

Due 9/21
AP: Essay revision due Thursday; first tutorial meeting score will be set to zero points on Friday if it has not happened by then; keep thinking about the things we've been thinking about (we'll talk about Syme and Newspeak and maybe the manipulation of history on Thursday)

English 11 Gamma: no HW; thank you for your hard work today -- remember to come in during Tutorial or pick up your re-assessment during study hall if you need more time to work

English 11 Epsilon: Choice Writing #4 (as you're writing, start to think about what you can do as a writer that will make whatever it is you're writing better than it might otherwise be) (up to 20 HW points)

Due 9/20
HEX: review pp. 262-264 -- contemplate what we are being told here about the power of words; first tutorial meeting score will be set to zero points on Friday if it has not happened by then; compose a paragraph that summarizes and explains the allegorical meaning of "The Word Shaker" -- including the ending! (10 HW points; write in the reading section of your notebook -- will be checked tomorrow but not collected).

English 11 Epsilon: no new homework; remember to come in to finish your Kindred "re-assessment" if you did not complete it today; BRING YOUR IR BOOK TO CLASS TOMORROW!

English 11 Gamma: prepare for Kindred "re-assessment" (up to 50 major assignment points).
1. Come to class ready to write about one quotation that you think is crucial for understanding the book and was not on the initial assessment
2. Here are questions suggested by students, which will form the basis of all but one of the open-response questions:
Does Rufus love Alice?
What are Rufus' feelings towards Alice?
How is Rufus conflicted about Dana?
When is it okay to kill someone?
Whom does Rufus love more, Alice or Dana?
How do Rufus' actions contradict his feelings?
How do Dana's feelings towards Rufus change over time?
Explain Rufus' relationship with Alice; explain Rufus' relationship with Dana -- in what ways are these relationships similar and different?
Why does Rufus say Dana and Alice are the same person?
Why did Rufus feel like he could get away with the things he did to Alice and Dana?
How do Rufus' feelings affect his relationships with Alice and Dana?
At what point in the story do we see Rufus changing, and what is he changing into?
Was it right for Dana to kill Rufus?
Why did Rufus always have a different attitude toward Dana than all the other black people we see?
How does Rufus show that he has authority over Dana, and how does he show that he doesn't?
Is Dana obligated to help Rufus every time she flashes back?
Was it okay for Alice to kill herself?
How does Rufus perceive Alice?
How does the time period and location affect Rufus' thinking as he grows older?
Is Rufus obligated to help Dana?
Which Rufus a part of Dana's heritage, why would she not want him dead after Hagar was born?
If you're not born with hate, why does Rufus question everything about Dana?
To prepare for the test, prepare to respond to the questions you think are most important for understanding the book, and most important to our conversations about the book. Make notes that will help you remember your thinking (you may use your book, but not your notes, on the assessment).

Due 9/19
HEX:
1. Re-read pp. 262-264, 444-451 -- contemplate what we are being told about the power of words
2. Summarize today's conversation in a paragraph -- explain what we have said about the symbolism of the book The Standover Man

AP: Essay revision due Thursday

English 11 Epsilon: prepare for Kindred "re-assessment" (up to 50 major assignment points).
1. Come to class ready to write about one quotation that you think is crucial for understanding the book and was not on the initial assessment
2. Here are questions suggested by students, which will form the basis of all but one of the open-response questions:
Does Rufus love Alice?
What are Rufus' feelings towards Alice?
How is Rufus conflicted about Dana?
When is it okay to kill someone?
Whom does Rufus love more, Alice or Dana?
How do Rufus' actions contradict his feelings?
How do Dana's feelings towards Rufus change over time?
Explain Rufus' relationship with Alice; explain Rufus' relationship with Dana -- in what ways are these relationships similar and different?
Why does Rufus say Dana and Alice are the same person?
Why did Rufus feel like he could get away with the things he did to Alice and Dana?
How do Rufus' feelings affect his relationships with Alice and Dana?
At what point in the story do we see Rufus changing, and what is he changing into?
Was it right for Dana to kill Rufus?
Why did Rufus always have a different attitude toward Dana than all the other black people we see?
How does Rufus show that he has authority over Dana, and how does he show that he doesn't?
Is Dana obligated to help Rufus every time she flashes back?
Was it okay for Alice to kill herself?
How does Rufus perceive Alice?
How does the time period and location affect Rufus' thinking as he grows older?
Is Rufus obligated to help Dana?
Which Rufus a part of Dana's heritage, why would she not want him dead after Hagar was born?
If you're not born with hate, why does Rufus question everything about Dana?
To prepare for the test, prepare to respond to the questions you think are most important for understanding the book, and most important to our conversations about the book. Make notes that will help you remember your thinking (you may use your book, but not your notes, on the assessment).

Due 9/18
English 11 students: as you were notified earlier this week, scores of 0 have been entered for the first tutorial meeting of the quarter, if you have not yet come to tutorial

AP and HEX students: scores of 0 will be entered for the first tutorial meeting of the quarter at the end of next week for those who have yet to come to tutorial by then

AP: Compose a written outline of your most recent argumentative essay (10 HW points); come to class on Monday prepared to discuss the importance of words and language in 1984.

HEX: Compose a 2-paragraph reflection on today's conversation -- 1) Summarize today's discussion; 2) select 1 issue, question, or idea and explore it further on your own (20 HW points)

English 11: Compose Choice Writing piece (#3) (up to 20 HW points); review your Reading Notes from the past couple of weeks -- what issues, themes, and questions have been most important for us in our conversations about Kindred?

Due 9/15
HEX: review pp. 301-403 in The Book Thief. Compose one paragraph using these pages to explore one of the issues that came up in discussion today (10 HW points + 10 HW points for your discussion-planning notes for 9/13)

English 11 Epsilon and Gamma: Review the last two chapters of Kindred.

AP: Compose one paragraph of summary of today's discussion, and a second paragraph exploring further an issue of your choice from today's discussion (20 HW points).

Due 9/14
AP: Make an initial contribution to the Googledoc you received a link to today (What should we talk about, and why?). After most everyone has made their first contribution, make a second one, adding more substance to your thoughts, or others' -- add text references and ideas; prepare for discussion

English 11 Gamma: Typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, and proofread MLA format final draft of "I'm here because..." personal essay ( up to 30 major assignment points) (rough draft was due Monday, 9/11); bring IR book tomorrow

Due 9/13
English 11 Gamma:
1. Typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, and proofread MLA format final draft of "I'm here because..." personal essay ( up to 30 major assignment points) (rough draft was due Monday, 9/11)
2. Choice Writing #2
3. review pp. 100-167 of Kindred

English 11 Epsilon:
1. Typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, and proofread MLA format final draft of "I'm here because..." personal essay ( up to 30 major assignment points) (rough draft was due Monday, 9/11)
2. Think about the feelings of love, and power/control/entitlement. In what ways do they fit together? In what ways are they opposed?
3. Remember that your first tutorial meeting score will be set to zero at the end of the week.
4. PLEASE REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR INDEPENDENT READING BOOK TOMORROW!

HEX:
Prepare for Book Thief discussion activity tomorrow -- come to class with a sheet of paper on which you have mades notes and written page references for the following topics (in no particular order) (10 HW points):
-- The actions parents will take to protect their children
-- Death
-- The importance of books
-- The power of words and propaganda
-- Max writes 2 books for Liesel, "The Standover Man" and "The Word Shaker"

Due 9/12
English 11 Epsilon:
1. Typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, and proofread MLA format final draft of "I'm here because..." personal essay ( up to 30 major assignment points) (rough draft was due Monday, 9/11)
2. Choice Writing #2
3. review pp. 100-167 of Kindred

HEX: Revised, typed, double-spaced, MLA format (including citations and Works Cited entry!) second draft of Book Thief Figurative Language Analysis Paragraph — due at the start of class, stapled in this order: rubric, second draft, peer conference sheet, rough draft, graphic organizer

AP: Look back to your warm-up from last Thursday -- What's 1984 about (plot and characters)? What's 1984 really about (themes and issues)? Which of these are most worth investigating, and why? Think about your answers to these questions, and think about the importance of words, language, and rhetoric in this book. Come in with textual references to point us to (include page numbers!) to help us think about these things together


Due 9/11
English 11 Epsilon and Gamma: bring rough draft of "I'm here because..." essay to class ON PAPER (peer conferences in class on Monday)

HEX: Rough draft of Figurative Language Analysis Paragraph

AP: Prepare for Test-Like Artifact on 1984. Use your notes from today's class to help you. Remember that you will need to bring in three quotations (can be dialogue or narration) that you think are crucial for understanding this text. Be ready to explain whose voice this is, who the audience is, the context -- what is going on at this point in the story, the meaning of the quotation, and the significance of this quotation for the text overall and your understanding of it.

Due 9/8
HEX: review through p. 303 in The Book Thief -- as you skim, annotate and mark pages for elements, themes, and events we are collectively interested in exploring; select a passage from anywhere in the book for your own Figurative Language Analysis Paragraph (passage must be no more than one page long) -- on Friday in class, you will work to complete for your own chosen passage the graphic organizer we worked on for the sample paragraph today (on Friday, you will use the blank version of the graphic organizer -- it's printed on both sides to give you extra room if you need it)

English 11, both sections: see HW for 9/12 and 9/13 (you don't have the essay prompt yet, but you can start re-reading Kindred or even work on your choice writing)

AP: Do what review, annotation, and note-taking you think will help you prepare for tomorrow's conversations. Remember, you will be meeting in small groups to discuss
1. themes and deeper issues in 1984 -- how you can tell what they are, what the text has to say about them, what significant moments are connected to them,
2. the importance of words, language, and rhetoric and the ways they are used in 1984
3. based on your responses for #1 and #2, what questions you think may be on the test-like artifact on Monday

Due 9/7
AP: Essay revisions due 9/19; keep bringing 1984; please check this space tomorrow to see if there's anything to read before class on Thursday

English 11 Gamma: Research page numbers to refer to in order to help us think about these two questions: What are Rufus' attitudes towards other characters? How are they affected by his understanding of race?


Due 9/6
English 11 Gamma: Pay attention to Rufus in "The Fire" and "The Fall" (pp. 20-99). What are his attitudes towards other characters? How are his attitudes towards different people affected by his understanding of race? -- be prepared to write about and discuss these questions in class (read, annotate, take notes).

English 11 Epsilon: Research page numbers to refer to in order to help us think about these two questions: What are Rufus' attitudes towards other characters? How are they affected by his understanding of race?

HEX: compose "I Hear My Neighborhood Singing" poem; review through p. 170 in The Book Thief (yes, it's a lot; you have got to skim)

Due 9/5
English 11 Epsilon: Pay attention to Rufus in "The Fire" and "The Fall" (pp. 20-99). What are his attitudes towards other characters? How are his attitudes towards different people affected by his understanding of race? -- be prepared to write about and discuss these questions in class (read, annotate, take notes).

HEX: review pp. 1-80 of The Book Thief.

AP: Please start bringing 1984 to class, though I'm not sure if we'll start it on Tuesday or not. For written work -- Summarize our conversations about this book about the Gettysburg Address: How has your thinking about and understanding of this text (and of the Gettysburg Address itself) changed and developed as a result of our conversations? Here’s how your work will be graded:
  • 5 points: Not all parts of the assignment have been completed.
  • 10 points: All parts of the assignment have been completed, but not in a very thorough or detailed way.
  • 15 points: All parts of the assignment have been completed, and some details and explanation are present – someone looking at this can get an adequate sense of the writer’s ideas
  • 17.5 points: The assignment is complete, and includes a significant number of details and explanation – someone looking at this can get a strong, clear sense of the writer’s ideas
  • 20 points: The assignment is complete, and includes many details and thorough explanations – someone looking at this gets a truly clear and precise sense of the writer’s sophisticated ideas

Due 9/1
HEX: Compose a 3-paragraph reflection on your discussion today -- 1. summarize your conversation; 2. Evaluate your conversation as a discussion (what went well, what could have gone better, what could you collectively have done to make things go better in a future discussion?); 3. Select one idea from your conversation and develop, explore, or expand upon it further on your own (15 HW points).

English 11 Epsilon and Gamma: Choice Writing #1 -- read your directions handout, and contact me with any questions you might have; in Kindred, pay attention to Rufus in "The Fire" (pp. 20-57). What are his attitudes towards other people? Are they affected by his understanding of race? (If so, how?)

AP: Read the Wikipedia entry on the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (not to be confused with the Civil Rights Act of 1964); here is a brief article on History.com whose 90-second video might serve as a useful intro to the Wikipedia article (but in no way replaces it). Then, read and annotate the 4 articles (sorry, not 3) you received at the end of class today. The first 3 are news articles; the 4th is an opinion piece (an argument). We are reading these in anticipation of their being relevant if and when our conversation turns to the topic of Reconstruction ("But Reconstruction was in the late 1860s-1870s... why are we reading about a piece of legislation from 1965 and a court case from 2013?").

Due 8/31
AP: Discussion reflection -- 1. Compose a paragraph assessing the quality of today's conversation? 2. Compose a paragraph further exploring or discussing an issue or idea that intrigues you from today's conversation; 3. Write 1-3 sentences suggesting what we might talk about at our next meeting, based on today's conversation (10 HW points) (by the way, I will likely collect all of your discussion preparation and reflections together)

English 11 Gamma: Write a thoughtful, 1/2-page response to this question: When are we obligated to help people who act mean? (You may think about Al Letson, his choices, and our conversation today; about events in Kindred; about life in general, or any combination of these) (10 HW points)

Due 8/30
English 11 Gamma: Review pp. 6-57 of Kindred ("Prologue," "The River," "The Fire"); please make sure you have both of your notebooks tomorrow (10 HW points)

English 11 Epsilon: Write a thoughtful, 1/2-page SINGLE-SPACED response to today's question -- "When are we obligated to help people who act mean?" -- and our conversation today (10 HW points for thoughtful completion); Pay attention to Rufus in "The Fire" (pp. 20-57). What are his attitudes towards other people? Are they affected by his understanding of race? (If so, how?)

HEX: Write a thoughtful, 1/2-page SINGLE SPACED response to our conversation today (10 HW points for thoughtful completion) -- you can take this in any of several directions: discuss why you agree or disagree with the thesis your group worked with (or the thesis your group didn't work with), investigate the issue of identity for Junior in particular or in general (to what extent is who we are determined by our context and situation? to what extent do we determine it ourselves? to what extent is it determined by others around us?)... lots of options here. Please bring both The Absolutely True Diary... and The Book Thief on Wednesday.

Due 8/29
AP: Discussion reflection -- 1. Compose a paragraph summarizing today's conversation; 2. Compose a paragraph further exploring or discussing an issue or idea that intrigues you from today's conversation; 3. Write 1-3 sentences suggesting what we might talk about at our next meeting, based on today's conversation. (20 HW points for thoughtful completion)

HEX: Review The Absolutely True Diary... for our critical thinking exercise: what research and note-taking do you each need to do for your group to finish in class tomorrow?

English 11 Epsilon: Review pp. 6-57 of Kindred ("Prologue," "The River," "The Fire"); please make sure you have both of your notebooks tomorrow (10 HW points)

Due 8/28
ALL CLASSES: BRING THE MATERIALS YOU NEED FOR CLASS (WE WILL SET UP NOTEBOOKS IN CLASS ON MONDAY)

English 11: prepare for Monday's test on Kindred (time-limited, open book, open note)
Materials-wise, you will receive 10 HW points for bringing your composition notebook (for warm-ups) and your additional notebook (for taking notes) to class on Monday. There are some composition notebooks -- all empty, some but not all brand new -- in the faculty room. If you would like one of these (or two -- your second notebook can be a composition book also), please email me and I will bring it to class for you on Monday.

HEX: 1st essay due (30 major assignment points) -- I would prefer that you type, double-space, and use MLA format; if typing is not possible, please double-space your writing. Either way, please edit and proofread your work prior to coming to class, and bring the prompt and rubric you received today. Please remember that if you are late to class on Monday, your essay is also late. ALSO, PLEASE BRING YOUR COPY OF THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY... to class on Monday.
Materials-wise, you will receive 10 HW points for bringing your composition notebook (for warm-ups) and your additional notebook (for taking notes) to class on Monday. There are some composition notebooks -- all empty, some but not all brand new -- in the faculty room. If you would like one of these (or two -- your second notebook can be a composition book also), please email me and I will bring it to class for you on Monday.

AP: prepare for discussion on selected topics from our graphic novel about the Gettysburg Address -- please make written notes and page references as preparation (10 HW points). Topics, as written on our board:
--the Union winning the war and being determined to give the South harsh punishment because of interpretation of the Constitution when it had to be changed to [illegible] issues. Was it right to harshly punish the South?
--Lincoln and his ideas about race and slavery
--Tension between the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution
--Environmental and economic factors influencing slave and free labor
--Leaders of this country taking too long to intervene in the system of slavery -- passing blame for the situation like a baton and waiting for the issue to resolve itself instead of stepping in
Materials-wise, you will receive 10 HW points for having a binder, dividers, and loose leaf paper in addition to your book, writing tool, and HW.

Due 8/25
English 11: review (or read, if you haven't yet) Kindred, and BRING IT TO CLASS TOMORROW (test Monday)

HEX: View Crash Course: Literature #1, "How and Why We Read" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSYw502dJNY); complete the "Why Should We Read Literature?" assignment (it's fine to write on the back of the handout sheet) (10 HW points)

AP: research potential topics for discussion in the Gettysburg Address graphic novel -- find page numbers to connect to topics, for starters

Due 8/24
English 11: review (or read, if you haven't yet) Kindred, and BRING IT TO CLASS TOMORROW; complete the course contract to submit at the start of class (10 HW points)

HEX: review and bring The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian; complete the course contract to submit at the start of class (10 HW points)

AP: review our graphic novel on the Gettysburg Address -- bring it to class tomorrow, along with your ability to talk about what you find interesting or worth talking about in this text; complete the complete the course contract to submit at the start of class (10 HW points)





ENGLISH 11 STUDENTS: FEEL FREE TO USE CHAPTER SUMMARIES ON SHMOOP.COM OR SPARKNOTES.COM TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT'S GOING ON IN SONG OF SOLOMON (BE WARNED, THOUGH: USING THE SUMMARIES AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR READING WILL PROBABLY NOT WORK OUT IN THE LONG RUN)

Due 6/1
HEX, English 11 (both classes): prepare for your final exam

AP: finish your final projects as soon as reasonably possible

Due 5/30
English 11, both classes: see Exam Review Guide (note that if you are caught up in your work, you will have completed SDE 26 for Tuesday, but note that's not the only thing you'll need to have done); did you turn in your Q4 warm-ups?

HEX: Complete SDE 26, write out 15 Odyssey quotatons that you think may appear on the final exam (To help you choose quotes: Which parts of these stories are most important for us? What things do people say that express their significance?) (20 HW points); bring your warm-ups to submit on Tuesday

AP: Q4 warm-ups due Tuesday; continue work on your final project

Due 5/26
HEX: Write out 10 significant Hebrew Bible quotes that you think may appear on the final exam (To help you choose quotes: Which parts of these stories are most important for us? What things do people say that express their significance?) (20 HW points); Complete the class work side of SDE 26; begin planning your Character Dialogue essay; bring your warm-ups to submit tomorrow

English 11, both classes: bring your warm-ups to submit tomorrow; see Final Exam Review Guide for further HW

English 11 Delta: Vocab Quiz 8 tomorrow

AP: continue work on your final project -- email me with a proposal ASAP if you have not yet! Q4 warm-ups due either tomorrow or Tuesday

Due 5/25
HEX: DBQ due tomorrow, officially; bring your Odyssey book to turn in tomorrow; complete the class work side of SDE 25

AP: work on your final project

English 11: see exam study guide

Due 5/24
AP: Work on your final project; review the "Freedom" and "Svaha!" chapters of Heart of Understanding; email me a proposal if you have not done so already

HEX: Continue work on your Lady Macbeth DBQ (due Thursday). Review your notes and annotations from The Book Thief, and then select and write out, with page numbers, 5 quotations that you think provide significant insight into the plot, themes, or characters of the book. (Also be thinking about the Character Dialogue essay!) BRING YOUR COPY OF THE BOOK THIEF TO CLASS TOMORROW!

English 11:
1. Look back over Song of Solomon -- the text, and your notes -- and consider what the most important moments and events in the text
are. Find and write out, with page numbers, ten quotations that you think illustrate something significant about a major character or theme
in the book -- ten quotations you think might appear on the final exam Quote ID, in other words. (20 HW points)
2. Complete Song of Solomon annotations through Chapter 10, if you have not already (books due tomorrow)
3. Inform Mr. Day if you need another copy of the full vocabulary list.
4. Study Vocab List 8; Study all vocabulary
5. Have you turned in the Reading Guide for Ch. 10 yet?

Due 5/23
AP: read and annotate "Freedom" and "Svaha!" in The Heart of Understanding; send me an email describing what you might like to do for a final project (if you're not sure yet, that's okay -- just let me know what you're thinking about; if you plan to write about The Heart of Understanding or They Live, I will write a prompt for you).

HEX: What sources for the DBQ are you going to refer to in your writing, and how are you going to use them? (figure this out)
Which quotations from the text of the play are most important for you for...
1. the DBQ project
2. your understanding of the play and characters overall?
CONSTRUCT A LIST OF 10 QUOTES, WRITTEN OUT (AT LEAST IN PART), WITH ACT, SCENE, AND LINE NUMBERS (20 HW POINTS)

English 11 Gamma and Delta: Read the rest of Ch. 12 if we did not finish in class today. SKIP CH. 13 AND READ CH. 14 (AND CAN YOU GET INTO 15?) INSTEAD

Due 5/22
AP: Read and annotate the next three chapters of The Heart of Understanding. If you have an idea for what you would like to do for a final project, please write to me about it. I will try to have some suggestions and ideas for you on Monday.

English 11 Gamma: Read and annotate the rest of Ch. 10; complete the question-asking activity in your reading guide (bring your questions to class on Monday). READ, BUT IT'S OKAY NOT TO ANNOTATE, all of Ch. 11. Yes, this is a lot of work, but we missed a full day of class.

English 11 Delta: READ, BUT IT'S OKAY NOT TO ANNOTATE, all of Ch. 11.

HEX: Read, look at, and listen to the sources below -- on Monday, I will ask you to think about how to cast and portray Lady Macbeth. To what extent should we see her as a sympathetic character, for seeking power however she can in a male-dominated society? To what extent should we view her critically, for her stereotypical notions of what it means to be a man (and to be a woman?), and her murderous ambition? To what extent should she be stereotypically feminine? To what extent stereotypically masculine? To what extent not fitting gender stereotypes at all?

1. Image of Sarah Bernhardt (famous late 19th-century French actress) as Lady Macbeth
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2. Video clip: Lady Macbeth (Judi Dench) encourages Macbeth (Ian McKellen) to Murder Dundan (video)

3. CliffsNotes: How does Shakespeare play with gender roles in Macbeth? (web page)

4.Image of Nikkole Salter as Lady Macbeth and JJ Perez as Macbeth in Shakespeare Theatre Company's 2017 production
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5. WAMU's Kojo Nnamdi interviews Nikkole Salter (Lady Macbeth in STC's 2017 production): Go to https://thekojonnamdishow.org/shows/2017-05-15/lady-macbeth-is-a-howard-alumna-a-conversation-with-actress-nikkole-salter-and-theatre-legend-vera-katz, and click on "Listen". Skip to minutes 3:30-4:30 for Salter's comments on Lady Macbeth and gender roles.

6. Image of Hillary Clinton in front of an American flag
2016-10-10-1476135120-8225852-Hillary1-thumb.jpg

7. Image of Sarah Palin (former governor of Alaska and Republican vice-presidential candidate): Sarah Palin

8. "Ellen Terry as Lady Macbeth" -- painting of actress Ellen Terry by John Singer Sargent: "Ellen Terry as Lady Macbeth," by John Singer Sargent (painting)

9. Image of Beyonce with quote -- Power is not given to you. You have to take it." https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/52/2f/54/522f54a1d2e89b3e05c6827337a4388d.jpg

Due 5/19
AP: Read and annotate "Roses and Garbage," the next chapter of The Heart of Understanding

HEX: Write out a list of 20 aspects of the production of Macbeth that we saw today that differed from how you imagined they would be (these can be a mix of specific details and broad generalizations; feel free to think about set, costumes, lighting, and overall conception in addition to speaking, movement, acting, and casting) (20 HW points). If you will be in class tomorrow, please also review Lady Macbeth's major speeches in Acts I and II.

English 11 Delta: read and annotate the rest of Ch. 10; complete the question-asking activity in your reading guide (bring your questions to our next class)

Due 5/17
This is my monthly wiki screw-up

Due 5/16
English 11 Gamma: read and annotate through p. 239 of Song of Solomon

English 11 Delta: read and annotate through p. 244 of Song of Solomon (you will have the opportunity to turn in SDE 25 and the written homework from the weekend tomorrow as well)

HEX: Review 2.3-4 of Macbeth; read, at the very least, the scene summaries of Act 3 (read as much of Act 3 as you can)

Due 5/15
HEX: SDE 24 (both sides)

English 11 Gamma and Delta: SDE 25 (if you have not completed it and turned it in already)

English 11 Gamma: Read and annotate the rest of Ch. 9 of Song of Solomon if you have not already, and answer the following questions on a sheet of paper:

1. How does Pilate transform herself at the police station?*

2. Why does this upset Guitar so much?

3. What continues to bother Milkman about Guitar?

4. What does Milkman’s life look like from his sister’s perspective?

5. *And of all the strange things in this book, which ones seem to be actually magical, which ones seem to be maybe-sort-of magical, and which ones are not magical?


Value: up to 20 Class Work points -- 5 for minimal completion, 10 for partial completion, 15 for completion with some detail and explanation, 17.5 for completion with significant detail and explanation, 20 for completion with thorough detail and explanation

Due 5/12
HEX: Revised, typed, edited, proofread, double-spaced MLA format final draft of essay (60 major assignment points)

AP: REad and annotate the next chapter of The Heart of Understanding ("Happy Continuation")

English 11 Delta: study for tomorrow's quiz, complete the vocab review exercise you received at the end of class today (SDE 25 due Monday)


Due 5/11
AP: Bask in your glory (hopefully the exam went well) and I'll see you tomorrow.

English 11 Delta: see yesterday's English 11 Gamma HW

English 11 Gamma: study for tomorrow's vocab quiz

Due 5/10
HEX: Read and annotate 1.5-1.7 of Macbeth. Revised, typed, double-spaced second draft due Tuesday (40 HW points)

AP: Get good rest tonight. If you want to do any exam prep, either do positive visualizations OR think about the things that have been the biggest challenges for you in our exam preparation, and plan for how you will deal with them if they come up again tomorrow. Be at the Plymouth Church (the back side door with stairs) at 7:45 am tomorrow -- 5301 North Capitol St NE

English 11 Gamma: study your vocabulary; read and annotate ONLY pp. 202-216 of Ch. 9 of Song of Solomon; COME TO CLASS TOMORROW PREPARED TO LEAVE YOUR BOOKS BEHIND FOR AN ANNOTATION CHECK OF CH. 5-8!
Narrative Assistance for Ch. 9
p. 202
What is Macon upset about?
What happened to Guitar and Milkman after they stole the sack from Pilate's house?
What does Macon say was the cause of this?
What does Milkman say was the cause of this? (What was in the sack?)
What is at least one of the nasty names Macon calls Guitar?
What other crime has been committed that has made people nervous? (And who can we and Milkman surmise was involved?)
Who helped get Milkman and Guitar out of jail, besides Macon and his money?
p. 204 (bottom)
What does Milkman think is so funny?
How did Pilate act and look in the police station? How did she transform?
What story did she tell the police about the bag of bones?
p. 208
Why did Pilate keep the old man's bones, according to her? (Who told her to retrieve them, and why?)
What word does Pilate and Macon's father keep telling her, in her story?
p. 209
What are the things that are bothering Milkman right now?
How does Guitar feel about Pilate? (No, we don't really know why.)
Who does Milkman see as he walks to Guitar's house? What does he realize?
p. 211
Why is Lena angry with Milkman?
"...there are all kinds of ways to pee on people" (214). What are the different ways Lena says Milkman has been peeing on her and Corinthians?
How does she describe how their life has been with him in the family's house?
"Where do you get the right to decide our lives?" According to Lena, what is the literal answer to this question?
What did Macon do when he found out that Porter and Corinthians had been seeing each other?
What does Lena say Milkman's hitting their father was really about? (Hint: not protecting their mother)
How does Lena say Macon had treated her and Corinthians?

English 11 Delta: read and annotate Ch. 8 of Song of Solomon (see Gamma period HW below for narrative assistance); vocab quiz Friday (Delta)

Due 5/9
AP: Get enough sleep tonight. I'm not kidding.

HEX: Read and annotate 1.1-1.4 of the Scottish play (revised, typed second draft of Odysseus essay due Wednesday)

English 11 Gamma: read and annotate Ch. 8 of Song of Solomon (see below for narrative assistance); vocab quiz Thursday (Gamma) or Friday (Delta)
Narrative Assistance
P. 173
What historical Sunday event does Guitar have on his mind? What does this mean he has to do?
What does Milkman tell Guitar about?
What do they plan to do together?
Why does Guitar think this will be easy, and why does Milkman think it will be hard?
P. 179
"All that jewelry weighs it down. Like vanity. Can't nobody fly with all that shit. Wanna fly, you got to give up the shit that weighs you down."
What are Guitar and Milkman chasing when Guitar says this?
How would you interpret this figuratively? What are the things that weigh Milkman down that keep him from flying?
What are some of the things that Guitar and Milkman say they will buy with the money from the gold?
Milkman has trouble truly visualizing a life with all the money they expect to get from the gold -- how come? (pay attention to pp. 179-180)
What is Guitar really thinking about buying with part of his share of the money from the gold? (see p. 181)
Why is Milkman worried things will go wrong, and why is Guitar sure that the theft will be easy?
When they steal it, what is different about the green bag than what Milkman and Guitar had expected?
Who knows that they've stolen the bag, and what does she say to herself about this?

Due 5/8
AP: Finish our current multiple choice question packet

HEX: complete essay rough draft (see prompt, see below) (40 HW points)

English 11 Gamma and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 7 of Song of Solomon (see narrative assistance questions below); complete SDE 24 (if you have not done so already); complete Ch. 6 Reading Guide (if you have not done so already) -- all of these are due on Monday, May 8
Narrative Assistance for Ch. 7
P. 162
How does Macon define freedom? Why would he think so?
Why does Milkman want to leave home?
What detail about Pilate's house does Macon fixate on?
Does it strike you as a little weird that Milkman is 31 and still calls Macon "Daddy"? How is connected to other things we've seen and said about Milkman so far?
P. 164
"Everything they [other people] did seemed to be about him, yet nothing he wanted was part of it" (165). Please explain what Milkman means, and why he feels this way.
At the bottom of p. 165, Macon begins telling the story of what happened after his and Pilate's father was killed.
--How does Circe help them?
--Why and how does Pilate make her unusual earring?
--Why do they leave Circe?
--Who do they keep thinking they see as they walk south towards Virginia?
--What shelter does this person lead them to?
--Who does Macon find the next morning?
P. 169 (bottom)
--What do Macon and Pilate do to this person? Why do they do this?
--What do they then find?
--What word does the vision of their father say before he disappears?
--What does Macon want to do next, and why?
--What does Pilate want to do next, and why?
--How does their fight end? What happens next?
The flashback ends at the bottom of p. 171.
P. 172
What does Macon now think has happened to the gold?
What does he ask Milkman to do before he leaves home, and what does he offer Milkman in exchange for this?

Due 5/5
HEX: Remember that a rough draft of your essay is due Monday (40 HW points). Here are some sentence starters you can use to help you with your thesis, which may need to be more than one sentence long...
A: In [text], [author] uses [or pick a better verb] [means of characterization] to portray Odysseus as _ [describes O's personality]. [Then add another similar sentence that is similar in structure, but about the other text.]
B. In both the Odyssey and "Ulysses," Odysseus appears to be [describe shared personality traits]. However, while Homer relies on [or pick another verb] _ [means of characterization] to highlight Odysseus' _ [personality traits], Tennyson uses _ [ means of characterization] to make Odysseus seem more [describe personality].

English 11 Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 6 of Song of Solomon; complete #1 on the HW side of SDE 24

AP: Re-read pp. 1-11 of The Heart of Understanding

Due 5/4

AP: read and annotate pp. 5-11 of The Heart of Understanding

English 11 Delta: read and annotate the rest of Ch. 5 of Song of Solomon

English 11 Gamma: Read and annotate Ch. 6 of Song of Solomon. Here are the "narrative assistance" questions to help you along:
P. 152
Milkman and Guitar are talking; Guitar has now quit smoking as well as drinking.
What is the purpose of the secret society to which Guitar belongs -- What do they do? How do they do it? Why?
How does Milkman respond to what Guitar tells him -- Does he agree or disagree with the purpose of the group, for starters? How come?
For Guitar, are people individuals first, or members of a race first? How can you tell?
For Milkman, are people individuals first, or members of a race first? How can you tell?
What do you think?
What good does Guitar think the group does?
Why does it not do any good, according to Milkman?
What do you think?
P. 160
Pay very close attention to the end of Guitar and Milkman’s conversation at the end of the chapter, starting with Guitar saying “I don’t give a shit…” near the middle of 160.

Due 5/3
English 11 Delta: Revised, typed, double-spaced, MLA format 2nd draft of Milkman analytic paragraph -- printed, on paper, at the start of class (up to 30 major assignment points)

HEX: Complete your notes for Section I of the prompt directions (1, 2, and 3 in Section I near the top of the second page of the prompt); add textual evidence to your notes! (Include book and/or page and/or line numbers)

English 11 Gamma: Read and annotate the rest of Ch. 5 of Song of Solomon

Due 5/2
AP: Complete multiple choice questions 15-29 in our present packet (if you need another copy, it has been uploaded -- not by me! -- at http://www.erhsnyc.org/ourpages/auto/2016/2/2/47894010/AP_EngLang_Practice_Exam_2014.pdf

English 11 Gamma: Revised, typed, double-spaced, MLA format 2nd draft of Milkman analytic paragraph -- printed, on paper, at the start of class (up to 30 major assignment points)

HEX: Read and annotate "Ulysses," by Tennyson. Be sure to identify for yourself words and phrases that you do not know, in addition to your regular annotations.

Due 5/1
AP: revised, typed, double-spaced, edited, proofread final draft of DIY Modest Proposal, with 6 labeled rhetorical devices

English 11 Gamma and Delta: Vocabulary Quiz (finish SDE 23 and practice vocab exercise from Thursday if you haven't yet)

Due 4/28
HEX: Complete both sides of SDE 23

English 11 Delta: complete rough draft of Milkman paragraph (see directions on Ch. 4 Reading Guide) -- 20 HW points; complete Ch. 4 Reading Guide -- 10 HW points; Ch. 3 and 4 annotations check -- Friday; study for Monday's vocabulary quiz

Due 4/27
AP: Rough draft of DIY Modest Proposal assignment

English 11 Gamma: complete rough draft of Milkman paragraph (see directions on Ch. 4 Reading Guide) -- 20 HW points; complete Ch. 4 Reading Guide -- 10 HW points; Ch. 3 and 4 annotations check -- Thursday; study for Monday's vocabulary quiz

English 11 Delta: no new homework

Due 4/26
English 11 Delta: read and annotate Ch. 4 of Song of Solomon; study for Friday's vocabulary quiz

HEX: read and annotate the first 9 pages of Book 24 of the Odyssey

Due 4/25
English 11 Gamma: read and annotate Ch. 4 of Song of Solomon; study for Thursday's vocabulary quiz

HEX: no new homework; please come to class ready to discuss Book 23 of the Odyssey

Due 4/24
AP: Complete the 2nd and 3rd multiple choice sections in the packet you received today (work expeditiously -- figure out how much time you should use if you had 70 seconds per question -- check your answers, reflect briefly in writing on items you answer incorrectly); think in the back of your head about what you might want to write about for the DIY satire assignment; we will go over the "Modest Proposal" reading questions on Monday

HEX: read and annotate Book 23 of the Odyssey

English 11 Delta: finish the Ch. 3 Reading Guide and Sentence Diagramming Exercise 22

English 11 Gamma: finish the Ch. 3 Reading Guide; IF YOU HAVE NOT YET, TURN IN YOUR BOOK ON MONDAY FOR AN ANNOTATIONS CHECK ON CH. 1 AND 2

Due 4/21
English 11 Gamma: remember that you need to submit your book today if you were present on Thursday and want to earn credit for your Ch. 1-2 annotations!

English 11 Delta: read and annotate the rest of Ch. 3 of Song of Solomon

HEX: no new HW

AP: Here is the prompt for your next multi-draft writing assignment. Please read it and come to class tomorrow with ideas for what you might write about.

Due 4/20
AP: Answer the reading questions for Swift's "A Modest Proposal"

English 11 Gamma: Read and annotate through p. 85 of Song of Solomon

English 11 Delta: Read and annotate to the section break on p. 62 of Song of Solomon

HEX: no new HW

Due 4/19
English 11 Delta: prepare for Wednesday's vocab quiz; revise your Ch. 2 Reading Guide if you haven't turned it in yet; complete both sides of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #21

HEX: no new HW

English 11 Gamma: read and annotate pp. 56-62 of Song of Solomon

Due 4/18
HEX: complete your PARCC-style Narrative Essay, if you did not turn it in in class on Friday; rest up for the PARCC next week

English 11 Gamma: prepare for Tuesday's vocab quiz; revise your Ch. 2 Reading Guide if you haven't turned it in yet; complete both sides of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #21

AP: I hope the practice exam went well. Each essay will count as a major assignment (you may revise them later); each multiple choice question will count as a class work point (for completion)

Due 4/15
AP: Bring a snack and a writing tool to tomorrow's practice exam.

Due 4/14
HEX: Complete the multiple choice PARCC packet you received today to the best of your ability. The packet contains an essay prompt. You do not need to write the essay at this time, but please do construct a thesis for the essay. Also, select an episode or event from Books 9-19 of the Odyssey to re-write from the perspective of another character than Odysseus.

AP: No new homework

English 11 Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 2 of Song of Solomon (Ch. 2 reading guide due Friday); study vocabulary list 5 (quiz on Wednesday, 4/18); I will be collecting books for an annotations check on Friday -- make sure you have your book!

English 11 Gamma: add quotations to the "Brother and Sister" section of your Ch. 2 reading guide and make sure you've thoroughly completed the "Character Depth" section if you wish to earn 20/20 for the assignment; study for Tuesday's vocabulary quiz; complete SDE 21 for Tuesday

Due 4/13
AP: Don't write the paragraph assignment. Do read and annotate the selection from the "Looking and the Gaze" article you received in class today.

English 11 Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 2 of Song of Solomon (Ch. 2 reading guide due Friday); study vocabulary list 5 (quiz on Wednesday, 4/18); I will be collecting books for an annotations check on Friday -- make sure you have your book!

English 11 Gamma: Song of Solomon Ch. 2 Reading Guide; study vocabulary list 5 (quiz on Tuesday, 4/17); bring your copy of Song of Solomon -- IT WILL BE COLLECTED FOR AN ANNOTATIONS CHECK

Due 4/12
English 11 Delta: complete Song of Solomon Ch. 1 reading guide (also, vocab quiz next Wednesday, so start studying)

English 11 Gamma: read and annotate Ch. 2 of Song of Solomon (also, vocab quiz next Tuesday, so start studying)

HEX: Complete the graphic organizer you received in class today for Sonnets 18 and 55 (do both sides, in other words) (20 HW points)

Due 4/11
English 11 Gamma: complete Song of Solomon Ch. 1 reading guide (also, vocab quiz next Tuesday, so start studying)

HEX: come to class with Book 19 of the Odyssey read and annotated, and be ready to discuss the last 8 pages in depth

AP: HERE IS THE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT FROM CLASS, BUT IT WILL BE DUE THURSDAY!!!!! Why would feminist parents be potentially frustrated and annoyed that their child (really it's their daughter, of course) is offered the image you received at the end of class to color? (here, a good working definition of "feminist" is "believing all people are equally human"). Review Ch. 3 of Berger's Ways of Seeing, and look at the parts of these two that we haven't discussed yet: http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/ARTH_220/looking.htm, http://www.uvm.edu/%7Etstreete/powerpose/malegaze.html (hint: look for images with mirrors)

Due 4/10
English 11 Gamma and Delta: Read and annotate the rest of Ch. 1 of Song of Solomon

AP: Complete multiple choice packet you received on Thursday (or Friday, whichever you haven't done already). Check your answers, and reflect briefly in writing on your thought process for any item you answered incorrectly.

HEX: read and annotate Book 19 of the Odyssey.

Due 4/7
HEX: Read and annotate the rest of Book 16 of the Odyssey

English 11 Delta: Vocab quiz (list 4) Friday

Due 4/6
AP: look at some/all of the images from ESPN the Magazine's 2016 Bodies We Want gallery: http://www.espn.com/espn/feature/story/_/page/body/espn-magazine-body-issue; also this one of hammer thrower Amanda Bingson: http://www.espn.com/espn/photos/gallery/_/id/13174028/image/33/amanda-bingson-bodies-want-2015#; and the two here of boxer Rhonda Rousey (images 19 and 20 in the gallery): http://www.espn.com/espn/photos/gallery/_/id/8136693/image/19/ronda-rousey-2012-body-issue-bodies-want-espn-magazine. How do we "read" the images here? Which of these are worth talking about on Thursday, for the ways that they are similar to and different from images we've been discussing in class for the past few weeks?

ENGLISH 11 DELTA: COMPLETE YOUR SAT-STYLE ESSAY, IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY!!! TURN IN YOUR Q3 WARM-UPS, IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY!!! (YOUR Q3 GRADE, WHICH YOU CAN STILL SEE, PROVIDES AN EXCELLENT CHECK OF WHETHER YOU'VE DONE BOTH OF THESE OR NOT)

English 11 Gamma: study for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz

Due 4/5
English 11 Delta: Bring your copy of Song of Solomon to class tomorrow; vocab quiz on List 4 on Thursday

HEX: learn what happens in Books 14 and 15 of the Odyssey; maybe take some notes?

English 11 Gamma: study for Thursday's vocabulary quiz

Due 4/4
AP: Bring in an ad that uses an image of a person's body (either on paper or by emailing me a url). Bring yourself, prepared to discuss the ways in which it does or does not structure itself to satisfy a male gaze. (10 HW points)

English 11 Gamma: Bring your copy of Song of Solomon to class tomorrow; vocab quiz on List 4 on Thursday

HEX: Read and annotate the rest of Book 13 of the Odyssey



English 11 -- here is the prompt for the SAT-style essay we are working on, if you need another copy:

Due 3/23
AP: See HW for 3/22

English 11: Tomorrow's sentence diagramming assessment is open-book, open note (no electronic resources, however). The following need to be completed and turned in tomorrow:
1. Sentence Diagramming Assessment
2. Q3 Warm-ups (bring your notebook so you can turn it in!)
3. SAT-style essay (completed by many Gamma period students already -- congratulations!)
4. Notes from today's class (applies to Gamma period only)

Due 3/22
English 11 Delta: you will have considerable problems in class on Wednesday unless your reading questions on the excerpt from Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl are done. You will have a grammar and sentence diagramming assessment on Thursday, so you should pull together resources and materials you might use on the test, and review tricky sentences from recent worksheets. (Note: diagramming the previous sentence would be excellent practice and review... perhaps you might receive a little extra credit for doing so correctly on a separate piece of paper?)

English 11 Gamma: Your SAT-style in-class essay on the selection from Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is due at the start of class on Monday (hand-written is fine) (value: 30 major assignment points); you will have a grammar and sentence diagramming assessment on Thursday, so you should pull together resources and materials you might use on the test, and review tricky sentences from recent worksheets. (Note: diagramming the previous sentence would be excellent practice and review... perhaps you might receive a little extra credit for doing so correctly on a separate piece of paper?)

AP: Look at the first few pages of this web essay (all the ones with the men posing the way women in ads do). What's going on, in terms of our looking at these images (use our thinking from Berger and our text on the gaze)? What might one think is funny about these? What does the impulse to laugh show or tell us about how we look at images of men and women in our society? (Expect these as the warm-up questions tomorrow)
http://www.uvm.edu/%7Etstreete/powerpose/introduction.html

HEX: You will have a grammar and sentence diagramming assessment on Wednesday, so you should pull together resources and materials you might use on the test, and review tricky sentences from recent worksheets. Think about whether you would like to take the extra-challenging or slightly simplified (15% penalty) version of the assessment. Note: diagramming the previous sentence would be excellent practice and review, likewise dealing with these:
1. Instead of five or ten dollars, the Mr. Jones' payment for lawn-mowing and hedge-trimming was a free pass to Six Flags; I went there and rode all of the roller coasters every weekend in the summer of 2016.
2. With his shield on his back and his weapons in his hands, Aeneas hoisted his father over his shoulder and walked with his son out of the city of Troy; with friends and fellow citizens, he sailed off in search of a new home.

Due 3/21
English 11 Gamma: Draft an introductory paragraph for your SAT-style essay on the excerpt from Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (20 HW points)

AP: no new HW

HEX: read and annotate pp. 271-275 of the Odyssey. Here are two sentences you can work on for sentence diagramming review purposes:
1. Despite (prep) her strong misgivings, Grace strode boldly forward into the dark cave, but she would find nothing graceful or elegant in the monster hiding within.
2. In nearly all Godzilla movies after the first one, the fire-breathing, spiny, and scaly monster is our protagonist, for he staunchly defends and protects us from other alien beasts, like Rodan and Mothra.

Due 3/20
HEX: read and annotate Bk 11 of the Odyssey, if you have not done so already

English 11 Delta: Complete the first 3 steps on the second page of your SAT-style essay packet (read and annotate the passage, circle and make notes about or look up words you don't know, answer the reading questions in the footnotes)

AP: Select one of the three advertisements at the end of the web article "Looking and the Gaze" (http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/ARTH_220/looking.htm). Compose a thoughtful paragraph explaining what is going on in the image, in terms of a woman being represented -- most people expressed ambivalence about the extents to which these images are images of empowerment and/or objectification. Explain that ambivalence in a paragraph; be thorough and thoughtful (20 HW points).

Due 3/17
HEX: read and annotate Bk 11 of the Odyssey; finish SDE 16 if you did not do so in class

AP: study and make notes on the three images at the end of your "Looking and the Gaze" packet -- in what ways do the subjects of these images resist the gaze, and in what ways do they not?

English 11 Delta: you do have a vocabulary quiz tomorrow. In addition, please complete your 12 Years a Slave film questions (20 CW points), finish the front side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #16 (10 HW points), and bring the essay prompt you received in class today.

Due 3/16
English 11 Gamma: study for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz, catch up in the SAT-style essay packet if you did not complete the previous HW assignment and/or were not in class today; come to class ready for tomorrow's group work and drafting (see directions in essay packet)

English 11 Delta: continue to study for FRIDAY's vocabulary quiz

AP: see previous HW asmt.

Due 3/15
English 11 Delta: continue to study for Thursday's vocabulary quiz

Due 3/14
HEX: read and annotate Book 10 of the Odyssey

English 11 Gamma: study for Wednesday's no-matter-what-happens-on-Tuesday-,-the-quiz-is-still-Wednesday vocabulary quiz; complete the first three steps on the second page of the essay packet you received today (read and annotate the text, circle and try to figure out words you don't know, answer the reading questions in the footnotes IN WRITING) -- you will go over these in your small groups in our next class.

AP: continue to study test language vocabulary; bring Ch. 2 and 3 of Berger to class on Wednesday

Due 3/13
English 11 Gamma: complete 12 Years A Slave film questions sheet (20 class work points); study this week's vocabulary; complete 1 sentence on the HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #15

English 11 Delta: complete 1 sentence on the HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #15 (leaving the other one for class on Monday or Tuesday); study this week's vocabulary

HEX: update your annotations chart for the Odyssey

AP: What options are there for representing women, or for women being represented, in ways that are not objectifying?
Review the two sources below, and make a list of strategies and some notes about how each one works (you should come up with at least 4 -- I count 1 in the first source below and at least 4 in the second). Bring this to class on Monday for discussion (20 HW points). NOTE: THE SKYY VODKA AND COTY WILD MUSK ADS IN THE SECOND SOURCE DO NOT COUNT -- AT LEAST NOT YET (WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT THEM)
Here is the full web essay that we've been discussing several pages of: http://www.uvm.edu/%7Etstreete/powerpose/introduction.html
Here is another web essay, from a SUNY Oneonta professor: http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/ARTH_220/looking.htm (scroll down to "Feminist Responses", though the entire article is a dense but good recap of a lot of what we've been talking about and includes a section on the ways girls are trained to think of themselves as something to be looked at -- gazed at, if you will)


Due 3/10
HEX: finish HW side of SDE 15

AP: read and annotate the article you received today in class

English 11 Delta: Construct flashcards, begin studying Vocab List 3

Due 3/9

English 11 Gamma: construct flashcards and begin studying vocabulary words

English 11 Delta: no new HW

AP: Continue studying test vocabulary

Due 3/8
English 11 Delta: The following three things will occur on TUESDAY (Gamma) / WEDNESDAY (Delta) -- 1. Choice Writing #8 will be due, 2. Sentence Diagramming Exercise #14 will be due, 3. Vocabulary Quiz #2 will happen.

AP: continue studying test vocabulary

English 11 Gamma: no new work

HEX: read and annotate (3 notes per page) the rest of Book 9 of the Odyssey

Due 3/7
English 11 Gamma: The following three things will occur on TUESDAY (Gamma) / WEDNESDAY (Delta) -- 1. Choice Writing #8 will be due, 2. Sentence Diagramming Exercise #14 will be due, 3. Vocabulary Quiz #2 will happen.

HEX: complete the HW side of SDE 14

AP: begin studying your test vocabulary words

Due 3/6
English 11 Gamma and Delta: The following three things will occur on TUESDAY (Gamma) / WEDNESDAY (Delta) -- 1. Choice Writing #8 will be due, 2. Sentence Diagramming Exercise #14 will be due, 3. Vocabulary Quiz #2 will happen. In addition, if you were not present in class on Thursday, March 2, and you or your family is not comfortable with you watching 12 Years a Slave as part of our curriculum, you need to submit the completed Opt-Out form as soon as you can (attached below).


AP: Make a list of questions that will help us discuss/probe/explore/critique Berger's argument in chapters 2 and 3 of Ways of Seeing, and the ideas we are encountering as we do so (10 HW points).

HEX: Complete the front side of SDE 14

Due 3/3
HEX: bring your peer conference sheet (sheet of paper with your questions for a peer conference, plus the written feedback they generated) to class; bring also a typed, double-spaced, revised, MLA format second draft of your figurative language analysis paragraph (up to 30 major assignment points)

Due 3/2
AP: read and annotate Ch. 2 of Ways of Seeing. Some things to think about: how do you "read" a text with no words, only images? what is Berger's argument here? why are images from the art world and mass media culture being juxtaposed here?

English 11 Delta and Gamma: Construct flashcards for this week's vocab words and begin studying them (start with synonyms and antonyms)

Due 3/1
HEX: The following all need to be completed by the start of class on Wednesday -- 1. read and annotate Book 8 of the Odyssey, 2. complete a rough draft of your figurative language analysis paragraph, 3. conduct a peer conference on your draft in class

English 11 Delta and Gamma: Construct flashcards for this week's vocab words and begin studying them (start with synonyms and antonyms)

Due 2/28
HEX: see list of what is due on 3/1

AP: FOR THURSDAY -- read and annotate Ch. 2 of Ways of Seeing. Some things to think about: how do you "read" a text with no words, only images? what is Berger's argument here? why are images from the art world and mass media culture being juxtaposed here?

English 11 Gamma: If you stuck around long enough after class today, you received an assignment on a handout... if you didn't, you will get it tomorrow. Please come to class ready to undertake a practice SAT essay in class tomorrow. Please be on time (you will need the whole class period for the essay).

Due 2/27
English 11 Gamma: Complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #13 (all of the class work side, any two sentences on the homework side); be ready for vocabulary quiz

Due 2/24
HEX: finish Sentence Diagramming Exercise #13, complete the graphic organizer for your figurative language analysis paragraph (20 HW points), finish charting your annotations for Books 5-7 of the Odyssey

English 11 Delta: I know I directed you to paraphrase the SAT essay rubric in writing for homework; you can hold off on that and we'll do it tomorrow in class. Please do study your vocabulary for Friday, and please do complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #13 for Monday (any two sentences on the HW side)

AP: no new homework

Due 2/23
English 11, both sections: make flashcards of this week's words; write the word on one side, and the definition, synonyms, and antonyms on the other. See me in tutorial if you need index cards. Study your words for at least 10 minutes per night (without doing anything else). Start with the synonyms and antonyms.

AP: Check your answers for yesterday's multiple choice packet, writing a brief but specific reflection on your thought process for all items you answered incorrectly. Bring your finished work from yesterday's double period to Thursday's class.

Due 2/21 or first day back from the long weekend
HEX, English 11 Gamma, English 11 Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #12, both sides

HEX: read and annotate Book 7 of the Odyssey; select a passage for a figurative language analysis paragraph of your own (no more than 2 pp. in length, can be from anywhere in Books 5, 6, or 7 (or 8, I guess)

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 3 of John Berger's Ways of Seeing (received in class today). Be prepared for the fact that it is about images of women's bodies in Western art and culture.

Due 2/17
HEX: read and annotate (3 notes per page) Book 6 of the Odyssey

AP: read and annotate synthesis prompt texts (honor code) -- think about what sources to use and plan your thesis in your head; pay attention to what kind of writing each written source is, and to the (multiple? different?) ways the visual texts can be used.

Due 2/16
English 11 Delta and Gamma: prepare your POL poem for performance (graded performances begin Thursday)

AP: see 2/15

Due 2/15
English 11 Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #11 (both sides); prepare your POL poem for performance (graded performances begin Thursday)

AP: Construct an outline of the US Postal Service synthesis essay. Consider: how should the introduction be structured? Compose the intro paragraph (leave the rest of the essay as an outline, but do note which evidence you will use)

HEX:
Finish your work from class Monday (see below), and come to class on Wednesday ready to perform your POL poem for a grade
I. Select 5 short quotations with strong images from Book V of the Odyssey. On a blank, unlined sheet of paper…
— write out each quotation (include a citation — “5.123-124” = Book 5, lines
123-124)
—draw an illustration of each image (small enough that all 5 fit on 1 sheet of
paper)
Value: up to 20 class work points

II. On a separate sheet of paper, find and copy out an example from Book V of each kind of figurative language we know about (include a citation; see the wall above Nathan, Adrien, Grace, and Kayla, but leave out Allegory):
—simile
—metaphor
—personification
—synesthesia
—oxymoron
—paradox
—pun
—metonymy
—synecdoche
—irony
—litotes
—allusion
—understatement
—hyperbole
—euphemism
Label each. It is all right if the same quote contains multiple different kinds of figurative language
Value: up to 30 class work points

Due 2/14
AP: Fences reflection (write something thoughtful, at least 2/3 page in length), Brutus v. Antony comparative rhetorical analysis essay due -- PLEASE INCLUDE 6 UNDERLINED AND LABELED RHETORICAL DEVICES

English 11 Gamma: Choice Writing assignment (#7 overall, first of Q3); Sentence Diagramming Exercise #11 (both sides); prepare your POL poem for performance (graded performances begin Wednesday)

HEX: Finish your work from class today, come to class on Tuesday ready to perform your POL poem for a grade
I. Select 5 short quotations with strong images from Book V of the Odyssey. On a blank, unlined sheet of paper…
— write out each quotation (include a citation — “5.123-124” = Book 5, lines
123-124)
—draw an illustration of each image (small enough that all 5 fit on 1 sheet of
paper)
Value: up to 20 class work points

II. On a separate sheet of paper, find and copy out an example from Book V of each kind of figurative language we know about (include a citation; see the wall above Nathan, Adrien, Grace, and Kayla, but leave out Allegory):
—simile
—metaphor
—personification
—synesthesia
—oxymoron
—paradox
—pun
—metonymy
—synecdoche
—irony
—litotes
—allusion
—understatement
—hyperbole
—euphemism
Label each. It is all right if the same quote contains multiple different kinds of figurative language
Value: up to 30 class work points

Due 2/13
HEX: prepare your POL poem for performance; get feedback from others using the rubric you have received

Due 2/10
HEX: practice your hopefully-by-now memorized POL poem at least five times -- with varying tones of voice and any gestures you plan to use (advice: practice reciting in front of a mirror, or with a person who can give you feedback); complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #11 HW

Due 2/9
English 11 Delta: memorize your POL poem (20 HW points), adding tones of voice to your line-by-line sheet if you're not finished yet (and adding the expression of emotions to your recitation!)

English 11 Gamma: practice your hopefully-by-now memorized POL poem at least five times -- with varying tones of voice and any gestures you plan to use (advice: practice reciting in front of a mirror, or with a person who can give you feedback)

AP: final draft of Brutus v. Antony comparative rhetorical analysis due Monday; check your answers to today's multiple choice questions, and reflect briefly and specifically in writing on items you answered incorrectly

Due 2/8

English 11 Delta: memorize your POL poem (20 HW points), adding emotions to your line-by-line sheet if you're not finished yet (and adding the expression of emotions to your recitation!)

HEX: memorize your own POL poem (20 HW points); add tones of voice and gestures as you think appropriate to your line-by-line sheet; bring your copy of the Odyssey tomorrow

AP: final draft of Brutus v. Antony comparative rhetorical analysis due Monday; check your answers to today's multiple choice questions, and reflect briefly and specifically in writing on items you answered incorrectly

English 11 Gamma: memorize your POL poem (20 HW points), adding tones of voice to your line-by-line sheet if you need to -- add the tones of voice to your practice recitation, too!

Due 2/7
English 11 Gamma: memorize your POL poem (20 HW points), adding emotions to your line-by-line sheet if you're not finished yet (and adding the expression of emotions to your recitation!)

HEX: memorize your POL poem (20 HW points)

AP: Brutus and Antony essay draft due tomorrow

Due 2/6
English 11 Gamma, English 11 Delta, HEX: memorize your selected Poetry Out Loud poem

AP: finish reading the last two chapters of Words Like Loaded Pistols, if you haven't already; begin work on your comparative rhetorical analysis of Brutus' and Antony's speeches (rough draft due Tuesday); view A Few Good Men; bring your copy of Words Like Loaded Pistols on Monday (so we can read along while watching the courtroom scene from A Few Good Men)

Due 2/3
HEX: memorize the poem you have chosen; add specific tones of voice and gestures to the annotations on your copy of your poem

AP: Watch A Few Good Men by Monday; rough draft of comparative rhetorical analysis essay (Brutus vs. Antony) due Tuesday; read Obama's 2008 victory speech (try to notice rhetorical devices)

English 11 Delta: begin work to memorize your own poem -- read it out loud 5 times; practice the repeating lines strategy we've been using in class (with individual lines and pairs of lines at least)

Due 2/2
AP: read the last two chapters of Words Like Loaded Pistol (and bring your book on Thursday) -- we will NOT write a practice essay

English 11 Gamma: memorize "song in the front yard" (20 HW points); begin working to memorize the poem you have chosen; be sure to have your own copy of that poem with you in class tomorrow

English 11 Delta: memorize "song in the front yard" (20 HW points); finish Poetry Out Loud scavenger hunt; come to our next class with your own copy of the poem you've chosen, having decided whether or not you are interested in representing our class at the school competition next Tuesday

Due 2/1
HEX: work on memorizing the following 3 poems: "Ozymandias," "The New Colossus," and the poem by a Romantic poet (see below) that you have selected from the Poetry Out Loud website

English 11 Gamma: memorize "a song in the front yard," complete your POL Scavenger Hunt (using Harlem Renaissance and other African-American writers only), bring a copy of the poem you plan to perform to class, and decide whether you're interested in representing our class at the school competition on Thursday

Due 1/31
HEX: Complete Poetry Out Loud Scavenger Hunt (including printing out the poem of your choice); Bring Odyssey tomorrow; memorize "Ozymandias"; don't lose "The New Colossus." For the Poetry Out Loud scavenger hunt, look at poetryoutloud.org, and choose from among the following poets: William Wordsworth, Samuel Coleridge, John Keats, Percy Shelley (but not "Ozymandias"), Lord Byron (George Gordon), William Blake, Robert Burns, Edgar Allen Poe, Charlotte Smith, Emily Dickinson, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Mary Robinson, Dorothy Wordsworth, William Cullen Bryant, John Greenleaf Whittier, Walt Whitman, Emily Bronte, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, James Russell Lowell, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Christina Rossetti

AP: Read and annotate 3.2 of Julius Caesar

English 11 (both classes): Complete the Poetry Out Loud Scavenger Hunt at poetryoutloud.org. Look at poems by the following writers: Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, James Weldon Johnson, Melvin B. Tolson, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Robert Hayden, Gwendolyn Brooks, Kevin Young, Nate Marshall, Nikki Giovanni, Margaret Walker, Lucille Clifton, Rita Dove; memorize "a song for the front yard"

Due 1/30
AP: Final draft of natural rights essay (include 6 labeled rhetorical devices)

English 11: memorize "a song in the front yard"; complete the class work side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #10

Due 1/27
HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #10 (both sides), memorize "Ozymandias." Hey -- tomorrow we will have a short class period and a Poetry Out Loud recitation workshop. We will not have time to go over Sentence Diagramming Exercise #10 until Monday

AP: Final draft of natural rights essay due Monday. Please include at least 6 rhetorical devices (label them).

Due 1/26
AP: Rough draft of Natural Rights essay (20 HW points); check your answers on today's multiple choice questions -- for each item you answered incorrectly, reflect briefly in writing on your thought process (and then remember to give the packet to me on Thursday)

English 11 Delta: no new HW (did you finish and hand in your Harlem Renaissance film sheet?)

English 11 Gamma: begin work on memorizing "a song in the front yard" (try to get through working with groups of four lines)

Due 1/25
HEX: memorize "Ozymandias" (20 HW points)

English 11 Gamma: memorize "Stopping by Woods..."

Due 1/24
English 11 Gamma: memorize "Stopping By Woods..."

AP: work on natural rights essay

HEX: memorize "Ozymandias" (20 HW points)

Due 1/23
First, an apology: I could not update Thursday afternoon because the wiki was down. I have been busy with personal matters since.

ALL CLASSES: PLEASE ARRIVE IN OUR ROOM ON MONDAY READY TO TURN IN YOUR Q2 WARM-UPS

AP: think about, make some notes on, the question of whether or not natural rights exist (If they do, on what grounds might one make that claim? If they do not, how do we think about rights?)

English 11, both classes: Memorize "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening" (readily available online)

HEX: read and annotate (3 notes per page) the rest of Book 1 of Homer's Odyssey

Due 1/19
English 11 (both classes): come to class tomorrow with "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening", by Robert Frost, memorized and ready to recite (20 HW points)

AP: respond to the following in the Warm-up section of your notebooks/binders:
1. Where would Thorough come down on the issue of whether or not morality is objective and universal?
2. and 3. What are two different ways we can tell?

HEX: TUTORIALS HELD NEXT WEEK CAN COUNT TOWARDS Q2 IF YOU LIKE; prepare for tomorrow's vocabulary quiz (be ready to provide the definition of every word, a phonetic spelling of every word, and the roots (and the meanings of those roots) and language of origin of every word

Due 1/18
English 11 (both classes): revised, typed, double-spaced, edited, proofread, MLA format final draft of Gatsby film analysis due ON PAPER at the start of class. Print it out BEFORE the passing time between Beta and Gamma periods.

HEX: study for a vocabulary quiz next Friday (definitions, all roots and their meanings plus languages of origin, phonetic spellings)

AP: work on essay revisions, finish "Civil Disobedience" reading questions if you haven't already

Due 1/17
AP: read and annotate the rest of "Civil Disobedience," responding to the reading questions as you go.

English 11 Gamma: Conduct a peer conference on your writing assignment draft, with whoever works with you writing on your conference sheet (20 HW points -- there needs to be writing that isn't yours on the sheet of paper with the questions you wrote down today)

English 11 Delta: Typed, double-spaced, revised 2nd draft of paragraph -- printed, on paper, before the start of class (20 HW points)

HEX: begin studying for a vocabulary quiz next Friday (definitions, roots and languages of origin, phonetic spellings)

Due 1/13
HEX: final draft of Hebrew Bible essay (please set aside some time to edit and proofread) (30 major assignment points)

AP: think about/review what you need to do in order to do the best you can tomorrow on a rhetorical analysis essay -- how should you approach the prompt? what will you look for while you're reading the text? what needs to be in your introduction?

English 11 Delta: rough draft of our current writing assignment (Gatsby film analysis) (20 HW points)

Due 1/12
AP: Write a paragraph: we talked today about the consequences of everyone following their conscience all the time, and how to manage that (great job, again, immediately thinking of the societal and ethical ramifications if everyone took the moral stance we were considering)... but how do you (as an individual) decide when to follow your conscience ("to do... what I think is right" -- Thoreau), and when not to? Also, please continue reading and annotating "Civil Disobedience" -- p. 6-8, answering the attending reading questions (though, to be honest, we'll be lucky if we get that far through the text on Thursday)

English 11 Gamma: compose a rough draft of your paragraph (20 HW points); GATHER EVIDENCE FIRST!

English 11 Delta: complete items 1, 2, and 3 at the top on the reverse of the writing assignment prompt ("List 2-3 characters or themes that ou might be willing to write about. Explain why you find each interesting.") Also, can you i.d. the parts of sentence for, parts of speech for, and diagram the following sentence? (no points, just practice... also, what is significant about this event for NBA history?)
To the Houston Rockets, Hakeem Olajuwon seemed to be the best choice for the first NBA draft pick of 1984.

Due 1/11
HEX: Hebrew Bible rough draft (30 HW points) and pre-writing (30 CW points) due at the start of class on Wednesday

English 11: complete items 1, 2, and 3 at the top on the reverse of the writing assignment prompt ("List 2-3 characters or themes that ou might be willing to write about. Explain why you find each interesting.") Also, can you i.d. the parts of sentence for, parts of speech for, and diagram the following sentence? (no points, just practice... also, what is significant about this event for NBA history?)
To the Houston Rockets, Hakeem Olajuwon seemed to be the best choice for the first NBA draft pick of 1984.

Due 1/10
HEX: Film reflection questions (pre-writing and rough draft of essay due Wednesday!)

AP: check your answers from today's multiple choice questions; reflect briefly in writing on any item you answered incorrectly; read and annotate pp. 1-5 of "Civil Disobedience", answering in writing the reading questions for those pages

English 11: on the writing prompt you received today, complete the graphic organizer on the front side for the characters only

Due 1/9
AP: Precis assignment due Monday (30 major assignment points)

English 11: "Write Like Fitzgerald" assignment due Monday -- typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, proofread, MLA format, DUE ON PAPER AT THE START OF CLASS, PLAN AHEAD, IF YOU'RE LATE TO CLASS ON MONDAY, YOUR ASSIGNMENT IS ALSO LATE (30 major assignment points); please hand in your final draft, rough draft, and rubric

HEX: begin work on the pre-writing and drafting for the Hebrew Bible essay -- pre-writing (30 CW points) and rough draft (30 HW points) due at the start of class on Wednesday. If you realize that you could really use your annotated copy of Exodus: I'm sorry that I've still got it; I hope you can make do for a while with another copy -- the text is pretty easy to find online, and the chapter and verse numbers will be the same (we're using the "New Revised Standard Version" if you want exactly the same words)

Due 1/6
[I'm sorry; we did talk explicitly about the homework in class, though]

Due 1/5
HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #9, Exodus readings with annotations

AP: rough draft of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" precis

English 11: annotations for Ch. 8 and 9 of Gatsby due ASAP, if you have not yet submitted them; if you come to class tomorrow without your "Write Like Fitzgerald" draft, you are going to have problems

Due 1/4
HEX: Exodus annotations

English 11: you must bring a paper copy of your "Write Like Fitzgerald" draft to class tomorrow to be able to participate in tomorrow's peer conferences, unless you have submitted your draft to me already

AP: Read and annotate pp. 195-217 in Words Like Loaded Pistols

Due 1/3
English 11: you may still receive full credit for your Ch. 8 and 9 annotations, and for your "Write Like Fitzgerald" draft

Due Any Time Before Break
English 11: Gatsby annotations for Ch. 8 AND 9; rough draft of "Write Like Fitzgerald" assignment

Due 12/16
HEX: prepare for vocab quiz (words, synonyms, antonyms, cognates); complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise 9

AP: Finish MLK question packet if you haven't turned it in already; come to class tomorrow ready to do your best on the next Rhetorical Analysis essay

English 11 Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 8 of Gatsby, if you haven't already

Due 12/15
English 11 Gamma: you should expect to turn in your copy of Gatsby for an annotations check (HW points)

AP: read and annotate the rest of King's "Letter"; complete all HW questions

Due 12/14
English 11 Delta: read and annotate Ch. 8 of Gatsby

English 11 Gamma: read and annotate Ch. 8 of Gatsby

HEX: Read and annotate Ex. 19-20 (skim 21-21, no need to annotate); read and annotate Ex. 31:12 through Ex. 35 (skim 36-40, no need to annotate); YOU WILL HAVE A VOCABULARY QUIZ ON FRIDAY (SYNONYMS, ANTONYMS, COGNATES)

Due 12/13
AP: Review the questions and answers in your "Letter from Birmingham Jail" packet -- which ones are worth talking about in class? Come to class tomorrow ready to discuss today's warm-up. Also, read https://mic.com/articles/161864/here-s-the-thing-standing-rock-protesters-did-differently-and-won?utm_content=buffer66df9&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer#.AFhSZskq4, and be ready to discuss connections between the water protectors' training and King's four steps in a non-violent civil disobedience campaign.

English 11 Gamma: read and annotate Ch. 8 of Gatsby

HEX: Know your plagues! Come to class ready to write about how the thinking we did in class today might help address the question of why the Lord "remembers" His people in Egypt at the end of Exodus 2. Read and annotate Exodus 13-18; VOCAB QUIZ FRIDAY ON SYNONYMS, ANTONYMS, AND COGNATES

Due 12/12
AP: Revisions of "polite speech" argumentative essay; final draft of essay on the use of violence, with 6 labeled and underlined rhetorical devices; read and annotate the rest of "Letter from Birmingham Jail," answering all questions in the HW packet

English 11: choice writing

HEX: Read and annotate Exodus 5-12 for Monday; submit Genesis annotations on Monday

Due 12/8
English 11 Delta and Gamma: Sentence Diagramming extra credit assignment due tomorrow; sentence diagramming assessment due tomorrow

AP: prep for practice essay tomorrow. Final draft of violence essay due Monday, with 6 labeled and underlined rhetorical devices

Due 12/7
English 11 Delta and Gamma: finish Sentence Diagramming Exercise #7 (up to 20 HW points); SENTENCE DIAGRAMMING ASSESSMENT THURSDAY

HEX: Read and Annotate Exodus 1-4

AP: HEY -- we're doing a practice essay tomorrow; get ready for that. Final draft of your essay is due Monday, with 6 labeled and underlined rhetorical devices

Due 12/6
English 11 Gamma: read and annotate Ch. 6 and 7 of Gatsby; a clean (unmarked), clear (all sentences clear in meaning), revised, typed, double-spaced, MLA format 3rd draft of your paragraph on Gatsby and personal identity is due Monday for Delta period and Tuesday for Gamma period. We will edit and proofread in class on Monday/Tuesday, and you will submit these drafts to be graded as major assignments (with the editing and proofing marks on them).

AP: Revised, typed, double-spaced second draft of essay due Tuesday (edit and proof in class)

HEX: Read Genesis 37-50 or watch or listen to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat; study your synonyms and antonyms; SENTENCE DIAGRAMMING ASSESSMENT WEDNESDAY

Due 12/5
HEX: Read and annotate Genesis 34-35 (and also read Genesis 37-50); complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #7 (assessment on Tuesday 12/6 or Wednesday 12/7)

English 11: read and annotate Ch. 6 and 7 of Gatsby; a clean (unmarked), clear (all sentences clear in meaning), revised, typed, double-spaced, MLA format 3rd draft of your paragraph on Gatsby and personal identity is due Monday for Delta period and Tuesday for Gamma period. We will edit and proofread in class on Monday/Tuesday, and you will submit these drafts to be graded as major assignments (with the editing and proofing marks on them).

AP: Revised, typed, double-spaced second draft of essay due Tuesday (edit and proof in class); read and annotate pp. 1-5 of King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail," and answer in writing the appropriate questions in the homework packet

Due 12/17
AP: Rough draft on essay explaining when it is acceptable to use violence (final draft will require 6 underlined and labeled rhetorical devices)

English 11, both classes: revised, typed, double-spaced draft of paragraph on Gatsby and personal identity due ON PAPER (20 HW points)

Due 11/30
HEX: Review Gen 28-33; we will do 5 min. of vocabulary with synonyms and antonyms, at least, tomorrow

English 11 both sections: read and annotate Ch. 7 of Gatsby; 11/30 will be the last day to submit Sentence Diagramming Exercise 6 for credit; please bring a paper copy of your current 1-paragraph writing assignment (see below for prompt)

Due 11/29
English 11 both sections: hand in Sentence Diagramming Exercise 6 (I will not ask for it; you have to give it to me); read and annotate Ch. 7 of Gatsby; we will work in class on revising paragraphs (see below for prompt) on Tuesday (Delta) and Wednesday (Gamma)

AP: essay draft (see below for prompt) due Wednesday (20 HW points); complete "Ballot or the Bullet" homework assignment, if you have not done so already

HEX: read and annotate Gen 28-33 (class work question packet due at your earliest convenience, but you have to remember to give it to me)

Due 11/22
English 11 both sections: draft of paragraph on Gatsby and personal identity ("Gatsby thinks he can choose, make, or construct his own identity -- that he can make himself become the kind of person he wants to be. Is he right? (What do you think, and why? -- answer in terms of Gatsby, people in general, yourself, or some combination))

HEX: Read and annotate Genesis 24-28 (I will be absent tomorrow; the sub plan will include a packet of reading questions for you)

AP: Complete "Ballot or the Bullet" homework assignment, if you haven't already. On the Tuesday after break, there will be due a rough draft of an essay (of no more than 5 paragraphs in length) on when you think it is appropriate or acceptable to use violence (20 HW points).

Due 11/21
English 11 Gamma and Delta: Choice Writing #5

AP: Complete "Ballot or the Bullet" homework assignment

HEX: study your vocabulary (synonyms, antonyms, cognates, roots, and languages of origins), complete revision of your Book Thief essay, if you plan to (due Monday); be ready to discuss Genesis

Due 11/18
AP: Read the Wikipedia entries for "The Ballot or the Bullet" and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (through "Passage in the Senate"); pay attention to dates -- we're going to make a timeline tomorrow. Read and annotate "The Ballot or the Bullet" (decent audio here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9BVEnEsn6Y -- worth listening to!)

HEX: see below

English 11 Delta: Finish SDE 6; choice writing due Monday

Due 11/17
HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise 7 (no, the assessment will not be next Friday, even though the sheet says that); study your vocabulary; review Genesis 21-22, 24

English 11 Gamma and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 6 of Gatsby

AP: see below

Due 11/16
English 11 Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #5; Read and annotate Ch. 5 of Gatsby

AP:
1. Read and review the rest of the rhetorical analysis essay packet you received today. What do you see each of the sample essays doing successfully? What can each do better? What can you see yourself succeeding with? What will you try to focus your attention and efforts on in your own essay on Thursday, which will be on a different prompt?
2. Construct 5 8.5x11 posters for our wall to help us learn rhetorical devices. Each should include: the name of a rhetorical device (in large, clear font); the definition of the device; two examples of the device (preferably 1 of which is not from our handout). Here are the devices you are responsible for:
Jonathan: alliteration, amplification, anadiplosis, anamnesis, anaphora
Dominique: anastrophe, chiasmus (antimetabole), antistrophe (epistrophe), antithesis, aporia
Maggie: aposiopesis, apostrophe, argumentum ad popsulum, assonance, asyndeton
Harris: auxesis, cacophony, circumlocution, climax, concession
Ayinde: conduplicatio, consonance, diazeugma, digression, enumeration
Robbie: enargia, epiplexis, epizeuxis, erotema, euphemism
Thomas: expletive, hypophora, irony, litotes, understatement (meiosis)
Miranda: metabasis, metaphor, metonymy, occultatio (paralysis), paronomasia
Jeremy: parallelism, place, polyptoton, polysyndeton, scepsis onomaton
Jake: sententious, simile, syllepsis, syploce, synecdoche
Dmitri: hyperbole, tautology, tricolon, tricolon crescens and tricolon diminuens, zeugma

English 11 Gamma: no new homework

HEX: read and annotate Genesis 15-24 (please review the text if you have done so already)

Due 11/15
English 11 Gamma: Read and annotate Ch. 5 of Gatsby

HEX: Bring your first Genesis packet to class tomorrow; read and annotate Genesis 15-24

AP: Come to class tomorrow having printed, read, and annotated copies of Clinton's concession speech and Trump's victory speech


Due 11/14
HEX: Review your annotations of Genesis 5-9 and 11. Be ready to discuss a question something like this: how does God feel towards human beings, in general and in particular, and different points in these stories? Revisions of Book Thief essays due 11/21.

AP: Revisions of "Humorists" argumentative essay due 11/18; complete last night's homework if you didn't already

English 11 both classes: Revised, typed, double-spaced, edited, proofread paragraph on Gatsby with MLA format citations and Works Cited entry due Monday (30 HW points -- ask yourself: do you have enough evidence?); read and annotate Ch. 5 of Gatsby (books to be collected Tuesday or Wednesday of next week)

Due 11/10
AP: Come to class with a printed out, read and annotated victory speech from a major party presidential candidate, and a printed out, read and annotated concession speech from a major party presidential candidate (for our purposes, the Green and Libertarian parties are not major parties)

English 11 Gamma: Complete the Class Work side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise 5. Here is a link that will have the videos -- please do them in order (I had to use my phone, which has a very short memory): https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Nathaniel+Day+sentence+diagramming. Please also make sure you have a paper copy of your Gatsby paragraph with a TYPED Works Cited entry at the START of class tomorrow.

English 11 Delta: Please also make sure you have a paper copy of your Gatsby paragraph with a TYPED Works Cited entry at the START of class tomorrow.

Due 11/9
English 11, both classes: Typed, printed out (YES, ON PAPER) 3rd draft of paragraph on Gatsby -- include textual evidence, MLA format citations, AND typed MLA 8th edition Works Cited entry (20 HW points)

HEX: Complete the front side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #5. I'm sorry I wasn't able to upload the video -- problems with youtube tonight

Due 11/8
English 11 Gamma: Typed, printed out, double-spaced second draft of Gatsby analysis paragraph with textual evidence and citations -- hopefully properly formatted! (20 HW points). A message based on today's Delta period class: "printed out" means ON PAPER. And "Due 11/8" means AT THE START OF CLASS.

HEX: Review your annotations of Gen: 5-9, 11 and complete the following warm-up:
God clearly does not want humans to eat 1) fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, or 2) fruit from the tree of eternal life. How does each of these prohibitions make humans less like God (less "made in God's image")?
3. Explain how there may be a tension between being "made in God's image" and having to obey God's commands.

AP: Read and annotate Michelle Obama's speech from 10/13. Among other things to think about as you read: What rhetorical strategies do you see her using? What is her argument? Who do you think her audience is? How does she match her rhetorical strategies to her audience and argument?

Due 11/7
English 11 Both Classes: Typed, printed out, double-spaced second draft of Gatsby analysis paragraph with textual evidence and citations -- hopefully properly formatted! (20 HW points)

English 11 Gamma: Thanks for a great class on Thursday! Complete both sides of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #4, in addition to the homework above

Sentence Diagramming Exercise #4: https://youtu.be/1iidFrQKX_4

AP: Both Lincoln assignments due Monday (second one = 20 HW points); read and annotate pp. 127-135 in WLLP either this weekend or Monday night (p. 126-127, on "Jokes," is also good). I am not going to officially assign the chapter on "Memory," pp. 147-162, but now is a good time to read it (btw, memory palaces work -- ask me how I know! -- and the memory exercise on p. 160-162 is fun because you'll be surprised how well it works). The "Champions of Rhetoric IV: Hitler and Churchill" chapter is good to read about now, as makes extensive mention of rhetorical devices ("figures") in the speeches of both).

HEX: Complete the reverse side of SDE #4 (10 HW points); we will likely still be talking about Gen: 3-5 on Monday, but the next reading assignment will be to read and annotate Gen: 6-9 and 11 (skip 10)

Due 11/4
HEX: Review Genesis 3-5; complete the front side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #4 (see link above)

English 11 Delta: Choice Writing assignment (value: up to 20 HW points); complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #4

AP: Responses for both Lincoln assignments due Monday; practice essay tomorrow

Due 11/3
AP: Responses for both Lincoln assignments due Monday

English 11 Gamma: complete the front side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #4 (see link above)

English 11 Delta: compose the rough draft of a paragraph analyzing Gatsby's personality -- specifically, whether you think the person he's trying to make himself appear to be and the person he actually is are the same (see underlined questions and directions below); complete the front side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #4 (see link above)

Due 11/2
English 11 Delta: Review the following sections of Gatsby -- p. 48-49 (Nick's impression of Gatsby at Gatsby's party), p. 64-69 (Nick and Gatsby's conversation during the car ride to NYC), p. 78-79 (what Jordan has to say about Gatsby)

AP: Responses for both Lincoln assignments due Monday

HEX: Read and annotate Genesis: 1-5 (the first 5 chapters of the book of Genesis -- 3 annotations per page of text); study your vocabulary; consider what dates from timelines in your History class matter most

English 11 Gamma: Here are the questions from class today, which I hope you will answer tonight if you haven't already (sorry, I don't know why the font size is off and I'm not able to fix it right now):
1. What kind of a person do you think Gatsby wants other people to think he is? (Another way of asking the same thing: What words do you think he would like other people to use to describe him?)
2. Why do you think so?
3. What does Gatsby do to try to create this impression on other people?
4. Do you think he actually is this kind of person? Why or why not?
5. How can you tell? What things does he do or say — or what things does Nick say about him — that tip you off?
6. Take into account our conversation from yesterday — what does his plan to get Daisy back (remember how unnecessarily complicated it is?) affect our thinking about him and the kind of person he is?
7. How does that (your answer to #6) compare to the kind of person he seems to want people to think he is?
8. “Old sport?” Who talks like that?! Why does someone talk this way?! (Nobody else does, old sport, not even in the 1920s)

Come in with something resembling a paragraph analyzing Gatsby’s personality tomorrow (10 HW points) — ideas for main idea sentences…

If you think that the person Gatsby tries to present himself as and the person he really is are different: “While Gatsby tries to make himself appear to be _, he is actually _."

If you think that the person Gatsby tries to present himself as and the person he really is are one and the same: “Gatsby presents himself to appear to be , and this is who he really is.”

PLEASE DON’T SETTLE FOR SOMETHING OBVIOUS LIKE “A NICE, AFFLUENT GUY” — TRY TO MAKE SOME INSIGHT INTO HIS PERSONALITY BASED ON THE THINKING YOU’VE DONE TODAY!

Also, be ready to hand in your books tomorrow (for a check of annotations for Ch. 4)

Due 11/1
English 11 Gamma: Review the following sections of Gatsby -- p. 48-49 (Nick's impression of Gatsby at Gatsby's party), p. 64-69 (Nick and Gatsby's conversation during the car ride to NYC), p. 78-79 (what Jordan has to say about Gatsby)

AP: Review the following sections of Words Like Loaded Pistols -- Narration, Division, Proof, Refutation, Peroration (p. 87-105); Cicero (p. 107-117); decorum (p. 119-126); Lincoln (p. 137-146). Lincoln questions due Monday.

HEX: Write a paragraph summarizing our conversation today (up to 20 HW points, graded). Study your vocabulary: synonyms, antonyms, cognates, roots and languages of origin

Due 10/31
English 11 Gamma and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 4 of Gatsby (Will I ask for your books to check annotations? An interesting question...)

AP: Read and annotate pp. 118-146 of Words Like Loaded Pistols

HEX: read and annotate the selection from the epic of Gilgamesh

Due Oct 28
HEX: read and annotate the selection from Gilgamesh, making 3 written annotations per page (1 HW point per full page with 3 annotations). What would the "spikes" be in our Freitag diagram? What are the conflicts that produce tension? How are they resolved? (What can we then say about the overall narrative arc, tension, and conflict of the epic as a whole?)

AP: Read and annotate pp. 118-146 of Words Like Loaded Pistols for MONDAY (you may get additional HW tomorrow, however)...

English 11 Delta: no new HW

Due Oct 27
AP: Read and annotate pp. 73-117 of Words Like Loaded Pistols. Pay special attention to the sections on "Proof" and "Refutation," the passage on Frederick Douglass (in the section on "Peroration," I think), and Cicero (yay Classics!)

Eng 11 (both classes): use this video --
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXnqogOKicc&feature=youtu.behttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXnqogOKicc&feature=youtu.be -- to help you with the "Class work" side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #3

Due Oct 26
English 11 Delta and Gamma: read and annotate Ch. 3 of Gatsby

HEX: Complete the "class work" side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise 3, using this awesome video to guide you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXnqogOKicc&feature=youtu.be

Due Oct 25
All classes: please see the two notes above for important end-of-quarter information

English 11, both classes: read and annotate Ch. 3 of Gatsby

HEX: do what you need to do to learn the story and characters in the epic of Gilgamesh (shmoop and wikipedia are not bad places to go)

AP: On a piece of paper, complete #3 on p. 94 of Everything's An Argument, AND take a short field trip to Ms. Raskin's room. Find an example of statistics being deployed in a misleading way, and explain: 1. what argument the statistic is being used to support (note: this is not always immediately obvious), 2. what the statistic is, 3. how it is being used in a misleading way

Due Oct 24
HEX: Revised, typed, double-spaced, edited and proofread 3rd ("final") draft of essay due ON PAPER at the start of class (up to 30 major assignment points)

English 11 Gamma and Delta: read and annotate Ch. 3 of Gatsby; complete both sides of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #2 (if not completed and turned in already; video links below for the class work side)

English 11 Gamma: Complete figurative language sheet from Thursday's class

English 11 Delta: Complete choice writing assignment (write something original in the genre of your choice about the topic of your choice; spend 30 minutes on it)

AP: read and annotate "Logos" chapter from Everything's An Argument

Due Oct 21
AP: Construct an outline of the "Pathos" chapter of Everything's An Argument; read and annotate the chapter if you have not already

HEX: Typed, double-spaced, revised second draft of The Book Thief essay due ON PAPER at the start of class (20 HW points)

Due Oct 20
English 11 Gamma: choice writing assignment, class work side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #2 -- videos below

English 11 Delta: class work side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #2 -- videos below; finished annotations (3 written notes per page) of Ch. 2 of Gatsby

AP: read and annotate the "Pathos" chapter of Everything's An Argument

Sentence Diagramming Exercise #2, Class Work Videos:
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Sorry it's in 3 parts, but my iPhone 4s doesn't have as much memory as it used to...
PS: to become "inured" to something is to become used to it, immune to it, no longer affected by it...

HEX: typed, revised, double-spaced, paper copy of Book Thief essay (20 HW points)

Due Oct 19
HEX: SDE #2 HW side

Due Oct 18
HEX: Rough draft of essay (20 HW points)

AP: Come ready to discuss the Ethos chapter of Everything's An Argument; have you picked up the Pathos chapter yet?

English 11 Gamma: no new HW

Due Oct 17
English 11 Gamma: Use the video (see link below) to help you with the class work side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1; Complete Choice Writing assignment; read and annotate Ch. 2 of Gatsby (3 written notes per page)

English 11 Delta: Use the video at this link -- https://youtu.be/PaDj94h3PwQ -- to help you with the class work side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1; read and annotate Ch. 2 of Gatsby (3 written notes per page)

AP: Boy, it sure will be funny when I give you guys a quiz on Pathos that's open-note for everyone who picked up the reading... just kidding, we'll figure something out. I'll email you if I come up with another assignment.

HEX: do all necessary research and planning for your essay on why people tell stories and The Book Thief -- come to class on Monday with a thesis, all the quotations and details (with page numbers!) you plan to use, and an outline of your essay (20 HW points) -- we will have drafting time and peer conferences during our double period on Monday

Due Oct 14
AP: Complete #1 on p. 67 and #3 on p. 68 of EAA (no need for essay or pictures for #3, just ID the famous person and compose the snarky ad line) (10 HW points)

English 11 Delta: Complete the Class Work side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1, using the video at: https://youtu.be/PaDj94h3PwQ. Yeah, it's super low-tech video, I know. Do your best.

Due Oct 13
AP: On a piece of paper, complete #4 and #6 on pp. 36-37 (ignore the bit about "stasis questions" in #6) (10 HW points). Review your reading and annotations of Ch. 3 ("Ethos"). Be prepared to talk and/or write about: the 3 ways the text suggests that arguments based on character can work.

HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1 (HW side) (10 HW points); rough draft of essay due Monday (finish #3 in the warm-up before starting your draft!)

English 11 Gamma: Complete the Class Work side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1, using the video at: https://youtu.be/PaDj94h3PwQ. Yeah, it's super low-tech video, I know. Do your best.

English 11 Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 2 of Gatsby (3 written annotations per page)

Due Oct 12
English 11 Delta: read and annotate Ch. 2 of Gatsby (I will ask you to turn your books in for a check of annotations for Ch. 1 either Wednesday or Thursday)

English 11 Gamma: read and annotate Ch. 2 of Gatsby (it is highly likely I will ask you to leave your books behind for an annotations check on Wednesday -- 1 HW point for full each page in Ch. 1 with 3 written annotations -- just saying...)

HEX: Due at the start of class on Wednesday: discussion prep notes (10 HW points), notes from today's discussion (up to 10 CW points), discussion reflection -- 1 paragraph summarizing the discussion, 1 paragraph exploring an issue or question from the discussion you find interesting (up to 20 HW points, graded for clarity, thoroughness, and thoughtfulness)

Due Oct 11
English 11 Gamma: read and annotate Ch. 2 of Gatsby (I will ask you to turn your books in for a check of annotations for Ch. 1 either Tuesday or Wednesday)

HEX: Prepare for a Socratic discussion Monday on the question "What can The Book Thief tell us about why people tell stories?" On a piece of paper, identify passages and quotes, make notes, write questions to ask, etc... (10 HW points)

AP: Read and annotate the selections you received from the introductory chapter of Everything's An Argument, and the chapter on ethos

Due Oct 7
AP: Come in tomorrow with hard copies of 3 advertisements that exhibit ethos, 3 that exhibit logos, and 3 that exhibit pathos. (15 HW points)

HEX: finish your practice labeling and diagramming

English 11 Delta: read and annotate Ch. 1 of Gatsby (3 written notes per page); finish the character sheet you began in class yesterday

Due Oct 6
AP: Watch at least 15 minutes of the vice presidential debate. Please answer the following 5 questions on a sheet of paper, to be submitted Thursday for 10 HW points (2-3 sentences per question is fine):
1. How is this debate similar to or different from the first presidential debate in tone?
2 + 3. For each candidate, select a response or rebuttal (argument against) he makes against a claim made by his opponent, and explain what he is trying to do, and how he is trying to do it.
4. We talked a little in class today about warrants -- ideas that must be true in order for the claim made in an argument to be true. What is one claim made by one of the candidates, and what warrants can you think of that underlie it?
5. Do you think the VP debate is a useful tool for helping voters decide whom to vote for? Why or why not?

English 11 Gamma: finish today's character sheet (and write your name on it!)

English 11 Delta: read and annotate (3 written notations per page) pp. 5-21 Gatsby

HEX: finish your practice labeling and diagramming

Due Oct 5
English 11 Gamma: read and annotate (3 written notations per page) pp. 5-21 Gatsby. Please note that we're about to start moving through the text more quickly -- please have your annotations completed for tomorrow; they will likely be collected before the end of the week.

English 11 Delta: see below

Due Oct 4
AP: see previous assignment (lots of good talk about rhetoric and ethics today!)

HEX: no new HW

English 11 Gamma and Delta: read and annotate pp. 5-21 of Gatsby;
Due Oct 3 (October -- How did that happen?! We're still just getting started...)

AP: Read and annotate pp. 45-80 of WLLP, being ready to talk about where and how you see...
--ethos being used (either successfully or unsuccessfully) by any of the examples in pp. 48-55,
--logos being used by any of the examples in 56-65 (and what makes them successful),
--pathos being used by Richard Nixon in pp. 65-71
--all three being used in Satan's conversations in pp. 72-80
Also, finish reading the rhetorical analysis sample essays and score explanations you received in class today, including the essay overview

English 11 Gamma and Delta: Officially, your homework is to read and annotate pp. 1-21 (Chapter 1) of Gatsby, with at least three written annotations per page (each page will be eventually worth 1 HW point). In practice, we will talk about this chapter for a couple of days -- there are several characters we need to establish an understanding of. For this weekend, read the whole chapter, annotating anything that comes to your mind.

HEX: Do the work you have committed to doing for your group

Due Sept 30
AP: HW is for Monday

HEX: compose a paragraph about lives, stories, and the choices we make when we compose or tell stories (use the thinking we did today in class)

English 11 Delta: Complete the "Meet The Great Gatsby" sheet you received in class today (both sides!)

Due September 29
AP: Read and annotate pp. 1-44 of Words Like Loaded Pistols

English 11 Delta: complete your HW from the other night, if you haven't yet

English 11 Gamma: Complete the "meet your book" activity (20 class work points)

HEX: compose a paragraph about lives, stories, and the choices we make when we compose or tell stories (use the thinking we did today in class)

Due September 28
English 11 Delta: See Sept. 27

English 11 Gamma: See Sept. 27, if you did not successfully demonstrate completion of your assignment today

HEX: Please find the passage you are assigned to, and come to class prepared (with notes in your reading notes) to discuss the questions below with the other members of your group (please let me know if there are irresolvable personality conflicts within your group)...
Passage 1 -- Prologue: Sarah, Kayla, Grace, Chloe, Tate
1. Why does Death talk so much about "distraction," and why is it important to him (for lack of a better pronoun)?
2. What does he need distraction from, and why does this bother him so much?
3. Why does he feel the need to share this with us, do you think?
4. What fascinates Death about Liesel's book, which he retrieves? Why do you think these things fascinate him?
5. What does he want to tell us a story (see 15), based on this passage? What is the "something" he wants to show us (15), and why?

Passage 2 -- The Standover Man: Nathan, Dyllan, Thomas, Theo
1. How does Max make the paper for this book?
2. Explain why this is symbolically significant? (Hint: whose story was it to begin with? whose story is it now?)
3. Also explain the symbolism of the words of the original story still being visible -- what does this remind us about Max's situation?
4. Who are the different kinds of "standover men" that Max has encountered -- are they good? bad? both? What does it mean, literally and figuratively, to be a standover man?
5. Why does Max portray himself as a bird? What does this show us about his perspective of himself in the book?
6. What is the effect of receiving and reading this book on Liesel? What does it mean for Death to compare the book to "a beautiful itch"?

Passage 3 -- The Word Shaker: Khiya, Anakin, Daud, Adrien, Pascale
We discussed in class the allegorical nature of this story (an allegory is a story in which each significant element is symbolic of a broader real-life situation that the story symbolizes as a whole). Explain the allegory. Pay special attention to the climax and ending of the story.

Passage 4 -- Epilogue: Adrianna, Ciara, Isaiah, Aubrey, Jake
1. Why has telling the story made Death so tired, do you think?
2. Before describing the rest of Liesel's life (but after describing the moment of her death), Death repeats two lines from the Prologue (544, 15). Why do you think Death does this?
3. Why does Death keep certain stories from the "unluckiest, unlikeliest" places and allow them to distract him (549)?
4. What does Death show to Liesel when he meets her for the last time? What is its name? Is it the same as the book we've been reading, or a different one?
5. . "The Standover Man" and "The Word Shaker" passages show us stories within the story. In what way does this passage also do that?
6. What do you think Death has wanted to show us in showing us this story?

Follow-ups for everyone to consider: Why is Death "haunted by humans"? If The Book Thief begins at the front cover and ends at the back cover, why are the Prologue, Epilogue, and middle parts of the story set off from each other? How many stories within stories are there here?

Due September 27
HEX: Final draft (typed, revised, double-spaced, edited, proofread, MLA format, on paper) of figurative language analysis paragraph due at the start of class. Include your previous draft, peer conference sheet, and -- if you're up for it -- packet of graphic organizers behind the rubric and final draft

HEX FYI: Your 1st tutorial grade will go to zero if you have not had your first tutorial meeting by the end of the coming week (you will still receive full credit when the meeting happens, but I don't feel comfortable leaving it blank any more)

AP: Watch or listen to at least 25 minutes of tonight's presidential debate. Record 5 quotes from each candidate. For each quote, write what you think s/he was attempting to accomplish by saying this, and -- if not immediately obvious -- how (20 HW points)

English 11 -- both sections (due Wednesday for Gamma):
Watch the "1920s" episode of Crash Course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_2162264637&feature=iv&src_vid=GCQfMWAikyU&v=VfOR1XCMf7A(full text at http://www.allreadable.com/d4618KRw)
Come to class ready to answer the following questions:
Ean, Osagie, Antwan, Kim: How did debt help fuel the national economy of the 1920s?
Elayna, Reggie, Ayende: What are two ways white, Protestant Americans demonstrated a fear of people of other races in the 1920s?
Daryl, Morgan, JJ: How did new technology in the home help create more personal freedom for middle- and upper-class women? (Why didn't it help lower-class women?)
Josh S., Aliyah, David K., Noah: What was the "Harlem Renaissance"?
Marcus, Maddie, Baily: How did Prohibition help fuel the rise of organized crime?
Roman, Emanuel, Bianca: How did women's fashion change in the 1920s? (You may have to go beyond the video to do this, but a simple web search will give you good answers)
Khori, Josh W., David S., Layla: Rich people got richer; poor people stayed poor in the 1920s -- how come? (How did richer people get more money, for the most part?)
Alex, Alessandro, Sabria, Knick: What made it possible for more and more people to own cars in the 1920s? How did cars change American life in the 1920s?
Kelly, Rickee: What significance did science and/or "pseudoscience" (fake science -- things that claim to be scientific but aren't) have in American society in the 1920s?
Mr. Day: How did American popular music and dance change in the 1920s, and what was the source of this change?


Due September 26
AP: Final draft (typed, revised, double-spaced, edited, proofread, MLA format, on paper) of Orwell essay (include all previous drafts, peer conference sheet, and brainstorming) -- rubric on top, then final draft, then other materials in reverse chronological order

HEX: Re-read and annotate pp. 1-15, 223-238, 442-455, 543-550 of The Book Thief. We will start our conversation about why people tell stories -- and what we can learn about this from The Book Thief -- on Monday. Revise your paragraph on figurative language in a selected passage in The Book Thief based on the feedback you received in class today.

English 11 Gamma and Delta: Final draft (typed, revised, double-spaced, edited, proofread, paper copy) of Catcher essay due at the start of class. Please staple the rubric and editing and proofreading sheet(s) to the top of the final draft, and then include all earlier essay materials (first draft, second draft, essay prompt, peer conference sheet...) in reverse order below.

Due September 23
HEX: rough draft of figurative language analysis paragraph (on a passage from The Book Thief of your choice) due -- on paper -- on Friday (20 HW points). HEY -- we're going to do peer conferences on Friday. I will choose the questions for you. They will be on a sheet of paper, all ready for you. We will have to work quickly. Be ready to go once you come in the door.

AP: Final draft of Orwell essay -- typed, double-spaced, revised, edited and proofread, in MLA format -- due on paper at the start of class (with rough draft and peer conference sheet)

English 11 Delta: typed, revised, double-spaced second draft of Catcher essay due, on paper, at the start of class (30 HW points)

Due September 22
English 11 Gamma: typed, revised, double-spaced second draft of Catcher essay due, on paper, at the start of class (30 HW points)

Due September 21
English 11 Delta: rough draft of all 3 portions of the Catcher writing project due tomorrow, on paper, at the start of class (30 HW points)

AP: Revise essay (final draft due on paper on Friday)

HEX: rough draft of figurative language analysis paragraph (on a passage from The Book Thief of your choice) due -- on paper -- on Friday (20 HW points)

Due September 20
AP: no homework (!)

English 11 Gamma: rough draft of all 3 portions of the Catcher writing project due tomorrow

HEX: complete graphic organizer for a passage from The Book Thief that you choose yourself (1 paragraph to 1 page in length) (Need help? The part where Liesel confronts the mayor's wife -- pp. 252-3 -- is a good one)

Due September 19
AP: Rough draft of essay on Orwell (20 HW points)

English 11 Gamma and Delta: Rough draft of the Holden portion of Catcher essay (20 HW points for at least 3 paragraphs; no credit guaranteed for any less than 3 paragraphs)

HEX: Complete figurative language graphic organizer for the passage narrating the Walter Kugler vs. Max Vandenburg boxing match (see packet)

Due September 16
HEX: Figurative language poster
Sarah -- allegory; Kayla -- allusion; Grace -- personification; Chloe -- litotes; Nathan -- apostrophe; Dyllan -- metonymy; Thomas -- euphemism; Theo -- hyperbole; Khiya -- understatement; Anakin -- irony; Daud -- metaphor; Adrien -- metonymy; Adrianna -- simile; Ciara -- oxymoron; Isaiah -- paradox; Aubrey -- pun; Pascale -- synecdoche; Jake -- synesthesia; Tate -- metaphor

English 11 Delta: Complete the brief "Game On" exercise near the bottom of the first page of the essay prompt you received today

Due September 15
AP: Be ready to discuss the following questions tomorrow (make some notes in your Reading section):
1. What is Orwell's thesis, in "Politics and the English Language"?
2. What's at stake in how we use language? (What do we stand to gain or lose in the ways that we use language)
3. Why is this -- how we use language -- a political issue for Orwell?

English 11 Delta: Do some thinking about this: If Holden wants to badly to be a child, why does he spend so much time doing such "grown-up" things?

English 11 Gamma: Complete the brief "Game On" exercise near the bottom of the first page of the essay prompt you received today

Due September 14

HEX: Typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, proofread MLA format 3rd ("final") draft of morality essay. Staple, in this order: rubric and checklist, 3rd draft, 2nd draft, peer conference sheet -- detached from packet!, first draft, essay packet and warm-up sheet. To receive full credit and be on time for class, you will have your essay ready to hand in on arrival in the classroom.

English 11 Gamma: Do some thinking about this: If Holden wants to badly to be a child, why does he spend so much time doing such "grown-up" things?

Due September 13
AP: completed multiple choice packet with brief reflections on all incorrect answers; read and annotate "Politics and the English Language"; respond in writing to reading questions on "Politics and the English Language"

English 11 Gamma and Delta: written responses to reading questions for Ch. 20-26 of Catcher; choice writing assignment

HEX: typed, double-spaced, revised second draft of personal morality essay (20 HW points)

Due September 12
English 11 Gamma: review Ch. 20-22 of Catcher; complete choice writing assignment (will be collected Tuesday)

English 11 Delta: review Ch. 23-26 of Catcher (revised choice writing assignment, Ch. 20-26 reading questions for Catcher will be collected Tuesday

HEX: rough draft of personal morality essay (peer conferences on Monday)

Due September 9
HEX: complete essay warm-up and review sheet (PS: Immanuel Kant was a German philosopher who came up with a very rigorous form of moral absolutism)

English 11 Delta: review Ch. 20-22 of Catcher

Due September 8
AP: Compose a 2-paragraph reflection on today's Socratic discussion. Paragraph 1: Summarize today's conversation, using your notes. Paragraph 2: select one issue, question, or idea from today's discussion that you find especially intriguing, explain why it interests you, and explore it further via your own thinking and writing -- be thorough, thoughtful, and accurate (questions we selected beforehand but did not discuss are okay, too) (20 HW points)

Due September 7
English 11 Delta: review Ch. 9-14 of Catcher (p. 66-117)

English 11 Gamma: review Ch. 15-19 of Catcher (p. 117-165)

HEX: Add to yesterday's HW -- describe and explain another example of something being right in one situation and wrong in another; explain what makes the difference (between the action being right in one case and wrong in the other) (10 HW points)

Due September 6
English 11 Gamma: review Ch. 9-14 of Catcher (p. 66-117)

HEX: Compose 1 paragraph explaining how you go about making decisions between right and wrong; bring The Book Thief

AP: Complete the 1984 Test-Like Artifact you received in class today

Due September 2
HEX: identify which sections of text you need to review in pp. 1-204 of The Book Thief in order to discuss Hans Hubermann's choice to take in Max and hide him; review those sections of text

AP: review the ending chapters of the "Gettysburg Address" book; what parts of 1984 should we pay attention to in order to think about the ways in which "words matter" in this book?

English 11 Delta: review Ch. 1-8 of Catcher (p. 1-66)

Due September 1
AP: review the rest of the "Gettysburg Address" book; review and annotate (if you haven't already) the article on Hillary Clinton's speech last week; bring 1984

English 11 Delta: typed second (aka "final") draft of "Theme for English B" poem (bring your poem packet to attach the rubric); bring Catcher

English 11 Gamma: Review Ch. 1-8 of Catcher (pp. 1-66)

Due August 31
English 11 Delta: rough draft of "Theme for English B" poem (20 HW points); bring The Catcher in the Rye

English 11 Gamma: typed second (aka "final") draft of "Theme for English B" poem (bring your poem packet to attach the rubric); bring Catcher;

AP: review the rest of the "Gettysburg Address" book; review and annotate (if you haven't already) the article on Hillary Clinton's speech last week; bring 1984

HEX: bring Absolutely True Diary; bring The Book Thief (1st chunk will be pp. 1-204ish, focusing on Hans' choice to take in Max)

Due August 30
English 11 Gamma: rough draft of "Theme for English B" poem (20 HW points); bring The Catcher in the Rye

HEX: bring The Absolutely True Diary... and The Book Thief; final draft of "I Hear [My Neighborhood] Singing" poem due (up to 15 major assignment points) -- have your rubric, final draft, and rough draft stapled together (preferably in that order) before you enter the room on Tuesday

AP: review pp. 126-186 of the "Gettysburg Address" graphic novel; review (and annotate, if you haven't yet) the Slate.com article on Hillary Clinton's speech from last week

Due August 29
All classes: bring your notebooks/binders to class on Monday so that we can get them set up and organized (20 HW points)

HEX: Complete brainstorming for and rough draft of "I Hear [My Neighborhood] Singing" poem (20 HW points)

English 11: Respond in writing to class work questions in "Theme for English B" packet

AP: review the next 3 chapters of the "Gettysburg Address" book (pp. 81-125); read and annotate the Slate article you received in class today

Due August 26
All classes: completed and signed course contract form (10 HW points)







Due June 1
ALL CLASSES: BE READY TO SUBMIT YOUR Q4 WARM-UPS ON WEDNESDAY

AP: Continue work on final projects

English 11: prepare for exam essays and quote ID

HEX: Select 5 quotations from anywhere in The Life of Pi, and 5 quotations from our readings in the Hebrew Bible (Genesis: 1-4, 6-9, 11:1-9, 12:1-3, 13, 16-22, 27-28, 32-35; Exodus: 1-24), that you think illustrate something significant in the books (theme, character insight, plot point...) Write out at least the page number and the location of the quote on the page -- if not the entire quote -- along with a 1-3 sentence explanation of why you think the quotation is significant (quotations can be narration or dialogue). Use your annotations to guide you (20 HW points).

Due May 31

AP: work on your final project. BE READY TO SUBMIT YOUR Q4 WARM-UPS ON WEDNESDAY

English 11: Select 10 quotations from anywhere in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn that you think illustrate something significant in the book (theme, character insight, plot point...) Write out at least the page number and the location of the quote on the page -- if not the entire quote -- along with a 1-3 sentence explanation of why you think the quotation is significant (quotations can be narration or dialogue). Use your annotations to guide you (20 HW points). Begin preparatory work on the exam essays (character dialogue, essay on how the literature we've read this year helps you think about what it means for you to be an American). BRING YOUR GATSBY BOOK ON TUESDAY TO SUBMIT FOR A FINAL ANNOTATIONS CHECK. BRING YOUR NOTEBOOKS ON WEDNESDAY TO SUBMIT YOUR Q4 WARM-UPS.

HEX: Select 5 quotations from anywhere in Othello, and 5 quotations from anywhere in Books 1-12 of the Odyssey, that you think illustrate something significant in the books (theme, character insight, plot point...) Write out at least the page number and the location of the quote on the page -- if not the entire quote -- along with a 1-3 sentence explanation of why you think the quotation is significant (quotations can be narration or dialogue). Use your annotations to guide you (20 HW points). Begin preparatory work on the Love and Poetry essay on the exam. BRING YOUR OTHELLO BOOK ON TUESDAY TO SUBMIT FOR A FINAL ANNOTATIONS CHECK. BRING YOUR NOTEBOOKS ON WEDNESDAY TO SUBMIT YOUR Q4 WARM-UPS.

Due May 27
English 11:
Select 10 quotations from anywhere in The Catcher in the Rye that you think illustrate something significant in the book (theme, character insight, plot point...) Write out at least the page number and the location of the quote on the page -- if not the entire quote -- along with a 1-3 sentence explanation of why you think the quotation is significant (quotations can be narration or dialogue). Use your annotations to guide you (20 HW points).

AP: Work on your final projects

HEX: Final draft of Othello DBQ due (60 major assignment points)

Due May 26
HEX: SDE 27 HW; read and annotate Book 12 of the Odyssey; revised, typed, hard copy 2nd draft of Othello DBQ (20 HW points)

AP: Prepare to complete your final project (either by working on it, or by clearing your mental decks by working on things for other classes)

Due May 25
HEX: 1st draft of Othello DBQ (30 HW points); review Odyssey Books 9-11

English 11: Select 10 quotations from anywhere in The Great Gatsby that you think illustrate something significant in the book (theme, character insight, plot point...) Write out at least the page number and the location of the quote on the page -- if not the entire quote -- along with a 1-3 sentence explanation of why you think the quotation is significant (quotations can be narration or dialogue). Use your annotations to guide you (20 HW points).

AP: Bring to class a plan for your final project to share and discuss with Mr. Day

Due May 24
AP:
1. For the items you came up with in your homework (see the wiki), please -- in writing, with a partner if you would like -- describe the way each strategy you identified in your homework works to resist or subvert the traditional male gaze -- treat each of the images in pp. 14-16 of the Farber article as its own strategy. Use the additional Cindy Sherman pictures to help you for her (last image on p. 16, with lots of text that follows)
2. Again, in writing, as above: the images on the last page of the Farber article ostensibly show women who are taking control, possibly even taking control of the gaze, in making their arguments as advertising.a. How does each do this?b. Does each truly show a woman successfully appropriating/resisting/subverting the gaze? What do you think?

Due May 23
AP:
--Review pp. 57-64 of Ways of Seeing. On a sheet of paper, and in writing...
List (and be prepared to explain in class) the means by which John Berger sees painters (and their subjects) paint (and succeed in being painted as) naked women, rather than objectified nudes (there are at least 3 or 4, depending on how you count)
--Review all of "Looking and the Gaze" (whose author's name is Allen Farber). On your sheet of paper, and in writing...
List (and be prepared to explain in class) ways in which, according to this text, feminist art can challenge or subvert the traditional (and masculine) gaze of the viewer, with special attention to the explication of Cindy Sherman's photography.

HEX: Review/finish perusing and taking notes on all sources for the DBQ. Monday will be a work day in which you assemble your ideas to construct your written response. There may or may not be computers available to you.

English 11 (both classes): On Monday you will have an open book, open note test on our work with The Great Gatsby. FYI, at least one item on the test will be a quote identification, to help you ready yourselves for the Quote ID section on the final exam. No, I will not give you a quote bank in advance; there may or may not be multiple quotes to choose from. Here are the topics/ideas/themes brainstormed by the classes today as to what might appear on the exam (if you come to class on Monday prepared to think about and discuss these, you will be in good shape):
--chronologies (order of events in Gatsby's and Nick's lives versus how Nick tells the story; timeline of events, timeline of when we learn about events)
--characters' relationships with each other
--new money vis-a-vis old money
--lies (Gatsby's life, spouses cheating on each other, Daisy and Tom apparently not feeling guilty over what happens to Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Jay Gatsby)
--our dreams and goals in life, and how we try to realize them, and how realistic we are about them
--do we live in our pasts, our presents, or our futures? Living in the future vis-a-vis living in the present vis-a-vis living in the past
--Gatsby's life, death, and dreams
--Do our dreams drive our lives?
--What Gatsby, Nick, and Fitzgerald think about people's dreams and their attainability
--How Nick's feelings -- about life, and other characters -- evolve
--How Nick becomes more sociable
--Owl-Eyes' role in the story
--Nick's interactions at different parties
--Gatsby's back story
--Daisy and Tom vis-a-vis Daisy and Gatsby
--Why Nick writes the way he does (big words, complicated sentences, lots of figures of speech)
--Women's lives (rich, white women's lives) in the 1920s
--Nick as participant and watcher -- someone who is "there but not there"
--See item #3 for the May 20 wiki entry...


Due May 20
HEX: Read and annotate Book 11 of the Odyssey (we will not be talking about this tomorrow; I just want to keep you moving forward with your reading). View and take notes on the "Shakespeare Uncovered" video for the DBQ (web address is in the packet; remember to focus on the designated minutes; take notes as you did today on the Olivier clip in class)

English 11 Epsilon AND Eta:
1. Complete SDE 27 HW
2. Play this video game a few times: http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2013/05/the_great_gatsby_the_video_game_can_you_attain_the_american_dream.html. Refresh the page when it asks you "Try again?", rather than clicking on "Try Again," or it will glitch. Use the "m" and "n" keys to row the boat (arrow keys on some keyboards). Be ready to talk about these questions on Friday (no need to write responses): How does the game literally connect to the last few sentences of Fitzgerald's novel? How does it figuratively connect?
3. On p. 154, Nick tells us, "'They're a rotten crowd,' I shouted across the lawn. 'You're worth the whole damn bunch put together.' I've always been glad I said that. It was the only compliment I ever gave him, because I disapproved of him from beginning to end." What Nick says to Gatsby and he says to us seem to be contradictory. On a separate sheet of paper, respond to the following: What does Nick mean when he -- you know what? Never mind. I'll just put this question on the test instead.

Due May 19
HEX: read and annotate the articles in the DBQ packet (Documents 4, 5, 9, 10). You may be discussing these and looking at the pictorial sources in small groups after you finish your sentence diagramming work on Thursday.

English 11 Eta: On a separate sheet of paper, answer in writing the 17 questions on the last few page of Gatsby. They are in chronological order. Use your thinking to follow Nick's thinking closely. This will be collected Friday, but you will have other homework Thursday night, so do it now.

AP: Respond in writing to any three of the questions below, plus the last one. Working definition of "objectifying": not seeing the person as a person with their own desires, thoughts, feelings, etc. (per SWu).
1. Is this (sexual objectification, especially portrayed in works of art) not the same for men?
2. Shame and display in objectification? Simultaneously? How?
3. How to resist this dynamic (of objectification of women in art and society)?
4. How to be beautiful without being a sex object? (What does "being beautiful in a different way" look like?)
5. What about paintings by women?
6. What about images of men?
7. Can we say objectification is always bad?
8. How can we tell if an image -- especially an image of a women -- is not objectifying?
9. Is physical attraction to another always automatically objectifying?
10. Is an image of a person (or a woman) automatically objectifying?
11. What does Berger's argument offer us in terms of ways to address these questions?

Due May 18
AP: Read and annotate Ch. 3 of Ways of Seeing (pp. 45-64). On a piece of paper, respond to the following questions:
1. What is the argument that Berger is making? How can you tell?
2. How does his thinking in this chapter build on the ideas we discussed in Ch. 2? How are their arguments connected?
3. What do you find particularly striking/intriguing/interesting/disagreeable in this chapter? How come?
Two HW XC points: Look at the citations for each of the early modern figure paintings in Ch. 2 (p. 39 and 43). 1. How does the classical subject matter of each painting support the arguments we discussed in class today? 2. Does knowing these paintings better alter what you think the argument might be -- and, if so, how so? If you write more than 1-2 sentences for each question, you are doing too much.

English 11 Epsilon:
1. Finish answering the questions on the homework question sheet that we worked on today (you should have all but 11e-g done at this point).
2. Come to class prepared to talk about what kinds of things you would put on an exam for Gatsby, if you had been teaching our class (be prepared to discuss actual content, in particular things that we've focused on in class)
3. Play this video game a few times: http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2013/05/the_great_gatsby_the_video_game_can_you_attain_the_american_dream.html
How does it literally connect to the last few sentences of Fitzgerald's novel? How does it figuratively connect?


Due May 17
HEX: read and annotate Book 10 of the Odyssey (and 9, if you haven't yet, though we won't be discussing them for another few days). Come to class prepared to perform your Othello speech.

English 11 Epsilon: read and annotate the rest of Ch. 9 of Gatsby. Probably on a separate sheet of paper, answer #1-10 from the list of questions you received today.

English 11 Eta: read and annotate the rest of Ch. 9 of Gatsby. Probably on a separate sheet of paper, answer all questions from the list you received in class today.

Due May 16
HEX: come to class prepared to perform your Othello speech

English 11 (both classes): read and annotate through the section break on p. 174 in Ch. 9 of Gatsby

AP: back to work. I hope the rest of your AP exams went well. There are two assignments here for Monday.
1. Starship Troopers (15 HW points)
a. The fact that the story is made out of well-known tropes, many of them cliche, is one of the ways this text can be identified as a satire. On a piece of paper, list 10 tropes -- familiar narrative elements that recur in multiple stories -- present in Starship Troopers (e.g. "the girl who dies for love," "the black guy dies first," "burial at sea"...). See how many you can do on your own before resorting to the enormous laundry list at http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/StarshipTroopers. Ray, Elias, Teddy, and Kayla, I know I said 15 in class, but I don't want this to turn into an exercise in copying things off of the tvtropes list.
b. On the same piece of paper, list 5 different things that are satirized in or by this film (you can include different types of movies, too). Fun fact: one of the things being satirized is actually the book the film is (sort-of) based on, Starship Troopers, by Robert Heinlein.
2. Read the second essay (pp. 35-43) of Ways of Seeing (it consists only of pictures, no words). Be aware that, as with our conversation about Diz's portrayal in Starship Troopers, the conversations in the week ahead of us have to do with women's bodies and the ways they are seen and portrayed in art and the media. Answer the following questions on a piece of paper (15 HW points):
a. What is the argument being made here? What makes you think so?
b. How does Berger go about making this argument -- what strategies do you see him using to convey this argument?
c. How is the experience of reading and making meaning from this text different from reading a traditional essay?

Due May 13 (Happy birthday to me!)
English 11 Epsilon: SDE 26 HW

Due May 12
HEX: SDE 26 HW; practice your Othello speech (performances on Thursday for those who are ready, Friday for everyone else)

English 11 Eta: no new HW. Have you turned in your book for an annotations check?

Due May 11
AP: Get enough sleep on Monday night and Tuesday night. Bring food and drink to the exam (and writing tools!), and dress in layers. Expect the unexpected. Do your best (it is by definition impossible to do more, so please don't worry about that, and you don't want to do any less -- because, in the words of Vanilla Ice, "Anything less than the best is a felony").

Due May 10
HEX: Practice your Othello speech. Many members of the class need to lock in their memorization, and work to be more dramatic.

English 11: Read and annotate Ch. 8 of Gatsby.

Due May 9
AP: 1) sleep; 2) identify 3 current events, texts, or issues that might plausibly show up on Wednesday's AP exam, 3) peruse the satire prompt in your packet of rhetorical analysis prompts. Enjoy Captain America: Civil War if you're going to see it; it's supposed to be good.

English 11 Eta: read and annotate the rest of Ch. 7 of Gatsby (pp. 138-145)

English 11 Epsilon: read and annotate the rest of Ch. 7 of Gatsby (pp. 133-145)

HEX: Practice your now-memorized speech from Othello at least five times -- graded performances start on Tuesday?

Due May 6
English 11 Epsilon and Eta: SDE 25 HW; Eta -- bring IR book and Gatsby tomorrow

AP: study for your vocabulary quiz tomorrow; make use of the extra essay prompts as exam prep as you see fit

HEX: add tones of voice to your Othello speech line-by-line sheet

Due May 5
English 11 Eta: Read and annotate Gatsby through p. 129

ENGLISH 11 EPSILON: DROP OFF YOUR BOOKS FOR AN ANNOTATIONS CHECK!

HEX: Memorize your Othello speech (20 HW points); SDE 25 HW

AP: Read and annotate the first two prompts and sets of sources you received in a packet today; study your vocabulary (matching test/quiz Friday). Tomorrow's class will feature 0-1 actual essays...

May the Fourth be with you!
AP: study vocabulary, bring uncollected assignments (one on TNH, one a multiple choice packet) on Wednesday

Due May 3
English 11: read and annotate the rest of Ch. 6

HEX: Work to have your Othello speech memorized by the midway point of tomorrow's class (20 HW points)

Due May (how did that happen?!) 2
AP: Complete the multiple choice packet you received today in 50 minutes. Check your answers. Come to tutorial to review any items you have questions about.

English 11: Finish reading Ch. 5 of Gatsby. Read and annotate up through the top of p. 101 in Ch. 6.

HEX: Complete the "line" and "emotion/desire" columns in your line-by-line sheet

Due April 29
English 11 Epsilon and Eta: SDE 24 HW (Eta: bring a book for independent reading tomorrow)

HEX: Select a speech of at least 12 lines from Othello that you think is crucial to the plot, or to understanding and the character who speaks it, spoken by a character you find interesting. Write it out twice, and answer the following questions in writing:
1. Identify the speaker -- who says this quote?
2. Identify the audience -- to whom is s/he speaking? (if this is another character, say who; if it is him/herself, say so; if this is the reader of the book or the audience of the play; say so)
3. Context -- what is happening in the story when s/he says this?
4. Meaning -- paraphrase the quotation in your own words.
5. Significance -- Why is this quote important for the events, theme, or meaning of the story? -OR- What does this quote show about the speaking character’s personality?

AP:
1. Continue your vocabulary study.
2. Complete the fill-in-the-blank argumentative essay prompt you received in class:

On the first set of blanks, supply a quotation from the text that you think best encapsulates or expresses Hanh's argument. On the second set, paraphrase what you think his thesis is, as expressed in the quotation you chose.
3. Identify 3-5 significant rhetorical strategies or choices you see Hanh using through out his book.
4. Bring The Heart of Understanding to class tomorrow, to help you with the argumentative essay (you may certainly do some planning or outlining beforehand -- how could you not, since you constructed the prompt?)

Due April 28
English 11 Eta:
In one short paragraph, describe the idea of Gatsby that you and/or the guests of his party had as of the end of Ch. 3 (feel free to use textual evidence to support your thinking). In a second short paragraph, describe the ways that this idea has been complicated by events and conversations in Ch. 4 (to think about: the conversation in the car, lunch with Wolfsheim, Jordan's story about Daisy (and Gatsby), and Gatsby's plan). What was your and others' original impression of Gatsby? How do you see him differently now?

AP: STUDY YOUR VOCABULARY!

HEX: SDE 24 HW

Due April 27
AP:
1. Thich Nhat Hanh says that Buddhism is "a clever way to enjoy life." Please explain. (Include what one should do and how one should try to think in order to enjoy life, why one should act that way and cultivate that attitude, and how this will make life more enjoyable and less full of fear and desire.) (20 HW points)
2. Read the background material on "A Modest Proposal"; read and annotate "A Modest Proposal," using the reading questions to guide your thinking (feel free to take notes on the sheet for discussion preparation, but it will not be collected).
3. Watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZnuYKKtpxg. Be prepared to discuss it on Wednesday.

HEX: SDE 24 HW

English 11 Epsilon:
In one short paragraph, describe the idea of Gatsby that you and/or the guests of his party had as of the end of Ch. 3 (feel free to use textual evidence to support your thinking). In a second short paragraph, describe the ways that this idea has been complicated by events and conversations in Ch. 4 (to think about: the conversation in the car, lunch with Wolfsheim, Jordan's story about Daisy (and Gatsby), and Gatsby's plan). What was your and others' original impression of Gatsby? How do you see him differently now?

Due April 26
English 11 (both classes): review the second half of Ch. 4 of Gatsby

HEX: Read and annotate the "monster" speeches from Othello. Revisit the context in the original play for the ones you find most important.

Due April 25
English 11 Epsilon: Harlem Renaissance poetry analysis for 1-day-late credit

English 11 Epsilon and Eta: read and annotate Ch. 4 of Gatsby (2 HW points per page with 3 annotations)

HEX: Read and annotate the rest of 5.2 of Othello (10 pp.; 3 annotations per page)

AP: begin vocabulary study in earnest (our test vocab list (except for "aphorism") -- http://www.memrise.com/course/524593/wlpcs-ap-lang-and-comp-2014-2015/; the 4-part course that includes a lot of rhetorical vocabulary -- http://www.memrise.com/course/49008/ap-english-language-terms/)

Due April 22
English 11 (Epsilon): SDE 23 HW (10 HW points)

Due April 21
English 11 (Eta): finish reading and annotating Ch. 3 of Gatsby

AP: review the review of Andrew Hacker's book on math education (http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/education/2016/03/andrew_hacker_s_the_math_myth_is_a_great_example_of_mathematics_illiteracy.html)

HEX: finish SDE 23, read and annotate 5.1 of Othello

Due April 20
AP: complete multiple choice packet, checking your answers and writing brief reflections on items for which you selected an incorrect answer; review your work on the most recent 3 chapters of The Heart of Understanding

English 11: finish reading and annotating Ch. 3 of Gatsby

Due April 19
English 11: read and annotate through p. 47 in Gatsby.

HEX: no new homework

Due April 18
English 11: Read and annotate Ch. 2 of Gatsby (3 notes per page); finish descriptive language in-class assignment (see below); SDE 22 CW and HW
descriptive language passage choices: p. 6 third paragraph, p. 7 paragraphs 1-3, p. 7-8 transition paragraph, p. 8 first two full paragraphs, p. 9 second full paragraph, p. 11 first full paragraph, p. 17 bottom paragraph, p. 20 middle paragraph, p. 20-21 last paragraph of the chapter

HEX: Take some time to look over your comparative sonnet analysis essay, and reflect in writing on the following four questions (20 HW points):
1. Was the grade you received what you expected? Why or why not?
2. Ho much control do you feel you have in your writing, in terms of fully developing and explaining your ideas? Please explain.
3. How much control do you feel you have over your writing, in terms of grammar, spelling, and punctuation? Please explain.
4. What kind of help, instruction, or support would be most useful to you in your writing, and what resources are available to you right now to seek it?

AP:
1. Over the weekend, please read, annotate, and complete the homework assignments for the next three chapters of The Heart of Understanding (that will leave two chapters left to read). You should write less than two sides of a single-spaced sheet of paper, altogether.
2. Please also begin memorizing the definitions of the 45 words in your "AP Sentence and Rhetoric Vocabulary Notes Sheet"
3. Please also review topics, categories, and strategies you might want to write about in a rhetorical analysis essay, and the different ways to structure such an essay. (That's what we'll be writing on Monday).
4. Your homework for Wednesday will be to review your work on "Roses and Garbage," as well as the next three chapters of The Heart of Understanding, and complete an AP multiple choice packet that you will receive in class on Monday.


Due April 15
HEX: SDE 22 (both sides)

Due April 14
AP: Read and annotate and complete the standard HW assignment for the next chapter of the Thich Nhat Hanh book, which I believe is "Roses and Garbage."

HEX: Read and annotate 4.2 of Othello

Due April 13
AP: Read, annotate, and complete the recurring homework assignment for "Happy Continuation" (the next chapter to read of The Heart of Understanding)

Due April 12
English 11: no new homework

HEX: read and annotate 4.1 of Othello, if you have not already

Due April 11
English 11: complete the Tom and Daisy marriage counseling worksheet (20 points) (both classes); complete SDE 21, HW side (Eta only). The probability that you will be asked to leave your books behind on Monday is high, but not absolutely certain.

AP: read and annotate the synthesis essay packet you received today (in-class essay on Monday)

HEX: Read and annotate 4.1 of Othello (9.5pp)
Due April 8
English 11: read and annotate pp. 1-21 of Gatsby (3 notes per page, please); complete the HW side of SDE 21 (Epsilon only)

HEX: Explicate at least 10 examples of irony (usually dramatic, sometimes verbal) in 3.3 of Othello: 195-201, 205-6, 208-210, 210-211, 211-213, 220-223, 224-226, 227, 230-231, 245-246, 247-248, 249, 255-257, 259-261, 283-284, 293-294, 316-318, 343, 360-372, 374-377, 386-7, 399-400, 411, 412, 417-8, 419, 432, 434, 436-7, 445, 463-5, 490, 500, 501, 508-10, 513, 518-21. Be sure to state both the ostensible (apparent, expected) meaning, and the greater significance or actual meaning of each quotation you choose.

AP: If you haven't read and annotated the Andrew Hacker article yet, please do so (hopefully we'll talk about this tomorrow); complete HW assignments for the next 2 chapters of The Heart of Understanding ("The Way of Understanding," and "Long Live Emptiness" -- about 2/3 page per chapter, answering the questions below for each chapter) --
1. Compose a precis of Hanh’s argument in this chapter -- a summary of his logic and argument (mention examples and illustrations only for the utility they provide).
2. Explain how the new thinking in this chapter builds on the thinking of previous chapters (especially the one immediately before) -- how do these new ideas stem from and build from previous concepts and ideas he has introduced?
3. What seems new, striking, or strange to you about Hanh’s thinking here? How come? If nothing does, why does it not?

Due April 7
AP: If you haven't read and annotated the Andrew Hacker article yet, please do so (we may talk about this in the last 30 minutes of class tomorrow); complete HW assignments for 1st 2 chapters of The Heart of Understanding (about 2/3 page per chapter, answering the questions below for each chapter) --
1. Compose a precis of Hanh’s argument in this chapter -- a summary of his logic and argument (mention examples and illustrations only for the utility they provide).
2. Explain how the new thinking in this chapter builds on the thinking of previous chapters (especially the one immediately before) -- how do these new ideas stem from and build from previous concepts and ideas he has introduced?
3. What seems new, striking, or strange to you about Hanh’s thinking here? How come? If nothing does, why does it not?

English 11 Eta: no new HW

HEX: SDE 21, HW side

Due April 6
AP: Read and annotate this text, a review of Andrew Hacker's new book on math education: http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/education/2016/03/andrew_hacker_s_the_math_myth_is_a_great_example_of_mathematics_illiteracy.html. You will need a paper copy (I will print some if needed).

English 11 (Epsilon): no new HW

HEX: SDE 21, HW side

Due April 5
English 11 (both classes): read and annotate (3 notes per page, please) pp. 1-5 of The Great Gatsby

HEX: Read and annotate the remaining 11 pages of 3.3 of Othello

Due March 24
HEX: revised, typed, double-spaced second draft of comparative poem analysis essay (20 HW points)

AP: Gatsby project due on paper at the start of class on Thursday, or via Googledoc at midnight on Friday night

English 11 Eta: Poem analysis essay due at the end of class on paper

English 11 Epsilon: Poem analysis essay due at the end of the class on paper or before midnight on Friday if submitted via Googledocs

Due March 22
HEX: revised, typed, double-spaced second draft of comparative poem analysis essay due Wednesday (20 HW points)

English 11 Eta: complete rough draft of poem analysis essay, if not already completed

English 11 Epsilon: come to class tomorrow prepared to draft your poem analysis essay -- plan your essay: figure out what your main ideas will be, and what information will go in each paragraph -- mark up your notes or make lists and outlines

AP: Rough draft of rhetorical/literary analysis portion of Gatsby final project, on paper at the start of class (20 HW points)

Due March 21
English 11 Epsilon: come to class with as many of the many little questions on the essay prompt answered as possible (10 HW points)

English 11 Eta: rough draft of poem analysis essay, on paper at the start of class (20 HW points)

AP: Rough draft of rhetorical/literary analysis portion of Gatsby final project, on paper at the start of class (20 HW points)

HEX: Rough draft of comparative sonnet analysis essay, on paper at the start of class (30 HW points)

Due March 18
English 11 Eta and Epsilon: come to class tomorrow prepared to complete the Sentence Diagramming Assessment

AP: bring a rough draft of your alternative ending to The Great Gatsby (the one that shows how Gatsby would respond to disillusionment). Check your email for a procedure for tomorrow's peer conference.

HEX: Jot down answers to the following outline questions in preparation for drafting your comparative sonnet analysis essay in class tomorrow:
1. thesis statement for the essay as a whole (maybe do this one last)
2. preview of body paragraph ideas
3. main idea for body paragraph #1
4. list of evidence to use in support
5. main idea for body paragraph #2
6. list of evidence to use in support
7. main idea for body paragraph #3
8. list of evidence to use in support
For #1 and #2: see your writing notes for the Channing Tatum diagram of how to put together an introductory paragraph for an essay, and use it when you are drafting tomorrow.
In general, feel free to use -- but not overuse -- the "Both... and... however" sentence structures for your main ideas and thesis ("overuse" here would mean writing one of those for each of those four sentences)

Due March 16
HEX: read and annotate the rest of 2.3 (8 pages); read the rest of the scene summaries for the whole play before going to the play tomorrow

English 11: start answering specific questions on the writing prompt

Due the Ides of March

AP: read and annotate synthesis essay packet (rough draft of Gatsby first part of final project now due Thursday)

HEX: Read and annotate Iago's final speech in 1.3, 2.1-2; if need be, the essay outline can wait. The sentence diagramming assessment will most likely be tomorrow, to enable the possibility of retakes next week.

English 11: For either of the two poems we've been working with, answer the following four questions on a sheet of paper...
1. What is the structure of the poem? Describe it.
2. What does the structure "mean"? (Hint: where does this poem form come from? what does it tell you about the poet and the audience? how does it tell you about the ideas it expresses, and what does it say about those ideas?)
3. What is the poem's meaning?
4. Compare 2 and 3: do these meanings align, or conflict? How so?

Due Pi Day (3.14)
HEX: Read and annotate 1.1-2 (that's "Act I, Scenes 1 and 2" of Othello)

AP: Read and annotate the packet of readings for Monday's synthesis essay (rough draft of Gatsby final project tentatively due Wednesday)

English 11: no new HW

Due Friday, March 11
AP: Complete the 5-->5 multiple choice packet you received in class today in one sitting of 50-60 minutes; check your answers, and reflect briefly in writing on items you answered incorrectly

Due Thursday, March 10__
HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #15

English 11 Epsilon: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #15; re-read poems

English 11 Eta: complete the table we constructed at the end of class today, somewhere in your poem packet:

McKay
Hughes
Form
What is the structure of this poem?
What is the structure of this poem?
Content
What does the speaker have to say?
What does the speaker have to say?
Due Wednesday, March 9
AP: Go to this link, and play the Gatsby video game you find there at least 5 times (hopefully it is functioning): http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2013/05/the_great_gatsby_the_video_game_can_you_attain_the_american_dream.html (use the "m" and "n" keys to row). Then, in a thoughtful paragraph, explain how the game conveys the same message -- makes the same argument! -- as Nick's valediction (p. 179-180); please also answer this question: how many times did you play again after figuring out what was going on? how come? (10 HW points). Here's another Gatsby video game -- more fun to play, but less apropos of (pertinent to) our conversation: http://greatgatsbygame.com.

English 11 Epsilon: Read and annotate the poems we read aloud in class today -- pay attention to both the meaning and the structure of the poem (rhyme scheme, meter, etc.)

English 11 Eta: complete the table we constructed at the end of class today, somewhere in your poem packet:

McKay
Hughes
Content
What is the structure of this poem?
What is the structure of this poem?
Content
What does the speaker have to say?
What does the speaker have to say?


Due Tuesday, March 8
English 11 Eta: read and annotate the Langston Hughes poem you received today

English 11 Epsilon: no new homework, for those who performed their POL poems

HEX: no new HW

Due Monday, March 7
AP: Read and annotate Ch. 9 of Gatsby; check your email for questions to consider -- please respond to these in notes on a separate sheet of paper to hand in on Monday (10 HW points)

English 11 Epsilon: prepare your Poetry Out Loud poem for performance, if you haven't performed in class yet

English 11 Eta: congratulations on your Poetry Out Loud performances; no new HW

HEX: read and annotate the 2 Shakespeare sonnets you received at the end of class (ID words you don't know, use your annotations to try to figure out the meaning of each line, use your annotations to try to figure out the main idea); read and annotate the prompt also -- what, in your own words, is it asking you to do?

Due Friday, March 4
HEX: prepare your Poetry Out Loud poem for performance, finish Sentence Diagramming Exercise 14a

English 11 (both classes): prepare your Poetry Out Loud poem for performance, if you haven't performed in class yet

Due Monday, February 29 (Leap day!)
English 11 Eta and Epsilon: memorize (30 HW points) and practice your poem -- with gestures, standing up -- graded performance next week. Finish SDE 14a.

HEX: Add gestures to your line-by-line sheet; memorize your poem (30 HW points)

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 8 of Gatsby. I know I didn't mention this in class, but please consider and take notes in response to these questions (reading notes) while you read:
1. Why was Gatsby attracted to Daisy in the first place? (see pp. 148-153)
2. Why did Daisy move on from Gatsby? (see p. 151)
3. Nick tells Gatsby, "They're a rotten crowd... You're worth the whole damn bunch put together." This seems odd, given that Nick immediately after tells us that he "disapproved of [Gatsby] from beginning to end." Why does Nick tell him this, and -- assuming he is telling the truth -- why does he feel this way about Gatsby? (see not only this chapter but pretty much any time Nick discusses his feelings about Gatsby)

Due Friday, Feb 26
AP: Write a 1-paragraph summary of today's conversation (20 HW points). Write a second paragraph pursuing or exploring further an issue from this discussion on your own that you found interesting or intriguing (up to 20 HW points).

English 11 Epsilon: memorize your poem (spend at least 20 minutes Wednesday night and 20 minutes Thursday night working on it). Practice on your feet, with gestures; vary your emotion words; add emoji to the line-by-line sheet if they help you. (30 HW points)

Due Thursday, Feb 25
AP: Read and annotate Ch. 7 of Gatsby. See your email for discussion preparation instructions.

HEX: See English 11 for Wednesday, and also complete SDE 14 HW (any 2 sentences)

English 11 Eta: Finish SDE 14a; also memorize your Poetry Out loud poem -- 30 HW points (by Monday at the very latest, please, but by THURSDAY would be AWESOME -- especially for students interested in performing at the school-wide competition). Some advice: practice your poem standing up and using your gestures, make sure the words you have in the “emotions” column are varied, draw in little pictures or emoji on the line-by-line sheet to help you remember.


Due Wednesday, Feb 24
English 11 (both classes) and HEX: fill out the "emotion/desire" column of your line-by-line sheet -- for each line, what is the speaker wanting or feeling? If you need lists of "feelings," here you go: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrasting_and_categorization_of_emotions. Begin work to memorize the poem: "read and recite" individual lines, and then pairs of lines.

AP: Bring signed photo release form!!!

Due Tuesday, Feb 23
HEX and English 11 (both classes): Select either of the two poems you printed out for today. Write it out on your line-by-line sheet (1 line per line). Underline words that need emphasis; make slashes where you think there should be dramatic pauses

English 11 Eta additions: Complete SDE #14; work towards memorization of "a song in the front yard"

Due Monday, Feb 22
AP: Review Ch. 6 of Gatsby (read and annotate Ch. 7 for Thursday); return completed student photo release form for Constellations. Elias and Sylvie, please complete your practice rhetorical analysis essays.

English 11 Eta: SDE 14; continue working to memorize "a song in the front yard"

English 11 Epsilon AND Eta: Select two poems, choosing from the writings of the following poets on the Poetry Out Loud website (www.poetryoutloud.org): Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Phyllis Wheatley, Robert Hayden, Claude McKay, Melvin B. Tolson, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jean Toomer, Maya Angelou, Rita Dove, Arna Bontemps, Gwendolyn Brooks, Toi Derricotte, Tracy K. Smith, Alice Moore Dunbar-Nelson, Audre Lorde, Lucille Clifton. PRINT EACH POEM OUT AND BRING IT TO CLASS ON MONDAY (10 HW POINTS PER POEM). DC Public Libraries have inexpensive printing capacities, if you do not have access to a printer at home and want to print before you come to school on Monday. We will have a workshop with someone from DC Poetry Out Loud on Monday; it is vital that you bring your two poems (you will eventually recite one for a grade in class.)

HEX: Select two poems, choosing from the writings of the following poets on the Poetry Out Loud website (www.poetryoutloud.org): Walter Scott, John Greenleaf Whittier, Edgar Allen Poe, William Blake, Lord Byron, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, Percy Shelley (Mary Shelley's husband, FYI), William Wordsworth, Emily Dickinson, William Cullen Bryant, Ralph Waldo Emerson, James Russell Lowell, Emma Lazarus, Walt Whitman, William Shakespeare, John Donne, Thomas Wyatt, Philip Sidney, Walter Raleigh, Queen Elizabeth I, Henry VIII, Philip Marlowe. PRINT EACH POEM OUT AND BRING IT TO CLASS ON MONDAY (10 HW POINTS PER POEM). DC Public Libraries have inexpensive printing capacities, if you do not have access to a printer at home and want to print before you come to school on Monday. We will have a workshop with someone from DC Poetry Out Loud on Monday; it is vital that you bring your two poems (you will eventually recite one for a grade in class.)

Due Friday, Feb 19
English 11 Epsilon: SDE 14 HW; memorize "a song in the front yard" (10 HW points for eventual memorization; 10 HW points for memorization on Friday)

English 11 Eta: begin memorizing "a song in the front yard" -- use our "read and repeat" method for single lines and pairs of lines

HEX: memorize Shakespeare's Sonnet 130. Do more prep work than you think you need to; build up to the whole sonnet via the "read and repeat" method we practiced today (single lines, pairs of lines, groups of four lines, then six, then eight...)

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 6 of Gatsby; find and write out 10 pieces of descriptive or figurative language that you find particularly striking or interesting (include page numbers; these can be from anywhere in the book) (10 HW points)

Due Thursday, Feb 18

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 5 of Gatsby. Consider the following: What are we learning about Gatsby? What does Nick think of him? What are we learning about Nick from how he thinks about and responds to Gatsby?

Due Wednesday, Feb 17
AP: Final draft of natural rights essay -- MLA format, with in-text citations and Works Cited as necessary, with at least six underlined and labeled rhetorical devices; read and annotate Ch. 4 of Gatsby

Due Tuesday, Feb 15
English 11 Eta: SDE #13 HW (up to 10 HW points); revised, typed, edited, proofread final draft of "Theme for English B" poem (up to 20 major assignment points)

HEX: Figurative Language poster -- requirements: bigger than 8.5"x11"; term is large and clearly visible at a distance (5 pts.); definition is clearly visible at a distance (5 pts.); example from the Odyssey, preferably Book 5 (5 points); image of literal meaning of Odyssey example (5 points); explanation of Odyssey example (5 points); Shakespeare example (not from Sonnet 130 -- 5 pts.); additional non-Odyssey example (5 points) -- total value: 35 HW points

English 11 Epsilon: revised, typed, edited, proofread final draft of "Theme for English B" poem (up to 20 major assignment points)

Due Friday, Feb 12
English 11 Epsilon: SDE #13 HW

AP: review materials on writing Rhetorical Analysis essays, so you can do your best on tomorrow's

Due Thursday, Feb 11
HEX: SDE 13 HW (any 2 sentences)

AP: work on essay, review Gatsby discussion notes

English 11: Memorize Frost's "Stopping by Woods..." if you haven't already; bring a TYPED, PAPER draft of your "Theme for English B" poem to class tomorrow (10 HW points). As you move from handwritten copy to typed copy, revise to include more information about yourself, and more VIVID, SPECIFIC images.

Due Wednesday, Feb 10
AP: typed, paper copy of the second draft of your essay on the existence of natural rights (20 HW points)

English 11 (both classes): Memorize Frost's "Stopping by Woods..." if you haven't already; bring a TYPED, PAPER draft of your "Theme for English B" poem to class tomorrow. As you move from handwritten copy to typed copy, revise to include more information about yourself, and more VIVID, SPECIFIC images.

Due Tuesday, Feb 9
HEX: no new HW (note: any time there is no HW assigned it is a good idea to review vocabulary)

English 11 (both classes): bring rough draft of your "Theme for English B" poem, come to class with "Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening" memorized (review it several times tonight)

Due Monday, Feb 8
HEX: no new HW

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 3 of Gatsby. In your reading notes, prepare for Monday's seminar by composing three questions for discussion. Accompany these questions with notes (what you think, or why you think the question is important) and page numbers or textual references. If you write more than a single-spaced page, you have done too much.

English 11 Eta: SDE #12 HW

English 11 Epsilon: no new HW

Due Friday, Feb 5
English 11 Epsilon: Socratic discussion reflection, Sentence Diagramming Exercise #12 HW, memorize "Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening" for 20 XC HW points, bring Harlem Renaissance documentary questions sheet to hand in, bring draft of "Theme for English B" poem and materials

English 11 Eta: bring draft of "Theme for English B" poem and materials

AP: Rough draft of natural rights essay (30 HW points)

HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #12 HW, read and annotate Books 6-8 of the Odyssey

Due Thursday, February 4
HEX: Read and annotate Books 6-8 of the Odyssey

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 2 of Gatsby, bring multiple choice packet to hand in (if you haven't already done so)

Due Wednesday, February 3
AP: AP exam multiple choice packet (with answers checked and brief reflections on items answered incorrectly); read and annotate Ch. 1 of Gatsby

Due Tuesday, February 2
English 11 (both classes): Discussion reflection (40 HW points)

Due Monday, February 1
AP: Rough draft of essay on natural rights (30 HW points)

HEX: no new HW

English 11 (both classes): discussion reflection will be collected on Tuesday, but better to do it over the weekend while your memory is fresh

Due Friday, January 29
English 11: complete at least one of the four parts of the discussion reflection; come to class tomorrow having reviewed Huck to continue our conversation, and ready to submit your book and Q2 warm-ups at the end of class

HEX: Read and annotate Book 5 of the Odyssey, if you have not already. Remember to submit your book for an annotations check tomorrow, if you have not already.

English 11 Huck Finn Resources:
audio-book by chapter (male reader) -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UqSEg2e-vL8&list=PL678C730D30AF0816
audio-book by chapter (female reader) -- https://librivox.org/the-adventures-of-huckleberry-finn-by-mark-twain/
we <3 librivox

Due Thursday, January 28:
ALL CLASSES: COME TO CLASS TOMORROW PREPARED TO SUBMIT YOUR Q2 WARM-UPS, AS WELL AS -- FOR HEX AND ENG 11 -- YOUR BOOKS ( HUCK AND THE ODYSSEY) FOR AN ANNOTATIONS CHECK

YOU MAY RETAKE THE SENTENCE DIAGRAMMING ASSESSMENT ON THURSDAY 1/28 OR FRIDAY 1/29!

English 11 (both classes): Socratic discussion prep

AP: Finish your Selma reflection, research and plan your essay on natural rights (do use X, King, and Thoreau)

HEX: In addition to other things, please read Book 5 (world will not end if you don't before our next class, but please do)

Due Thursday, January 21
HEX: Read and annotate Books 3 and 4 of the Odyssey; be ready to leave your book and notebook behind

AP: finish Selma reflection, if you have not already

Due Wednesday, January 20
AP: "Civil Disobedience" question packet likely due; have watched Selma by today; finish Selma reflection ( ); here are the supplemental texts referred to for #4 (Jamelle Bouie is the author of the Slate piece -- read that one second; the Salon piece outlines the historical inaccuracies in Selma -- read that one first): http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2015/01/selma_and_lbj_why_critics_are_wrong_about_how_the_film_portrays_president.html; . No, we haven't talked about this in class yet, as question 4 implies -- sorry.

Due Tuesday, January 19
English 11 Eta: Read and annotate Ch. 38-41 of Huck; complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #11 (10 HW points)

English 11 Epsilon: Read and annotate Ch. 38-41 of Huck

HEX: final draft of essay on The Mission (30 HW points)

Due Friday, January 15
AP: Officially, the homework is to finish reading and annotating "Civil Disobedience"; practically speaking, we will likely not discuss every question in the packet on Friday.

HEX: revised, typed, double-spaced second draft of essay on The Mission due on paper today (10 HW points).

English 11 Epsilon: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #11 (10 HW points). Hint: in #2, treat "every year" as an adverb answering the question "When?"

English 11 Eta: Read and annotate Ch. 38-41 of Huck

Due Thursday, January 14
HEX: complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #11; read and annotate Books 1 and 2 of the Odyssey

AP: continue reading, annotating, and responding to reading questions for "Civil Disobedience." No, we probably won't talk about all of the questions tomorrow -- especially with another argumentative essay coming up -- but it will save you homework tomorrow night and over the weekend. Please help me remember to talk about when to have finished watching Selma by in class tomorrow

Due Wednesday, January 13

AP: Continue reading, annotating, and responding to reading questions on "Civil Disobedience." Will we go over all of them in class on Wednesday? No. Will we get through more than the first 6.5 pages' worth of questions? Perhaps.

English 11 Epsilon: read and annotate Ch. 35-37 of Huck. Tomorrow's homework will be a sentence diagramming exercise. What do you think I will ask you to leave behind for me to check on, which you will not be able to "revise" for full credit later?

English 11 Eta: read and annotate Ch. 35-37 of Huck.

Due Tuesday, January 12
HEX: bring a revised paper draft of your essay on The Mission to tomorrow's class for a peer conference (if you do not revise based on feedback you've received from me before tomorrow, your peer conference will likely not produce any new feedback) (10 HW points). Students will receive credit for the homework and be marked on time for class if they enter the room on time with paper copies of their essays or make prior arrangements with Mr. Day.

English 11 (both classes): Read and annotate pp. 33-35 of Huck Finn

Due Monday, January 11

AP: Read and annotate the first 6.5 pages of "Civil Disobedience"; answer in writing the appropriate questions in the reading question packet. Plan to watch Selma outside of class before the end of next week (as Allegra mentioned, there's this thing called a "library" that now has "dvd's" that you can check out... see Mr. Day if you don't have a dvd player at home and have trouble accessing the film online). FYI, in case you watch the film over the weekend, here is some version of the writing you'll eventually be asked to do:

HEX: Rough draft of essay on The Mission due Monday

English 11 (both classes): read and annotate Ch. 30-32 of Huck

Due Friday, January 8
English 11 (both classes): Read and annotate Ch. 27-29 of Huck

AP:
1. Review the rest of King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" (p. 5 onwards, roughly) and relevant reading questions. What else should we talk about?
2. Revise and type into a Googledoc (shared with Mr. Day) your precis assignment (we're going to make them awesome)
3. Figure out if you have inexpensive access to the film Selma outside of class (group viewing is fine)

HEX: Bring thesis statement and supporting main ideas for your essay on The Mission to class tomorrow (10 HW points)

Due Thursday, January 7
English 11 Eta: Complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise 10a

HEX: Complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise 10a

AP: Read (and annotate, of course) the chapter from Five Steps to a Five on argumentative essays (we will write one in the first part of class tomorrow); revise and type up your precis in a Google doc that you share with Mr. Day (comments and revisions to follow until all are awesome)

English 11 Epsilon:

Due Wednesday, January 6
AP:
1. Peruse the argumentative essay packet; come with comments and questions on Wednesday
2. Complete #11, 12, and 13 from the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" reading question packet in the Warm-up section of your binder (this will count as Warm-up #13)
3. Come to class prepared to use all your rhetorical skills to justify your choice of favorite "Emo Kylo Ren" tweets: https://twitter.com/kylor3n?lang=en

English 11 Epsilon: Complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise 10a

Due Tuesday, January 5
English 11 (both classes): Update your annotations (Ch. 24-26); finish quotations and images from today (up to 20 class work points)

HEX: Remember to bring your IR book (Frankenstein?) tomorrow! Respond in writing to one of the five prompts below:
1. Throughout the history of Christianity, the notion of living in imitatio Christi — “in the imitation of Christ,” living and acting as Jesus did — has been tremendously important as an ethical imperative (it shows up in 3 of the 4 Gospels, in the letters of Paul, in the writings of Augustine and Francis of Assisi…). In terms of “imitatio Christi,” how can you explain the significance of each wearing the cross necklace of the original Jesuit missionary? In what ways do Gabriel and Rodrigo each “take up the cross” in their choices in this film?

2. Perhaps the most significant historical inaccuracy of the film is that the Jesuits actually left the missions when ordered by their superiors in the Church, and didn’t actually fight in the battles between the Guarani and the Spanish and Portuguese — let alone lead the defenses of the missions against the Europeans. Does knowing that this aspect of the film is inaccurate change your thinking about the film? Does the historical accuracy of the film matter for the meaning of the story? For both of these questions: If so, how? If not, why not?

3. Immediately before the end credits, the following words scroll across the screen (we actually did see this, but it was tough to notice): “The Indians of South America are still engaged in a struggle to defend their land and their culture. Many of the priests who, inspired by faith and love, continue to support the rights of the Indians for justice, do so with their lives. ‘The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.’ [The Gospel of] JOHN. Chapter 1, Verse 5.” How does this text, and especially the Biblical quotation, shape or alter the story and its meaning?

4. What do you think is the meaning of Altamirano’s direct look at the audience at the end of the credits? How come you think so? How does his look affect the viewer and the meaning of the story?

5. In class today, Ayinde stated, “the film makes it seem like the Guarani weren’t civilized until white people came.” This comment can point our thinking in a number of directions. Respond to the following questions to help you think about the portrayal of indigenous people in the film:
  1. If Ayinde’s comment is accurate, how would your impression of the film be changed? (Why does this question matter?)
  2. What does it mean for a group of people to be “civilized”? How come you think so?
  3. Do you think Ayinde’s comment is accurate? How come? (Remember: you are thinking about the film here as a whole, and not 1-2 particular characters.)

English 11 students: here's a link to the "Minstrel Show" number from White Christmas: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrEfB35a5vU. Some things to notice:
1. The film is from 1954; minstrel shows were no longer popular this late in US history, but note that the song expresses nostalgia for them
2. The characters are not in blackface (see #1), but the gloves, hats, and baggy suits are typical
3. The bad jokes -- or at least, these bad jokes -- are not race-dependent, nor is their humor (or lack of humor)
4. The characters putting on the show are unashamed of calling this "the minstrel show number"

Due Friday, December 18
AP: Identify and label 15 rhetorical devices in "Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus" (15 HW points). Do not lose your argumentative essay packet.

HEX: Respond to any three of the quotations you received in class today (1 short paragraph for each) (10 HW points).
English 11 (both classes): Read and annotate Ch. 24-26 of Huck; the probability of you being asked to leave your books behind after class for an annotations check approaches 1.

Due Thursday, December 17
English 11 (Eta): catch up on your annotations; re-read pp. 108-110 of Huck

Due Wednesday, December 16
AP: Read and annotate King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail," using the reading questions packet to guide your thinking; in one 45-50 minute setting, complete 5-->5 #271-310 (Paine, Hobbes (?), Wollstonecraft, and Machiavelli); check your answers, and write brief reflections on your thought process for any item you answered incorrectly (40 HW points)

HEX: No new HW (but it would be a really good idea to continue your vocabulary review -- sorry I forgot to mention that in class)

English 11 (Epsilon): catch up on your annotations; re-read pp. 108-110 of Huck

Due Tuesday, December 15
HEX: Continue to review vocabulary (you will need to know parts of speech, definitions, 1 synonym, 1 antonym, 1 cognate, all roots and meanings and the language of origin, and a phonetic spelling on the test); complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #10 (provided in class on Monday in Mr. Day's absence)

English 11 (both classes): Read and annotate through Ch. 23 of Huck; we will update annotations sheets on Tuesday

English 11 Eta: Complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #10

Due Thursday, December 10
English 11 (both sections): read and annotate (3 notes per page) Ch. 17-20 of Huck

English 11 Epsilon: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #10

English 11 Eta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #9

AP: Read and annotate pp. 1-4, plus the first two paragraphs of p. 5, of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail." Use the reading questions as a guide for your thinking; you do not need to write out answers to the questions.

HEX: study your vocabulary for 20 minutes.

Due Wednesday, December 9
HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #9

English 11 Eta: re-read pp. 74-75, 78-end of Ch. 15 of Huck

AP: Watch Obama's Oval Office speech on the San Bernardino shootings -- http://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2015/12/07/president-obama-oval-office-terror-speech-full.cnn/video/playlists/president-of-the-united-states/ (here's a transcript if you want to read it -- (https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/12/06/address-nation-president). Do so thoughtfully, as a student of rhetoric.

Due Tuesday, December 8
English 11 Epsilon: re-read pp. 74-75, 78-end of Ch. 15 of Huck

Due Monday, December 7
AP: re-read closely the John Stuart Mill selection from the multiple choice assignment

Eta: read and annotate pp. 65-88 (the end of Ch. 16) of Huck; (Sentence Diagramming Exercise 9 due Thursday)

Epsilon: read and annotate Ch. 12-16 of Huck

HEX: Reflect on the past two days' discussion --
1. Compose one paragraph summary of the discussion, using your notes
2. In a second paragraph, pick 1 idea or comment you found intriguing, and explain and explore it further (be thorough, thoughtful, and accurate -- this will be graded); if you are struggling to think of something, go with this: Is Gilgamesh consoled or better able to accept death, loss, and his lack of control at the end of the story? How so? Why?

Due Thursday, December 3
AP: review the last pages of our packet on "The Ballot or the Bullet" (additional text from other version of the speech)

Eta: no homework (enjoy it!)

HEX: review Gilgamesh annotations and key moments

Epsilon: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #9
Due Wednesday, December 2
English 11 Eta: read and annotate Huck, Ch. 8-11 (3 annotations per page); finish annotations log for Ch. 1-7 (only the pages you read on your own)

Due Tuesday, December 1
AP: see below

HEX: read and annotate Gilgamesh packet (3 notes per page), complete annotations log/tally sheet

English 11 Epsilon: read and annotate Huck, Ch. 8-11 (3 annotations per page); finish annotations log for Ch. 1-7 (only the pages you read on your own)

Due Monday, November 30
AP:
1. Have "The Ballot or the Bullet" read twice (once while listening along -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRNciryImqg once while annotating)
2. Complete an appropriately challenging SOW diagram on a clean, blank (unlined) sheet of paper -- make it clean and beautiful (30 HW points)
3. Typed, revised, double-spaced, edited and proofread, MLA format "final" draft of essay on the funeral orations in Julius Caesar, with in-text citations and Works Cited entry

HEX: revised, typed, edited and proofread MLA format "final" draft of Hebrew Bible essay, on paper (MLA format includes double-spacing, in-text citations, and Work Cited entry)

English 11, both classes: typed, double-spaced, revised, edited and proofread, MLA format "final" draft of short slavery essay due Monday, on paper, with in-text citations and Works Cited entries

Due Friday, November 20
English 11 Epsilon and Eta: PAPER COPY of typed second draft of slavery essay; prepare for grammar and diagramming assessment

HEX: prepare for grammar and diagramming assessment ("final" draft of essay due Monday)

Due Thursday, November 19
AP: Rough draft of rhetorical analysis essay on the funeral orations in Julius Caesar ("final" draft due Monday)

English 11 Epsilon and Eta: PAPER COPY of typed second draft of slavery essay due FRIDAY; grammar and diagramming assessment FRIDAY

HEX: Typed PAPER COPY of second draft of Hebrew Bible essay due Thursday (30 HW points) -- revised, MLA format, with in-text citations and Work Cited entry; grammar and diagramming assessment FRIDAY

Due Wednesday, November 18
AP: Come to class mentally, emotionally, and physically ready to undertake a rhetorical analysis essay on a prompt you haven't seen before

English 11 Epsilon and Eta: PAPER COPY of typed second draft of slavery essay due FRIDAY; grammar and diagramming assessment FRIDAY

Due Tuesday, November 17
English 11 (both classes): rough draft of one-or-three paragraph essay on men's and women's experiences of slavery (20 HW points); Eta period -- construct a Works Cited entry for 12 Years a Slave: go to https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/ and follow the link on the left-hand side to "Other Common Sources," and follow the directions for "Recorded Films and Movies" (the director's name is Steve McQueen, you can leave out the performers, the distributor is Fox, the copyright year is 2013, and the medium is Amazon Video -- remember that the film name starts with "12," and not "Twelve" -- this will have ramifications for your Works Cited page).

HEX: Finish your essay rough draft, if you haven't already; if you would like to compose your own peer questions for tomorrow's peer conference, email your ideas to Mr. Day tonight; grammar and diagramming assessment in class on Friday; bring IR book tomorrow

Due Monday, November 16
English 11 (both classes): Sentence Diagramming Exercise #7a (20 HW points); bring Douglass and Jacobs excerpts on Monday

HEX: Rough draft of all three sections of the writing assignment on the Hebrew Bible

AP: Make notes on the prompt sheet in preparation for drafting a rhetorical analysis essay on the funeral speeches in Julius Caesar.

Due Friday, November 13
AP: Please submit together:
Discussion reflection -- summary of conversation, plus thorough and thoughtful exploration of a particular issue or question
Discussion notes per se -- from Thursday's discussion
Discussion prep notes -- either some jottings based on the Googledoc submissions, or a copy of the Googledoc that you've annotated

Please also bring: the multiple choice packet from last weekend (30 HW points)

English 11 Epsilon: In the warm-up section of your notebook, compose three numbered sentences to reflect on 12 Years a Slave: what surprised you, shocked you, disappointed you -- or didn't -- about the story or the way it was filmed?

HEX: SDE #7a

English 11 Eta: Friday will be a drafting day


Due Thursday, November 12
English 11 Eta: update your Venn diagram; we start drafting our essays on Thursday

HEX: complete SDE 7a (that's the one you received today) -- CORRECTION -- MR. DAY WILL NOT BE IN CLASS ON THURSDAY AND THIS WILL BE COLLECTED ON FRIDAY

AP: Finish discussion preparation (ideally, you have an annotated printout of everyone's prep work, but this may not be possible; some print copies of the work that was completed before class today are still in our room) -- at the very least, read over folks' contributions and make some notes on a separate sheet of paper about what you're interested in talking about. Following Thursday's discussion, please be prepared to submit some preparatory notes (in addition to the Googledoc, if you don't have an annotated paper copy of it), your notes from during the discussion, and a discussion reflection (summary of conversation plus thorough and thoughtful explanation of a particular issue or question)

Due Wednesday, November 11
AP: See Googledoc for directions for preparing for Thursday's Socratic discussion. Please complete the individual work by Wednesday so that you can review what your classmates have written Wednesday night in preparation for Thursday's conversation (mea culpa to Ethan and anyone else who burned the midnight oil (you know what that means, right?) to get it done Monday night, which is what the message that came with the Googledoc says)

English 11 Epsilon: update your Venn diagram; we start drafting our essays tomorrow

Due Tuesday, November 10
English 11 (both classes): update your Venn diagram

HEX: research dates for your two timeline facts; bring your IR book on Tuesday; do not lose your essay prompt

Due Monday, November 9
English 11 (both classes): Sentence Diagramming Exercise #7 (20 HW points); update your Venn diagram

AP: bring your graded and scored Louv Rhetorical Analysis essay; complete the practice multiple choice packet -- see if you can finish it in 60 minutes or less (90 minutes for people with extended exam time); once done, check your answers and reflect briefly in writing in the margins of the packet on your thought process for items you answered incorrectly -- ALSO, not mentioned in class: please re-read the funeral speeches in Julius Caesar, and bring your copy of WLLP to class on Monday

HEX: Read and annotate Ex 32-32, skim 40

Due Friday, November 6
English 11: update your Venn diagram

HEX: Review synonyms, antonyms, and definitions in your vocabulary notes; have Ex 13-24 read for tomorrow

AP: finish Cornell notes for the "Logos" chapter of Everything's An Argument; bring WLLP, EAA, and your selection from Julius Caesar tomorrow

Due Thursday, November 5
HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #7; read and annotate Ex 13-20, skim 21-24

English 11 Eta: Reflect on the portion of 12 Years a Slave that we viewed today; update your Venn diagram with any new details you can recall about the ways that women and men experienced slavery similarly, and differently.

AP: review (in your mind, in your Latin notes, or on wikipedia) the fall of the Roman republic (from the First Triumvirate through the crowning of Augustus as emperor); review the section on the funeral speeches in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar in WLLP; read and annotate Act 3, Scene 2 of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.

Due Wednesday, November 4
AP: Listen to the piece on polling in the Republican primary from last week's episode of On the Media (http://www.onthemedia.org/story/media-pull-versus-push/). In the Warm-up section of your notes, list 6 ways in which poll data can be less straightforward than it seems (6 class work points).

English 11 Epsilon: Reflect on the portion of 12 Years a Slave that we viewed today; update your Venn diagram with any new details you can recall about the ways that women and men experienced slavery similarly, and differently.

Due Tuesday, November 3
English 11 (both classes): begin note-taking on your Venn diagram on the ways that women's and men's experiences under slavery were both similar and different (this will not be scored, but it will help you later on when we start writing, because a good chunk of your research -- the Douglass and Jacobs parts -- will already be done)

HEX: bring your IR book! Also, see previous assignment (under Monday, November 2)

Due Monday, November 2
AP: Prep for Monday's rhetorical analysis essay. Work the prompt, read the text, mark up the text a la Mortimer Adler, annotate the text. Do not outline, other than to think about and maybe jot down your thesis, main ideas, and what pieces of text to use. Do not write on the reverse of the prompt sheet.

HEX: Below is a list of things we've found striking about Exodus 1-12. In the warm-up section of your notebook, draw connections between any three of them and something we encountered or discussed in our reading of Genesis:
Ex 2: Moses' complicated identity -- why would he side with the Israelites and not the Egyptians?
Ex 4: Moses -- I am slow of speech... (God's relationship with Moses is similar to and different from his relationships with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob)
Ex 4 (?): God places trust in Moses, gives him power to use (foreshadowing?)
Ex 4: Moses worried that the Israelites won't listen
Ex 4: God tries to kill Moses (!?)
Ex 7: (8-13) Moses and Aaron versus the magicians (evidence of people worshipping other gods)
Ex 11: (4) the death of the firstborn of Egypt -- Why do this to the whole Egyptian nation? Why does God not just free the Israelites at the outset?

English 11 Epsilon and Eta: complete SDE 6 (remember to underline prepositional phrases -- some of these sentences are deliberately tricky!) (20 HW points). Epsilon only: All revisions of Puritan ethos paragraphs are due Monday (be sure to include original final drafts, rubrics, and a note about what revisions you've made, if you want the revision grade for credit).

Due Friday, October 30
English 11 Epsilon:
A. BRING YOUR Q1 WARM-UPS TO HAND IN FOR CREDIT
B. finish reading the excerpt from Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
C. complete the sentence diagramming table handout if you have not already
D. if you are opting out/being opted out of viewing 12 Years a Slave, bring your completed opt out form to class
E. Respond to the following questions in the warm-up section of your notebook:
1. write out three short quotations FROM CH. 10 in which she uses euphemisms, and explain what she actually means for each
2. based on her use of euphemisms, the fact that she feels guilty rather than triumphant after becoming pregnant with Mr. Sands' child, and the fact that she begs forgiveness from the reader for her choices and actions, what can we infer about her sense of sexual morality (what she thinks of as right and wrong, where sex is concerned)? How can you tell?
3. Jacobs suggests that such a sense of morality cannot be sustained (lived up to) by a person who is held in slavery.
a. Write out a quote that reflects this
b. Explain why she thinks this is true (that being a slave and maintaining her sense of sexual morality are incompatible).

English 11 Eta: BRING YOUR Q1 WARM-UPS TO HAND IN FOR CREDIT

HEX: BRING YOUR Q1 WARM-UPS TO HAND IN FOR CREDIT; also, study your vocabulary for 20 minutes -- synonyms, antonyms, and definitions

AP: SUBMIT YOUR Q1 WARM-UPS TO MR. DAY SOME TIME TOMORROW, IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY

Due Thursday, October 29
English 11 Eta:
A. finish reading the excerpt from Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
B. complete the sentence diagramming table handout if you have not already
C. if you are opting out/being opted out of viewing 12 Years a Slave, bring your completed opt out form to class
D. Respond to the following questions in the warm-up section of your notebook:
1. write out three short quotations FROM CH. 10 in which she uses euphemisms, and explain what she actually means for each
2. based on her use of euphemisms, the fact that she feels guilty rather than triumphant after becoming pregnant with Mr. Sands' child, and the fact that she begs forgiveness from the reader for her choices and actions, what can we infer about her sense of sexual morality (what she thinks of as right and wrong, where sex is concerned)? How can you tell?
3. Jacobs suggests that such a sense of morality cannot be sustained (lived up to) by a person who is held in slavery.
a. Write out a quote that reflects this
b. Explain why she thinks this is true (that being a slave and maintaining her sense of sexual morality are incompatible).

HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #6 (both sides)

AP: Watch enough of the Republican debate tonight that you are able to identify and record, on paper, 3 appeals to logos, 3 appeals to pathos, and 3 appeals to ethos (please include the speaker as well as a quotation) (10 HW points).

Due Wednesday, October 28
AP:
--Bring your copy of the "Logos" chapter of EAA;
--study your test vocabulary for 20 minutes;
--do, in writing, #1 and #2 on p. 93-4 of EAA (for #2, write out the full train of thought implicit in the enthymeme -- see p. 86 for an example using the argument "We'd better cancel the picnic because it's going to rain" -- Ethan, note that this is very definitely an argument because it is advocating for a particular course of action (10 HW points)
--help me remember to make sure everyone turns in their Lincoln HW and Pathos "Quiz" on Wednesday

Due Tuesday, October 27
HEX: study the synonyms, antonyms, and definitions of our vocabulary words (5 min. of vocab tomorrow); bring your IR book to class

English 11 Epsilon and Eta: complete the grammar table handout you received today, including the sentence diagrams. Note that "out of" -- in #3, I believe -- acts as a single preposition (think of it as one word).

Due Monday, October 26
HEX: Read and annotate Exodus 1-12. Complete Monday's Warm-up in advance: What are three moments, quotations, or events in these chapters that you find worthy of investigation or discussion? What is interesting about each with regard to the nature of God, the Israelites, Moses, or any of their relationships with each other?

English 11 Epsilon and Eta: Be sure you know who the following 4 people in Harriet Jacobs' narrative are: Linda Brent, Dr. Flint, Mr. Sands, Aunt Martha. ALSO, PLEASE COMPLETE THE HW SIDE OF SENTENCE DIAGRAMMING EXERCISE 5 FOR MONDAY!

AP: read and annotate the Mortimer Adler reading about reading and annotating; read and annotate the Everything's An Argument chapter on "Logos."

Due Friday, October 23
HEX: Complete reading questions for Genesis 32-35

AP: skim, with writing tool in hand, the "Logos" chapter of Everything's An Argument

English 11 Eta: know the following four people in Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Linda Brent, Dr. Flint, Mr. Sands, Aunt Martha

Due Thursday, October 22
HEX: Read and annotate Genesis 32-35; complete both sides of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #5

AP: Complete the pathos "quiz." Here are the two missing questions:
--3. People are less likely to be driven by a logic-driven argument when the thesis of that argument contradicts or is different from what they already think. Explain how an appeal to pathos can help in such a situation.
--4. Describe some of the risks inherent in using pathos -- what are one or more of the ways an appeal to pathos might fail, and what might be the consequences?
English 11 Epsilon: Carefully read the wikipedia "plot summary" of Harriet Jacobs' Incidents. There are a lot of names -- you may want to read it twice.

Due Wednesday, October 21
AP: complete Lincoln viewing questions (#1-13 = 26 HW points, 1A, 1B, 2, 3 = 10 HW points); construct outline of Ch. 4 of Everything's An Argument; complete any two tasks from the items at the end of the chapter (you may write less than 300 words for the one that asks for 300 words).

English 11: Please make sure you have answered the two sets of questions below (under Tuesday, October 20 -- #1-3, letters A and B) in the warm-up section of your notebook.

Due Tuesday, October 20
HEX: Review the relevant text for the questions we decided to focus our conversations on from Genesis 27-28 (questions 10-18; Genesis 27:1-45)

English 11: review/re-read Ch. 10 of Frederick Douglass' Narrative (audio reading:
http://ia801406.us.archive.org/0/items/frederick-douglass_jf_librivox/narrative_10_douglass_64kb.mp3)
Questions to Answer in the Warm-up section of your notebook:

"I now resolved that, however long I might be a slave in form, the day had passed forever when I would be a slave in fact."
1. What does Douglass mean by this?
2. Suggest what experience might have brought Douglass to this decision. Why do you think so?
3. Having made this decision, how do you think he would have thought, felt, or acted differently? Why do you think so?

A. What enabled Douglass to successfully resist Covey? --Think about 1. psychological and emotional factors, 2. Douglass' life history, and 3. his physical characteristics. How might each of these (1, 2, and 3) have served as an advantage to him? B. Why didn't Covey continue to beat Douglass, or even simply kill him? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

Due Wednesday, October 14
HEX: Complete SDE #4 HW side, if you have not already; carefully review Gen 12:1-3, Gen 13 (YOU CAN SKIP 14!), Gen 16-22

Due Tuesday, October 13
HEX: typed, revised, edited, double-spaced, proofread, MLA formatted 3rd draft of Life of Pi essay due on paper, with a rubric stapled to it, at the very start of class (attach previous drafts beneath the third if you so desire) (30 major assignment points)

English 11 Eta: HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #4 (10 HW points)

English 11 Epsilon and Eta:
1. research 5 biographical facts about Frederick Douglass (please do more interesting things than just birth and death dates) -- write them on a piece of paper (5 HW points -- sorry Epsilon, it's going to be 5, not 10)
2. copy vocab words from SOW conversations and Reading notes into Vocabulary section of your notebook -- meanings, roots and other notes on particular words and concepts (here's the list: antithesis, parallel structure, anaphora, juxtaposition, paranoia, colloquial, eloquent, loquacious, polysyndeton, asyndeton, synchronization, symmetry)

AP: Read and annotate the selections you received from Everything's An Argument. On paper, complete #1, 4, or 6 on p. 36-37, and #1 on p. 51 (2 items total -- 10 HW points total)

Due Friday, October 9
English 11 Epsilon: HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #4 (10 HW points)

English 11 Epsilon and Eta: 1-paragraph writing assignment on the Puritan ethos (acceptable materials to use: class notes, brain, writing tool, paper, "Sinners," "YGB," paragraph on why Puritans would think appearances can be deceiving, prompt sheet; unacceptable materials to use: things other than those listed as acceptable). PS: The "Puritans Ethos Paragraph" will be a major assignment worth up to 15 points.

AP: re-read and annotate pp. 45-71 of WLLP

HEX: read and annotate Gen 16-22

Due Thursday, October 8
HEX: revised, typed, double-spaced second draft of Life of Pi essay due at the start of class (30 HW points); read and annotate Genesis 11:1-9, 12:1-3, 13-14:9; my hope is that you will also be able to get the HW side of SDE #4 done for Thursday also (10 HW points)

English 11 Eta: review your notes, "YGB," "Sinners," and your "Why would the Puritans believe appearances can be deceiving?" paragraph as preparation for an in-class writing assignment in which you describe the Puritan ethos (Q: Why would the Puritans' concern about one's inward reality versus outer appearance never go away? A: Because you never can be sure if... because... --> we'll maybe talk about this Thursday)

AP: Make the rest of your rhetorical device posters (see prev. HW); review the G'burg Address section in WLLP; do the following in the warm-up section of your notebook: list and explain 3 rhetorical strategies Lincoln uses in the Address (include diction as one of them -- hint: don't just say "diction" -- what kind of diction is it?)

Due Wednesday, October 7
English 11 Epsilon: review your notes, "YGB," "Sinners," and your "Why would the Puritans believe appearances can be deceiving?" paragraph as preparation for an in-class writing assignment in which you describe the Puritan ethos (Q: Why would the Puritans' concern about one's inward reality versus outer appearance never go away? A: Because you never can be sure if... because... --> we'll maybe talk about this tomorrow)

AP: make posters for your assigned rhetorical devices (4 posters x 5 points each = 20 HW points) -- include the device name (big, visible, clear), the definition (also clear, less big), and two examples (you may use 1 from your handlist; the text of these can be smaller)

Due Tuesday, October 6
English 11: Answer these questions in the warm-up section of your notebook (this will count as a warm-up)...
1. If YGB's (Young Goodman Brown's) experience was a dream, then something is wrong with him at the end of the story -- what is it, and how did the dream make this happen?
2. If YGB's experience is not a dream, then something is wrong with his community -- what is it, and why does it upset YGB?
3. Either way, YGB doesn't trust anyone any more -- why not?

HEX: bring IR book tomorrow; read and annotate Genesis 6-9

Due Monday, October 5
AP: Finish Gettysburg Address multi-media assignment; re-read the Gettysburg address a couple more times, especially if you no longer have it memorized (try to internalize the rhythms)

English 11 Epsilon: read and annotate the rest of "Young Goodman Brown"

English 11 Eta: complete the HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #3

HEX: Rough draft of Life of Pi essay (30 HW points); read and annotate chapters 1-4 of Genesis

Due Friday, October 2
English 11 Epsilon and Eta: In one paragraph ("point plus sufficient support"), explain why Puritans might believe appearances to be deceiving. USE YOUR NOTES! (10 HW points).

English 11 Epsilon: Also, finish the HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #3. Feel free to come to tutorial for help with the diagramming.

AP: Re-read and annotate pp. 137-146 of Words Like Loaded Pistols. Read and annotate the Gettysburg address, and complete the Gettysburg Address Multi-media Assignment (see below if you did not pick one up in class):


Due Thursday, October 1
HEX: "Work the prompt" -- annotate your essay prompt sheet with notes to yourself about your own ideas, about the different components of the directions for each prompt (annotated prompt sheet: 10 HW points); Sentence Diagramming Exercise #3 (10 HW points)

English 11 Eta: read and annotate "Young Goodman Brown," by Nathaniel Hawthorne

AP: bring a mug to class; in one thorough, thoughtful paragraph, explain why "words matter" to Gloria Anzaldua (10 HW points)

Due Wednesday, September 30
English 11 Epsilon: bring your independent reading book to class tomorrow

AP: read and annotate "How to Tame a Wild Tongue," by Gloria Anzaldua

Due Tuesday, September 29

English 11: On a piece of white (unlined) paper, 1. write out, and 2. draw pictures of the literal meanings of 6 pieces of figurative language from Edwards' sermon that describe the spiritual condition of human beings in relation to God, according to Jonathan Edwards.

HEX: Write a paragraph summarizing today's discussion; also, explain what makes for a good discussion

Due Monday, September 28
HEX: The character Francis Adirubasamy calls Pi's story "a story that will make you believe in God." The LA Times Book Review calls this novel "a story to make you believe in the soul-sustaining power of fiction." Please respond to either or both of these quotations (10 HW points for at least 1/2 single-spaced page of text, typed or handwritten). Discussion to follow on Monday.

English 11: Read the rest of "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God," paying attention to (underlining? highlighting?) figurative language and images -- things that create striking images in your mind. Here's an audio link to listen to and read along with, if you like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI5qCFksA7Y. Note that the speaker in the audio is giving a much more deadpan or dry delivery than Mr. Day did; in part this is because preaching styles have changed in the last 270 years.

AP: Compose two body paragraphs of a hypothetical rhetorical analysis essay on the passage we're reading from In Cold Blood, addressing Truman Capote's use of imagery and contrasts to create a sense of Holcomb, KS as a bleak and dreary place (20 HW points).

Due Friday, September 25
Epsilon: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #2 -- HW side (10 HW points)

AP: read and mark up (highlight, underline, etc. important bits) pp. 67-76 of the packet you received today; re-read and annotate the passage from In Cold Blood, annotating for diction (concrete words, negative connotations), contrasts (hurray for something that's not a formal rhetorical term!), imagery, characterization (of people), literary elements (such as setting), figurative language; come to class tomorrow ready to talk about these and how Capote uses them to achieve his purpose in writing (conveying a sense of Holcomb, KS as a bleak, desolate... place)

HEX: re-read pp. 289-319 of The Life of Pi

English 11 Eta: no new HW; brace yourself for a double dose tomorrow

Due Thursday, September 24
AP: 3rd (aka "final") draft of Orwell essay (on paper, typed, revised, edited, proofread, double-spaced, MLA-formatted with Works Cited entries, stapled with rubric and prior drafts) -- up to 30 Major Assignment points, due at the start of class

English 11 Eta: 3rd (aka "final") draft of Catcher essay (on paper, typed, revised, edited, proofread, double-spaced, MLA-formatted with Works Cited entries, stapled with rubric and prior drafts) -- up to 30 Major Assignment points, due at the start of class

HEX: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #2 (HW side) -- 10 HW points for thoughtful completion

Due Wednesday, September 23

English 11 Epsilon: 3rd (aka "final") draft of Catcher essay (on paper, typed, revised, edited, proofread, double-spaced, MLA-formatted with Works Cited entries, stapled with rubric and prior drafts) -- up to 30 Major Assignment points, due at the start of class

AP: commence editing and proofreading your Orwell essay. Read closely the sample essay packet you received today, but feel free to skip the third essay and its score explanation.

Due Tuesday, September 22

HEX: review the rest of The Life of Pi (pp. 284-end); FYI, our warm-up tomorrow will deal with a different part of the text

Due Monday, September 21

English 11: typed, second full draft of Catcher essay due on paper (30 HW points)

English 11 Eta: completed HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1

English 11 Epsilon: diagram the sentences on the sheet taped into your Writing notes with the heading What grammatical patterns do you see in the sentences below? for #3 and #4, treat "sick and tired" as a single word. Feel free to label the parts of sentence and the parts of speech if that helps you (not required this time around -- we'll be talking about that, but looking at the diagrams, on Monday).

HEX: Review through p. 284 (includes the island of the meerkats) of The Life of Pi. Please re-read p. 148-151 (Ch. 53 for Graham). Come to class prepared to pick up today's conversation about believability and unbelievability.

AP: Typed, revised 2nd draft of Orwell/Words Matter essay due Monday. Do your best to follow MLA format (which we'll talk about on Monday).

Due Friday, September 18

HEX: Answer the following questions in the warm-up section of your notebook...
1. What does Pi find attractive about each of the religions he practices (Hinduism, Christianity, Islam)?
2. What similarities do you see among these religions, based on the text and what you know about each?
3. What differences do you see among them?

English 11 Epsilon and Eta: what changes do you plan to make to your draft, based on your feedback from today? (respond on your peer conference sheet -- 10 HW points).

Due Thursday, September 17

English 11 Eta: draft, on paper, of all 3 portions of the essay (30 HW points)

AP: Folks who were "writers" in today's peer conferences, answer the following question on your peer conference sheet: what changes do you plan to make in your essay as a result of today's feedback?

HEX: Homework side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1

Due Wednesday, September 16
AP: essay draft and peer conference questions (20 HW and 10 HW points, respectively)

English 11 Epsilon: draft, on paper, of all 3 portions of the essay (30 HW points)

Due Tuesday, September 15
English 11: draft, on paper, of all 3 portions of the essay (30 HW points)

HEX: no new HW (have Mon. and Fri. HW ready to hand in)

Due Monday, September 14
HEX: Review pp. 166-top of 229 (Ch. 58-83); Select and write out three quotations (narration or dialogue), or the beginnings of longer passages, from these pages of The Life of Pi that seem particularly striking to you. Write also the reason you selected it (possible reasons for selection: philosophical importance, powerful description, character revelation, plot twist...). Write also what exactly the quote shows or tells us about Pi, the story, or the world or Pi’s view of it. (10 HW points; to be submitted Tuesday)

English 11: draft of the Holden portion of the essay

AP: finish reading questions for "PaEL"

Due Friday, September 11
English 11 Epsilon and Eta: no new homework for Friday. Friday's class will see you starting work on an essay on The Catcher in the Rye, and Monday's working in earnest on your rough draft (a laptop cart will not be provided)

HEX: On a sheet of paper...
Select and write out three quotations (narration or dialogue), or the beginnings of longer passages, from pp. 77-166 of The Life of Pi that seem particularly striking to you. Write also the reason you selected it (possible reasons for selection: philosophical importance, powerful description, character revelation, plot twist...). Write also what exactly the quote shows or tells us about Pi, the story, or the world or Pi’s view of it. (10 HW points; to be submitted Tuesday)

AP: read and annotate "Politics and the English Language." Begin recording responses to the reading questions.

Due Thursday, September 10
HEX: review pp. 77-166 of The Life of Pi. Skim the text; focus on annotations you made.

AP: Respond in writing to the two questions on the Ellen Willis handout from today. Limit your responses to what you can fit on the piece of paper itself (you may use both sides) (10 HW points).

English 11 Eta: Summarize the thinking we've done in and out of class to respond to this question: "What's eating Holden Caulfield?" Go beyond the literal. (10 HW points for a response that is not less than 1 double-spaced typed or handwritten page of text; please no funny business with font size and margins).

Due Wednesday, September 9
AP: Summarize today's discussion in an another paragraph that you add to yesterday's writing. In another paragraph, reflect in writing on one way your thinking about an idea or issue from 1984 has changed or evolved via our discussion. In another paragraph, further explore or extend your thinking about an idea or issue from 1984 that came up in discussion and intrigues you (value: 30 HW points).
Ray and Matt: finish the 1984 Test-Like Artifact. Please come to tutorial on Tuesday to pick up course materials and the prompts for past warm-ups.

English 11: Summarize the thinking we've done in and out of class to respond to this question: "What's eating Holden Caulfield?" Go beyond the literal. (10 HW points for a response that is not less than 1 double-spaced typed or handwritten page of text; please no funny business with font size and margins).

Due Tuesday, September 8
English 11: Review the rest of Catcher (Ch. 24-end)

HEX: Review pp. 45-77 of The Life of Pi

Due Friday, September 4
English 11 -- BOTH CLASSES: review Ch. 21-24 of Catcher

English 11 Eta: bring an independent reading book to tomorrow's double period

English 11 Epsilon: Review Ch. 21-24 of Catcher. Answer the following questions in the Warm-up section of your notebook --
1. Why do you think Holden wants to run off with Sally?
2. Luce asks, "Is this going to be a typical Caulfield conversation?" (160). What do you think he means by this? How come you think so?
3. Record a quote from pp. 171-173 that sticks out for you. Explain why it does so.

HEX: review (skim, focusing on annotations you may have made) pp. vii-45 of The Life of Pi; re-read the Author's Note

AP: Compose a summary of the past two days' conversation. Do not write less than 1/2 of a single-spaced typed page. Do not write (much) more than 1 single-spaced typed page. This will be incorporated into your discussion reflection work.


Due Thursday, September 3
HEX: Locate where you think your own identity lies on the chart we've constructed (x-axis ranges from "identity changes with context and social situation" to "identity remains constant regardless of situation or code-switching"; y-axis ranges from "I determine my own identity" to "others determine my identity"). Explain why you think the way you do -- be thorough, thoughtful, and accurate (10 HW points for completion); bring The Life of Pi and an IR (independent reading) book to class

English 11 Eta: Review Ch. 18-20 of Catcher (bring independent reading book to double period class this week -- Friday for this class)

AP: Review your notes both from today's conversation and in preparation for today's conversation. Come to class prepared to ask questions that you think will effectively re-start our conversation and to answer questions from Mr. Day designed to do the same.

Due Wednesday, September 2
AP: 1984 Test-like Artifact; prep for Socratic discussion (use your and your classmates' questions and notes -- please post to the shared doc (check your email)) -- be ready with ideas and textual references to use in response to the questions you think are most significant

English 11 Epsilon: Review Ch. 18-20 of Catcher; bring independent reading book to double period class this week

Due Tuesday, September 1
HEX and English 11: summer choice reading assignment

English 11: Review Ch. 15-17 of Catcher

Due Monday, August 31
HEX and English 11: bring large notebook OR binder and dividers -- we're getting organized! (AP students: binder, please!)

English 11: Review Ch. 11-14 of Catcher

Eng. 11 Epsilon: Phony/Holden assignment

AP: There are two additions here...
1. Compose three questions you think will generate productive, insightful discussion of 1984 (especially as related to the field of rhetoric). For each, make notes on a) why you think this is a good question for discussion, and b) what moments and events in the text, with page #'s, would be good to examine for discussing this question. Allegra: I said "make notes on" to keep you from literally doing too much. You should not come to class on Monday with more than 1 sheet of paper with writing on only 1 side.
2. Bring your binder, paper, dividers, and whatnot so we can organize ourselves and start writing warm-ups and taking notes the usual way.
3. Please paraphrase (create statements with approximately the same meaning using your own words, hopefully simplifying and clarifying in the process) in writing one piece of text from Abigail Adams' letter (5 HW points).
Teddy: line 1 though line 8
Sylvie: line 9 through line 15
Elias: line 16 through line 26
Allegra: line 27 through line 34
Ethan: line 34 (The sentence beginning "All history...") through line 43
Kayla: line 43 (The sentence beginning "Yet it is your lot...") through 49
Eleanor: line 50 through line 56
Sarah: line 57 through the end

Due Friday, August 28
HEX: Come to class ready to start an assignment on the two books you read by choice this summer (in-class assessment tomorrow).

Eng. 11: Come to class ready to start an assignment on the three books you read by choice over the summer (in-class assessment tomorrow).

Due Thursday, August 27

AP: Consider the arrangement of both 1) the letter you have composed, and 2) the letter Abigail Adams wrote to John Quincy. How are the different rhetorical strategies the author uses assembled and deployed in relation to each other? Why are they arranged in this manner and order -- how does this order help the author achieve her purpose, given her own position and her audience? (beeteedubs: Leith says that refutation is primarily a logos appeal -- this came up today in class)

HEX: Produce MLA format Works Cited entries for two books you read by choice to satisfy the summer reading requirement. PLEASE REMEMBER TO DOUBLE-SPACE. (10 HW points)

English 11: Produce MLA format Works Cited entries for the three books you read by choice to satisfy the summer reading requirement. PLEASE REMEMBER TO DOUBLE-SPACE. (10 HW points). Also, review Ch. 8-10 of The Catcher in the Rye.

HEX and English 11 students -- Did you neglect to record the information helpfully posted on our wall that is necessary to construct a Works Cited entry? Did you neglect to be as awesome as a certain student who came in during tutorial to take this information down on paper (you know who you are!)? Please accept this token of my magnanimity (I'm not sure why it's "zipped," as it's not that big):

If this fails you, my hunch is that somewhere on the Internet you can find directions for an MLA format Works Cited page.

Due Wednesday, August 26
English 11 (both sections), AP: bring signed and completed personal information sheet from first day letter and syllabus (10 HW points)

AP, English 11: bring completed and signed (both by you and an adult family member or guardian) information sheets from the syllabus (10 HW points)

HEX: Take 10-15 minutes to make notes on the questions on the reverse of today's warm-up sheet (yes, do both sets; no, this will not be graded, but eventually you will submit a more complete version of this that will be for credit)

Due Tuesday, August 25
HEX (English 10 Honors): Review and bring The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian; complete "Asphodel" assignment (10 HW points); bring signed and completed personal information sheet from first day letter and syllabus (10 HW points)

English 11 (both sections): Review Ch. 1-7 of Catcher (and bring your copy of the text)

AP: Compose a letter to your parent(s) or guardian(s); attempt to convince her/him/them to do or buy something for you that you really want (20 HW points)





English 11 students: Shmoop yourself some Gatsby -- http://www.shmoop.com/great-gatsby/.
Q: "Hey, it's cheating to just read the plot summaries and then come to class!"
A: "Which is exactly why your books can be collected for annotations at any moment."

Due Monday, June 1
EXH, English 11 Alpha, English 11 Delta: all revisions for Q4

AP: Final project due

Due Friday, May 29
EXH: Review Maus (both volumes) and the Odyssey -- come to class with lists of quotations (or at least lists of page numbers that refer to well-marked quotations, with the first few words of the quotations) that you think might appear on the exam -- feel free to divide and conquer here, as you will have time to compare notes with classmates in class tomorrow (please bring these texts to class tomorrow); continue work on the Character Dialogue essay

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #30 (20 HW points); work on your character/author dialogue essay planning; review your annotations and make some predictions about which quotes may appear on the final, so you can study and practice with these

AP: Go to this link, and play the Gatsby video game you find there at least 5 times (hopefully it is functioning): http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2013/05/the_great_gatsby_the_video_game_can_you_attain_the_american_dream.html (use the "m" and "n" keys to row). Then, in a thoughtful paragraph, explain how the game conveys the same message -- makes the same argument! -- as Nick's valediction (p. 179-180) (10 HW points); continue work on your final project

Due Thursday, May 28
EXH: Review The Book Thief, Passing, and The Tempest -- come to class with lists of quotations (or at least lists of page numbers that refer to well-marked quotations, with the first few words of the quotations) that you think might appear on the exam -- feel free to divide and conquer here, as you will have time to compare notes with classmates in class tomorrow (please bring these texts to class tomorrow); begin work on the Character Dialogue essay

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 9 of Gatsby; continue work on your final project

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 9 of Gatsby; please bring Catcher, The Scarlet Letter, and Gatsby to class tomorrow

Due Wednesday, May 27
EXH: Read and annotate Books 23 and 24 of the Odyssey

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 8 of Gatsby

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 7 and 8 of Gatsby; work on your final project

Due Tuesday, May 26
EXH: Optional -- read Book 20 of The Odyssey (alternative: read a summary); Not Optional -- read and annotate Books 21-24 (4 annotations per page) for Tuesday (we will not get to talk about Books 23 and 24 until Wednesday, if you need to space out your reading); AP application essays due to Mr. Day

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #29 (both sides); read and annotate Chapter 7 of The Great Gatsby; Honors Humanities application essays due to Mr. Clausen

AP: LAST DAY TO SUBMIT REVISIONS FOR Q4!!!!! Also, read and annotate Ch. 7 of The Great Gatsby

Due Friday, May 22
English 10 Honors and AP English Lang: Grammar, punctuation, and sentence diagramming test on Friday

EXH: Complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #28 and/or #29 as practice for Friday's test -- note that these are not graded assignments

Due Thursday, May 21
English 11 Alpha: Read and annotate (3 annotations per page) Ch. 6 of Gatsby (annotations check on Thursday)

English 11 Delta: Read and annotate (3 annotations per page) Ch. 7 of Gatsby (annotations check on Thursday)

Due Wednesday, May 20
EXH: Optional -- read Books 17 and 18 of The Odyssey; Not Optional -- read and annotate Book 19 (and find out what happens in Books 17 and 18)

English 11 Delta: Read and annotate (3 annotations per page) Ch. 6 of Gatsby (annotations check on Thursday)
Due Tuesday, May 19
English 11 Alpha and Delta: Typed, double-spaced, edited and proofread final draft of Gatsby film essay

EXH: Typed, double-spaced, edited and proofread draft of essay on narrative, storytelling, and the Odyssey; read through Books 13-16, if you're going to read them (no need to annotate)

AP: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #28, both sides (10 HW points; 10 CW points); read and annotate/review Ch. 5 of Gatsby

Due Monday, May 18
English 11 Alpha and Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #28 (both sides); read and annotate Ch. 4 of Gatsby (3 notes per page)

AP: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #28 (both sides); read and annotate Ch. 4-5 of Gatsby

EXH: Typed, double-spaced, edited and proofread draft of essay on narrative, storytelling, and the Odyssey due Tuesday; read and annotate Book 12 of the Odyssey for Monday (note that you will also need to read, but not annotate, Books 13-16 for Tuesday)

Due Friday, May 15
English 11 Alpha:

AP:

EXH: Typed second draft of essay due Friday (20 HW points)

Due Thursday, May 14
English 11 Alpha: typed full draft of Gatsby film evaluation essay (20 HW points)

English 11 Delta: Add a conclusion to your essay draft, if you haven't already; feel free to follow the model from class today (if you were absent, show Mr. Day your draft in class on Thursday for your homework credit); bring your essay draft tomorrow as we may have time for editing and proofreading

Due Wednesday, May 13
AP: Sleep. Rest. Do your best. Be on time or early to tomorrow's exam.

English 11 Delta: typed full draft of Gatsby film evaluation essay (20 HW points)

EXH:
A. Email Mr. Day, answering the following two questions (10 HW points if completed before Friday):
--1. Which of your peer conference questions solicited the most helpful feedback for you, and how come you think so?
--2. What changes do you plan to make to your essay as you revise?
B. Read and annotate Book 11 of the Odyssey (1/2 HW point per page with 4 written annotations)
C. Typed 2nd draft of essay due Friday (20 HW points)

Due Tuesday, May 12
EXH: Rough draft of essay on storytelling and the Odyssey (20 HW points); read and annotate Book 10 (1/2 HW point per page), if you haven't already, or scan your annotations if you have; bring a sheet of paper to class tomorrow with three questions designed to solicit helpful feedback from a conference partner on your essay

AP: Sleep. Rest. If you are interested in reviewing rhetorical devices, flip through Little to look for questions about them (many of them won't require much reading to answer); you can also study the terms and definitions on your handout

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 3 of Gatsby (3 written annotations per page; review the text and your annotations if you have done this already); complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #27 if you haven't yet
Due Monday, May 11
English 11 Alpha and Delta, AP: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #27 (both sides); draft body paragraphs of essay (20 HW points); review Ch. 3 of Gatsby

EXH: Re-read and annotate, or scan, Book 9 of the Odyssey, and read and annotate Book 10. (1/2 HW point per page with 4 annotations)


AP: It's on you at this point. If you would like to do work to prepare to do your best on the exam:
--Select questions involving rhetorical devices from Little to get a better grip on which one is which (asyndeton vs. anaphora, etc.)
--Work your way through practice exam #2 in Big

Due Friday, May 8
EXH: gather evidence/quotations/examples to use in Friday's essay-drafting session, and construct some semblance of a thesis statement. If you were absent on Tuesday, here's the prompt:


English 11 Alpha: On a sheet of paper, write 3 examples of ways in which each Gatsby film departs from the novel, and for each explain why the director might have made this change (6 total changes, 6 total explanations) (10 HW points)

AP: For each of the Rhetorical Analysis Essay texts, identify 4-5 strategies you see the writer or speaker using that could be analyzed or written about in an essay

Due Thursday, May 7
English 11 Delta: On a sheet of paper, write 3 examples of ways in which each Gatsby film departs from the novel, and for each explain why the director might have made this change (6 total changes, 6 total explanations) (10 HW points)

English 11 Alpha: Read and annotate Ch. 3 of Gatsby (3 written annotations per page, please)

AP: Get some sleep. Seriously, get some sleep.



Due Wednesday, May 6
AP: Pick any two selections from Little that we haven't done yet. Complete one of them (recording your answers on a sheet of paper) taking as much time as you like. Then complete the other in 12 timed minutes (again, recording your answers on a sheet of paper). Check your answers, and reflect briefly in writing on your thought process for items you answered incorrectly. Value: 20 HW points for thoughtful completion

English 11 Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 3 of Gatsby ( written annotations per page, please)

EXH: Read and annotate Ch. 9 of the Odyssey. Folks who did not remember to pick up your books this afternoon: it is relatively easy (very easy, actually) to find the translation we are using online. Go find and read it there.

ATTENTION ENGLISH 11 STUDENTS: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #26 will be due on TUESDAY

Due Tuesday, May 5
English 11 Alpha: Typed final draft of Whitman/Dickinson poem (up to 22 major assignment points)

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #26; review (finish?) your annotations for Ch. 2 of Gatsby

EXH: Review the moments you found when characters tell stories to each other -- make at least 1/2 page of written notes (10 HW points). We will have a Socratic discussion or essay tomorrow on the following: Why do we tell stories? Why are they important to us, and in the Odyssey?

Due Monday, May 4
English 11 Alpha: Typed final draft of Whitman/Dickinson poem (up to 21 major assignment points)

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 1-2 of Gatsby (3 written annotations per page, please)

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 1-2 of Gatsby; come in armed with pieces of text to talk about

EXH: Catch up on your annotations, if you're behind; find and mark points in the text of the Odyssey where characters tell stories to each other, and where Nausicaa appears

Due Friday, May 1
EXH: Read and annotate Books 7-8 of the Odyssey

English 11 Alpha: Typed final draft of Whitman/Dickinson poem (up to 22 major assignment points)

AP: Read up on protests, rioting, and events in Baltimore -- and their causes

Due Thursday, April 30
English 11 Alpha: 2nd draft of Whitman/Dickinson poem -- clean, revised copy (10 HW points)

English 11 Delta: Typed final draft of Whitman/Dickinson poem (up to 20 major assignment points)

AP: Compose one body paragraph for a rhetorical analysis essay on TNH's The Heart of Understanding.

Due Wednesday, April 29
AP: Compose an introductory paragraph of a rhetorical analysis essay on TNH's The Heart of Understanding. Use pp. 124-129 of Everything's An Argument and your class notes from the last few days to help you. Include the 6 "W"'s (including two "who"'s), a hypo-thesis, and the main ideas of the body paragraphs (20 HW points)

English 11 Delta: 2nd draft of Whitman/Dickinson poem -- clean, revised copy (10 HW points)

Due Tuesday, April 28
English 11 Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #25

EXH: Read and annotate Book 6 of The Odyssey

English 11 Alpha: Complete a rough draft of your poem in the style of Emily Dickinson or Walt Whitman (20 HW points for a complete draft)

English 11 Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #25

Due Monday, April 27
EXH, AP, English 11 Alpha: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #25

English 11 Delta: Rough draft of Whitman/Dickinson poem (20 HW points for full-length draft)

EXH: Find and label 15 literary devices on p. 154 of the Odyssey

AP students: Be outside the exterior door to the MPR just before 8 am on Saturday with the following: writing tools, a small snack, 5-->5 Big, and lined paper for the full-length practice test. If you know that you cannot make this, you must make alternative arrangements in person with Mr. Day before Saturday. The practice test begins on p. 177, with the multiple choice answer sheet. You will have 1 hour for the multiple choice section, followed by a short break (during which you should eat your snack, drink something, and go to the bathroom). You will then have 15 minutes to read, annotated, and start thinking and taking notes on how you will use the texts for the synthesis essay (Question #2 in the practice test). You will then have two hours to compose your essays (it is advisable to write the synthesis essay first. Construct a rough outline (shorthand thesis and body paragraph main ideas, plus which sources to use when for the synthesis essay) before you begin drafting.

Due Friday, April 24
AP: Skydiving metaphor assignment (up to 40 HW points); Bring 5-->5 Big; read and annotate the sections of the EAA chapter on rhetorical analysis that we identified as important to us today (97 -- Composing a Rhetorical Analysis, 99 Understanding Who Makes..., 101 Identifying and Appealing to the Audience... 103 -- Pathos, 105 -- Ethos, 107 -- Logos, 111 -- Looking at Style, 124-129 Writing a Rhetorical Analysis); bring The Heart of Understanding

EXH: Read and annotate Book 5 of the Odyssey

Due Thursday, April 23
EXH: Read and annotate Book 5 of the Odyssey


AP: "lightly" read the rhetorical analysis chapter from Everything's An Argument (which sections will be most valuable for us to pay attention to for the purposes of the AP exam?); bring 5-->5 Big if it's not already in our room


English 11 Delta: Complete either of the two pages of brainstorming questions for drafting a Whitman/Dickinson poem

Due Wednesday, April 22
EXH: Read and annotate Book 4 of the Odyssey

AP: Bring 5-->5 Big to class

Due Tuesday, April 21
EXH: Passing books for annotations check; read and annotate Book 3 of the Odyssey. Students who were absent today: remember to turn in Sentence Diagramming Exercise #24 (a key for the diagrams is posted in the hallway outside our classroom).

AP: Bring 5-->5 Big to class on Wednesday

Due Monday, April 20
All classes: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #24

EXH: Read and annotate Books 1-2 of the Odyssey (4 annotations per page, 1 HW point per page, at least for now).

AP: You may find it worth your while to re-read the last three chapters of The Heart of Understanding as a way to relax yourself after Saturday's test.

English 11 Delta: complete the column in the graphic organizer you received at the end of class that corresponds to your poem (10 HW points).

Due Friday, April 17
English 11 Delta: complete the column in the graphic organizer you received at the end of class that corresponds to your poem (10 HW points).

English 11 Alpha: It is a good idea to complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #24 tonight. You will have more homework for Monday.

AP: Read and annotate the rest of The Heart of Understanding, if you haven't yet. If you would like less work over the weekend (you've got a practice test, remember?), you should do

EXH: Write a 1-paragraph summary of your discussion today. Write a second paragraph exploring or analyzing an idea from the discussion you found interesting or striking -- be thorough, thoughtful, and accurate. Due Friday with discussion prep notes and summary paragraph. Value: up to 40 HW points.

Due Thursday, April 16
English 11 Alpha: re-read all four poems in our Whitman and Dickinson packet

Due Wednesday, April 15
AP: Re-re-read and annotate pp. 37-41 of The Heart of Understanding. Be outside the door to the MPR just before 8 am on Saturday with the following: writing tools, a small snack, 5-->5 Big, and lined paper. If you know that you cannot make this practice test, you must make alternative arrangements with Mr. Day.

English 11 Delta: re-read all four poems in our Whitman and Dickinson packet

EXH: prepare for tomorrow's Socratic discussion...
Tomorrow, we will engage in a discussion of the following three questions:

1. How do friends, family, culture, and race shape a person’s identity?

2. How much can we consciously control our personal identities?

3. How much of our personal identities are determined for us?

The primary texts we will use to fuel our thinking and conversation will be Passing, and our own lives.

To prepare: Take some time to think and write about characters, words, and events in the text (and your life) that could be useful for thinking about each of these questions. Write 1/2 to 1 page (hand-written, single-spaced), or the double-spaced or typewritten equivalent. This will be submitted with your discussion reflection, which will be due Friday.


Due Tuesday, April 14
EXH: Conduct further research in Passing -- where in the text are we able to see the (multiple, complicated, ambivalent) ways Irene thinks about race and racial identity? Further mark up your texts.

English 10 Delta: Re-read all 4 poems in your Whitman and Dickinson packet

English 11 Alpha: Re-read the two Dickinson poems and "The Wound Dresser," by Walt Whitman. Read and annotate "Song of Myself" (read it at least twice, preferably out loud at least once), and answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper (value: 10 HW points for thoughtful completion):
1. What does Whitman first say that the grass is, in response to the child?
2. a) b) c) What are the next three things that he says it may be?
3. How do both Whitman and the grass feel about people of different races?
4. What is the last thing that Whitman says the grass seems to be?
5. What do you think this might mean?
6. a) b) c) What are three different kinds of people (whose graves) Whitman says the grass may grow from?
7. What is something that is confusing to Whitman about the grass?
8. What is Whitman's answer to the two questions he asks in the third-to-last stanza?
9. Explain what what you think Whitman might mean by the second line of the second-to-last stanza?
10. What do you think Whitman might mean in the last line? (Why is dying "different from what any one supposed"? Why is it "luckier"?)

English 10 Alpha:
Due Monday, April 13
All classes: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #23

EXH: Find (and be ready to name in class on Monday) two additional texts (songs, films, stories, poems, musical thee-aytur...) with unreliable (untrustworthy) narrators; do not forget to complete SDE #23

AP: Finish Heart of Understanding review questions; read and annotate pp. 37-41 of The Heart of Understanding (do this at least twice); see Mr. Day during tutorial if you are not able to come to the practice exam on the morning of the 18th.

English 11 Delta: read and annotate the excerpt from "The Wound Dresser," by Walt Whitman

Due Friday, April 10
EXH: Fill in 2 more observations on today's organizer. What assumptions must be true for these to be evidence that Irene pushed Clare? Also, spend some more time doing research in the text of Passing. This time, look for the following: What evidence is there in the text for inferring that Irene's thinking is unreliable or untrustworthy, or that she might not be entirely mentally stable? (Look all over in the text.)

Due Thursday, April 9
English 11 Alpha: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #22

English 11 Delta: Re-read the excerpt from "Song of Myself" at least twice. Be prepared for a warm-up in the morning that reviews our afternoon's conversation.

AP: Sentence diagramming exercise 22 is due at the start of class, if you are Jordan, Kaliyah, Kayla, Asia, or Owen (Iyanna, you may wish to do the class work portion). Review ALL of The Heart of Understanding for tomorrow's class.

Due Wednesday, April 8
English 11 Delta: Re-read the Dickinson poem we worked on today at least twice. Read each of the Whitman poems at least once (do not worry overmuch if you struggle to make sense of them; just hear the words and rhythm in your head)

English 10 Honors: What evidence is there (not only in the final chapter) that Irene kills Clare in Passing? No need to record text on a separate sheet of paper -- mark up your books.
ATTENTION ALL CLASSES: ALL REVISIONS OF ALL WORK ARE DUE BEFORE MR. DAY LEAVES SCHOOL ON FRIDAY, MARCH 27, UNLESS PRIOR ARRANGEMENTS ARE MADE WITH MR. DAY

Scarlet Letter Resources for English 11 -- USE THESE!
Chapter summaries -- http://shmoop.com/scarlet-letter/chapter-1-summary.html (there's a menu on the left-hand side)
Audio text -- http://www.loudlit.org/works/scarletletter.htm

Due Thursday, March 26
AP: Re-read "Happy Continuation," "Roses and Garbage," and "The Moon Is Always the Moon." The more prepared we are for tomorrow's conversation, the better we'll be able to dig into the text.

English 11 Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #22 due tomorrow; make plans to finish your test, if you need to.

Due Wednesday, March 25
AP: Have pp. 17-36 of The Heart of Understanding read and annotated and least twice over by Wednesday

Due Tuesday, March 24
English 11 Alpha and Delta: catch up on your annotations for The Scarlet Letter; Alpha -- we will go over SDE 21 in class tomorrow, so bring it.

EXH: Breathe. Rest. If you did your best today, good job! Be ready to do it again, tomorrow; do your best, even (and especially) when things are challenging.

Due Monday, March 23
All classes: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #21

AP: re-read and annotate pp. 13-26 of The Heart of Understanding

EXH: In case you weren't here on Friday -- the Literary Analysis essays are graded and in PowerSchool, and everyone showed that they grasp the nature of this difficult task (analyzing a text in terms of how the author makes choices, not only in terms of what it means). You are in good shape for next week's exams. Breathe. Eat. Sleep.

Due Friday, March 20
English 11 Alpha: catch up on your annotations

AP:
Due Thursday, March 19
English 11 Alpha: catch up on your annotations; come to our next class with 1 page # and 1 quotation for each of your assigned event(s) in The Scarlet Letter (10 HW points)

AP: read and annotate pp. 9-26 of The Heart of Understanding; do this twice

English 11 Delta: catch up on your annotations

Due Wednesday, March 18
AP: Read and annotate through p. 8 of The Heart of Understanding. Do this twice, please.

EXH: Read and annotate (3 written notes per page) the rest of Passing.

English 11 Delta: catch up on your annotations; come to our next class with 1 page # and 1 quotation for each of your assigned event(s) in The Scarlet Letter (10 HW points)

Due Tuesday, March 17
EXH: Read and annotate (3 notations per page, please). through p. 65 of Passing

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Complete your annotations tally chart (how many annotations of each type do you have for each reading assignment or cluster of pages?); bring your text and notebook tomorrow; get caught up in your annotations, if you are behind (books due soon)

Due Monday, March 16
EXH: Read and annotate (3 notes per page) pp. 1-47 of Passing

AP: Read and annotate the foreword and pp. 1-4 of The Heart of Understanding. Then do it again, slightly more slowly.

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate (at least 5 pp. with 3 notes per page) Ch. 21-24 of The Scarlet Letter

Due Friday, March 13
AP: Complete the Ruskin (p. 49 -- #141-150), Perkins Gilman (p. 161 -- #471-480), and Schreiner (p. 167 -- #491-500) section of Little. Record your answers on a separate sheet of paper, check the answer key, and write brief reflections on your thought process for items you answered incorrectly (15 HW points).

EXH: Breathe.

Sentence Diagramming Test Dates:
Alpha: March 12
Beta: March 11 (will include vocabulary section)
Gamma: March 12 (will include vocabulary section)
Delta: March 11

Due Thursday, March 12
English 11 Delta: Read (and annotate 5 pages of with 3 written annotations) Ch. 21-24 of The Scarlet Letter

AP: bring Little tomorrow, in addition to your readiness for the grammar, diagramming, and vocabulary test

Due Wednesday, March 11
AP: DIY Modest Proposal essay, with at least 6 underlined and labeled rhetorical devices; study for Thursday's test

Due Tuesday, March 10
English 11 Alpha and Delta: review Ch. 17-20 of The Scarlet Letter


EXH: study for Wednesday's vocabulary and sentence diagramming test; spend time with Sonnets 18 and 55 (continue our thinking from class today); you may turn in SDE 19 on Tuesday if you wish.

Due Monday, March 9
All classes: SDE #19 -- BOTH SIDES!

AP: Swift Questions from Wednesday's class (28 CW points) -- if no school on Thursday

EXH: Study vocabulary

Due Thursday, March 5
English 11 Alpha: Finish reading and annotating Ch. 19-20 of The Scarlet Letter (include at least 3 written annotations on at least 5 pages for Ch. 16-20)

Due Wednesday, March 4
EXH: study your vocabulary

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Finish reading and annotating Ch. 19-20 of The Scarlet Letter (include at least 3 written annotations on at least 5 pages for Ch. 16-20)

Due Tuesday, March 3
English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 16-20 of The Scarlet Letter (include at least 3 written annotations on at least 5 pages)

EXH: Memorize Sonnet 18 or 55

AP: Complete Swift (p. 130), Steele (p. 134), and Pepys (p. 116) portions of Little. As usual, record your answers on a separate sheet of paper, check your answers, and reflect briefly in writing on your thought process for items you answered incorrectly (15 HW points). Work to complete all three portions in 30 min. Pace yourself.

Due Monday, March 2
All classes: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #18

AP: re-read and annotate "A Modest Proposal" -- watch for the rhetorical structure of the essay: when does Swift anticipate and rebut criticism? when does he point out the flaws in others' ideas? when does he make ethos appeals? when does he qualify his own notions? what strategies does he use to support his main idea?

Due Friday, February 27
EXH: Tempest projects due (120 MA points)

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read (and annotate at least 5 pages of, with 3 written notes per page) Ch. 13-16 of The Scarlet Letter.

Due Wednesday, February 25
AP: typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, and proofread second draft of natural rights essay, with at least six underlined and labeled rhetorical devices (36 MA points)

Due Tuesday, February 24
English 11 Alpha and Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #17

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 13-16 of The Scarlet Letter. Include at least three annotations on at least five pages.

English 11 Alpha: re-read and annotate (3 notes per page) from the middle of p. 125 until the words "he loathed his miserable self" on p. 126, and from the bottom of p. 114 through p. 116 of The Scarlet Letter

EXH: Line-by-line sheet for POL poem of your choice; can you memorize Sonnet 18 or 55?

Due Monday, February 23
EXH: Line-by-line sheet for the poem of your choice; work to memorize sonnet 18 or 55

AP: rough draft of natural rights essay due (20 HW points)

EXH and AP: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #17

Due Friday, February 20
EXH: bring paper drafts of Tempest projects (including texts and stage directions for performance groups)

Due Thursday, February 19
AP: Read and annotate Ch. 6 in 5-5 Big (argumentative essay chapter); bring Big tomorrow

Due TUESDAY, February 17 (WEDNESDAY, February 18 for AP)
English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 9-12 of The Scarlet Letter (have at least 5 pp. with at least 3 written annotations each)

All classes: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #16 (either side)

AP: Complete the Paine (p. 91, #271-280), Machiavelli (p. 103, #301-310), and Hobbes (p. 109, #321-330) sections of 5-->5 Little. As always, record your answers on a separate sheet of paper, check your answers, and reflect briefly in writing on your thought process for items you answered incorrectly. Please bring 5-5 Little to class on Tuesday (which is Wednesday).

EXH: You will need to have Sonnet 18 memorized by the end of next week, and please continue work on your Tempest projects -- memorize lines, flesh out drafts of essays and analyses and reflections (if you are in a performance group, it is not enough to state and describe your understanding of the character(s); you must also explain why and how you believe your thesis about the character to be true, using and explaining evidence from the text).

AP and EXH: the vocabulary and grammar (and diagramming) test will most likely be March 4 (EXH) or 5 (AP).
English 11 Alpha and Delta: the grammar (and diagramming) test will most likely be March 3 (Alpha) or 4 (Delta).

Due Friday, February 13
EXH: Poetry Out Loud Scavenger Hunt; memorize "Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening"


AP: Finish Thoreau packet and Selma reflection

Due Thursday, February 12
AP: Read and answer reading questions for the remaining pages of "Civil Disobedience"

Due Tuesday, February 10
EXH: accomplish homework tasks you identified in class today

Due Monday, February 9
All classes: Sentence Diagramming Exercise 15

AP: Read and annotate and complete reading questions for pp. 9-10 of "Civil Disobedience"; read and annotate the two articles on Selma; for the first, concentrate on the section about the question "What do you think of the way the relationship between Johnson and MLK is depicted...?"

EXH: Rough drafts of all written portions of Tempest projects (20 HW points)

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read Ch. 5-8 of The Scarlet Letter. Make at least 3 written annotations on at least 5 pages.

Due Friday, February 6
English 11 Alpha: Puritans Packet due (I know I said Thursday in class, but I will be absent) (Value: 30 class work points)

AP: Read and answer questions for pp. 4-8 of "Civil Disobedience."

Due Thursday, February 5
Eng. 11 Alpha: Read and annotate Ch. 1-4 of The Scarlet Letter (start on p. 45) Include at least 3 written annotations on at least 5 pages (I know I said 10 in class on Monday; I changed my mind).

Due Wednesday, February 4
Eng. 11 Delta: Puritans packet due (Value: 30 class work points); read and annotate Ch. 1-4 of The Scarlet Letter. Include at least 3 written annotations on at least 5 pages (I know I said 10 in class; I changed my mind). Start on p. 45.

AP: Read and annotate pp. 1-3 of "Civil Disobedience," and answer the appropriate questions in your reading packet

Due Tuesday, February 3
EXH: Email your thesis statement(s) to Mr. Day

Eng. 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 1-4 of The Scarlet Letter. Include at least 3 written annotations on at least 5 pages (I know I said 10 in class; I changed my mind). Start on p. 45.

Due Monday, February 2
All classes: Sentence diagramming exercise #14

EXH:
1. Re-read relevant parts of The Tempest (relevant to your project, i.e.) -- passages that help you understand the character(s) you are working with
2. Record (write out) or list (by act, scene, and line #) useful quotations and what you think they show you that matters for your project
3. Develop a preliminary thesis (guiding understanding) for each character you're working with.
3a -- writers: you need multiple theses if you're considering different ways of thinking about a character or characters
3b -- recitors and actors: you need both a general thesis or guiding understanding for each character across the whole play and a thesis for each character that is specific to the scene/speech you're working with (character's motivation, mood, tone towards others...)
4. Be ready to report on your work to each other and Mr. Day on Monday.
Point value: If you can see the relevance of this work to the work you hope to produce, you understand that the quality of your final project will reflect the quality and completion of this work now. If you cannot, please think on that, and then do the work to the very best of your ability.


AP: Complete Carlyle (p. 22, #61-70), Churchill (p. 26, #71-80), and Gibbon (p. 121, #351-360) portions of Little. Pace yourself to finish within 35 minutes. Check your answers, and reflect briefly but thoughtfully in writing on questions you answer incorrectly (15 HW points). Do this work on a separate sheet of paper.

Due Friday, January 30
EXH: Continue vocabulary study (front half of brain); think about Tempest project (back half of brain)

AP: Review notes on rhetorical analysis essay, and the chapter in Big on the rhetorical analysis essay (Ch. 5, beginning on p. 67)

Due Thursday, January 29
Alpha, Delta: nothing due

AP: Complete "general questions" on Lincoln; continue vocabulary study

Due Wednesday, January 28
EXH: Continue vocabulary study

AP: Continue vocabulary study

Due Tuesday, January 27
EXH: Continue vocabulary study

Due Monday, January 26
All classes: Sentence diagramming exercise #13

AP: Continue your work on the class vocabulary list on Memrise. Please remember that, having enrolled in this class, you have agreed to undertake an average of one hour of homework per night. Life in Q3 will be much easier for you (as will any vocabulary test we take), if you keep up on your studying.

Due Friday, January 23
EXH: On a half-sheet of paper, explain what you would like to undertake for a major assignment on The Tempest --
-- A significantly-sized essay? (On what topic, theme, or character? What's interesting about this to you?)
-- A solo performance of a major speech in the play, with an accompanying essay/reflection? (Which character and speech? What's interesting about this to you?)
-- A group performance of a scene or selection? (Which scene and characters? What's interesting about this to you? Whom else will you work with?)
Value: 10 HW points

AP: Start working on our new vocabulary Memrise course, currently consisting mostly of test vocabulary -- http://www.memrise.com/course/524593/wlpcs-ap-lang-and-comp-2014-2015/. Complete questions #8 and 9 in the Lincoln packet. Please remember that, having enrolled in this class, you have agreed to undertake an average of one hour of homework per night.

Due Thursday, January 22
English 11 Alpha: On a half-sheet of paper...
1. Summarize a Puritan's outlook on the world
2. How does "Young Goodman Brown" reflect or illustrate this outlook?
3. How could the story be mocking (making fun of) Puritans?
Value: 10 HW points for thoughtful completion and your name on your work.

Due Wednesday, January 21
English 11 Delta: On a half-sheet of paper...
1. Summarize a Puritan's outlook on the world
2. How does "Young Goodman Brown" reflect or illustrate this outlook?
3. How could the story be mocking (making fun of) Puritans?
Value: 10 HW points for thoughtful completion and your name on your work.

EXH: study your vocabulary; re-read 1.2 of The Tempest; finish annotating your text (due... tomorrow?)

Due Tuesday, January 20
English 11 Alpha and Delta: printed out final copies of Holden and personal essays (30 points each; please be sure each includes a thesis and supporting body paragraphs and is double-spaced)

EXH: Spend a considerable amount of time studying your vocabulary notes (use your review sheets); re-read Prospero's last speech several times, and consider the following:
--What is Prospero saying to the audience about himself and the other characters?
--In what ways might this be the actor playing Prospero speaking as himself to the audience?
--In what ways might this be William Shakespeare speaking as himself to the audience?

AP: Sentence Diagramming Exercise 12 due Monday (10 HW points)

Due Friday, January 16
EXH: Compose a list of possible candidates for the moment in the play (or before the play) when Prospero decides or is moved to forgive Antonio and Alonso. Compose your list of possibilities first, then work to comply evidence that might be used to support or argue against each of them. Resist drawing conclusions about each possibility until you have gathered and weighed evidence; do that only after you've gathered and noted evidence for each possibility you think is worth serious consideration (your writing should have a heading for each possibility you're working with, followed by the evidence you believe should be considered for that possibility, and then notes on your consideration of the evidence. Please bear in mind that Prospero is not always truthful with those around him. To what extent can the things that he says be taken for granted, and how can you tell? (Value: 10 HW points) Please also read Prospero's closing speech 5 times.

AP: Complete the Montaigne (p. 65, #191-200), Mill (p. 88, #261-270), and Wollstonecraft (p. 98, #291-300) sections in Little. Record your answers on a separate sheet of paper. Check your answers; write a brief reflection on your thought process for each item you answered correctly (Value: 15 HW points).

Due Thursday, January 15
AP: no new homework

English 10 Delta: see above for essay deadline

Due Wednesday, January 14
EXH: Read and annotate Act V of The Tempest

Due Tuesday, January 13
All classes: Everything that would have been due Monday (see below)

Due Monday, January 12
All classes except AP: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #12

EXH: Respond in writing (maybe on the back of the sheet?) to the "All The World's A Stage" questions (value: 20 HW points, because of the value of the questions). Nota bene (n.b.): you are not to spend more than an hour total on your EXH homework this weekend (SDE 12 plus the "All The World's A Stage" questions)

English 11 Delta and Alpha: Finish revision of the personal and Holden portions of your essay; finish your "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" questions if you haven't yet.

AP:
1. Read the wikipedia entries for "Civil Disobedience (Thoreau)" -- all of it -http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Disobedience_(Thoreau), and "civil disobedience" -- just the parts that appear relevant to Henry David Thoreau -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_disobedience.
2. Re-read the Gettysburg Address at least twice.
3. Complete the 5-5 Little questions for the passages by Jefferson (p. 85, #251-260), de Tocqueville (p. 94, #281-290), and Locke (p. 127, #371-380) -- pace yourself, keep an eye on the clock (can you finish in 30 minutes?); record your answers on a separate sheet of paper, review the correct answers, and write brief reflections on your thought process for each item you answered incorrectly (15 HW points -- 1/2 point per question)

Due Friday, January 9
English 11 Alpha: Listen to the rest of "Sinners" (start at 44 minutes) -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI5qCFksA7Y. Continue to look for images in the text.

AP: Complete the Gettysburg Address multi-media assignment, if you have not already; get enough sleep that you're ready to do your best on tomorrow's synthesis essay

EXH: Begin studying your vocabulary in earnest (definitions, synonyms, antonyms, cognates, roots, phonetic spellings/pronunciations) -- test likely in first 2 weeks of Q3; re-read 4.1.165-175 of The Tempest at least three times

Due Thursday, January 8
English 11 Delta: Listen to the rest of "Sinners" (start at 25 min., 30 sec.) -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI5qCFksA7Y. Continue to look for images in the text.

AP: Complete Gettysburg Address multi-media assignment. Here are the links to the web resources:
Learn the Address (Louis C.K. and Jerry Seinfeld):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfFsScnAmGY
Hennessey's Graphic Novel:
http://www.slate.com/articles/life/history/2013/11/gettysburg_address_history_why_four_score_and_seven_years_ago.html
NY Times Op-Ed from 11/19:
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/17/lincolns-sound-bite-have-faith-in-democracy/
Slate Lexicon Valley Podcast:
http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2012/06/lexicon_valley_lincoln_s_gettysburg_address_as_greek_funeral_oration.html

Due Wednesday, January 7
AP: Write out and label 10 rhetorical devices from the Gettysburg Address (10 HW points); MLK precis and Letter from Birmingham Jail reading questions also due, if you haven't submitted them already. Also, a number of students have not yet turned in their work from #1-40 in 5-5 Little.

EXH: No new HW (we will be talking about Prospero's strength/weakness and Act IV tomorrow)

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Finish your rough drafts of the Holden and personal parts of the essay, if you haven't already.

Due Tuesday, January 6
EXH: Re-read Act IV of The Tempest; complete sentence diagramming exercise #11 (10 HW points)

English 11 Alpha and Delta: If you have not yet completed either or both of the rough drafts for the first two sections of the Catcher essay, get on this ASAP.

Due Friday, December 19
EXH: Write a thoughtful 1/2-1 page-long reflection on today's play performance. Focus on one aspect of the play, or several, or the production overall. But please do not write only vague generalities. (10 HW points for completion)

Due Thursday, December 18
AP: completed "Ballot or the Bullet" worksheet and Sentence Diagramming Exercise #11 (if you wish to go over this, please come to tutorial); Read and annotate "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and complete the reading questions packet. Pay attention to the footnotes -- every time you see something bolded and underlined in the text, there is a note about that concept, term, or person in the notes that follow the body of King's text.

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Rough draft of 2nd part of Catcher essay due at 8 am Thursday via Googledocs (20 HW points)

English 11 Delta: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #11 (10 HW points)

Due Wednesday, December 17
AP: Bring 5-5 Little to class (you will be either working from this or writing an essay in class on Wednesday)

EXH: Read and annotate Act IV of The Tempest

Due Tuesday, December 16
English 11 Alpha: spend 45 minutes drafting the second part of your Catcher essay (What does thinking about yourself in terms of this idea [the theme you have chosen] help you to understand about yourself at this stage in your life? Compose a meaningful, insightful thesis and develop it thoroughly via an introduction and body paragraphs. Use evidence and examples from your own life to support and illustrate your thoughts.) Add this work to your online draft.

English 11 Delta: rough draft of Holden portion of Catcher essay due at 8:25 am tomorrow via Googledocs (shared with nday@latinpcs.org). (20 HW points)

EXH: Finish reading and annotating Act III of The Tempest. Please come to class ready to be a little more focused and on point than today. Feel free to read ahead to finish the book before we go to the play on Wednesday.

Due Monday, December 15
AP and English 11 Alpha: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #11 (10 HW points)

AP: Complete Harriet Jacobs and WEB duBois sections of "Little" (apologies for the lack of page numbers; I don't have this book at home; find them in the table of contents). Check your answers, and make brief notes to yourself about how your thought process led you astray for items you answered incorrectly (or why you had to guess, if you had to guess and guessed wrong). I will likely not check this, but these assignments often will be in the future. Do this for the challenge, for the thrill of reading further important African-American writers, and for your success on the exam. Also, complete the "Ballot or the Bullet" worksheet we began in class.

English 11 Delta: Rough draft of Holden portion of Catcher essay due at 5 pm via Googledoc to nday@latinpcs.org. DO AT LEAST SOME OF THIS WORK OVER THE WEEKEND, AND PLAN AHEAD -- MONDAY WILL NOT BE A WORK DAY. (20 HW points)

EXH: Read and annotate Act III of The Tempest (eventual goal: five annotations per page)

Due Thursday, December 11
English 11 Alpha: Rough draft of Holden portion of essay due in Googledocs, shared with nday@latinpcs.org -- due at 5 pm (20 HW points) -- REVISED: THIS IS NOW DUE AT 8 AM ON FRIDAY

AP: Read and annotate the packet of texts (intro material, full text of speech, excerpt from alternative edition of the speech) for Malcolm X's "Ballot or the Bullet". Listen to the speech as well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRNciryImqg

English 11 Delta: Fine-tune your thesis statement for the Holden portion of the essay by following the directions at the bottom of the "thesis mini-workshop" handout. Complete your essay prospectus if you haven't yet (compose one or more possible thesis statements, explain why you think each of those is interesting (worth writing and reading about), and provide some examples of evidence you might use to support each) (Value: 10 HW points)

Due Wednesday, December 10
AP: Typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, and proofread second draft of Brutus Vs. Antony rhetorical analysis essay (Value: 30 major assignment points). Include appropriate citations for a Shakespearean text -- (3.2.215-220) for "Act 3, Scene 2, lines 215-220" for example.

EXH: Complete your reading and annotation of Act II of The Tempest

Due Tuesday, December 9

English 11 Alpha: Get caught up on your previous homework assignments (15 quotations on your theme in Catcher, essay prospectus -- see last week's HW assignments below). Fine-tune your thesis so that it is specific, insightful, and clear -- use the handout from today's class.

EXH: Read and annotate Act II of The Tempest (ultimate goal: 5 written notes per page). Review the goal you set after your last annotations, and try to accomplish it.

Due Monday, December 8
All classes: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #10

EXH: Re-read and re-annotate relevant parts of Act I (what you haven't read, what you haven't fully annotated yet); re-read 1.2.412-439 (Caliban, Miranda, and rape), 1.2.552-end (Ariel, Ferdinand, Miranda, and Prospero), and read several times the selection your group is working on

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Write a prospectus for the portion of your essay on Holden Caulfield -- compose one or more possible thesis statements, explain why you think each of those is interesting (worth writing and reading about), and provide some examples of evidence you might use to support each

AP: Construct 4 8.5x11" posters for our rhetorical devices word wall -- include the name of the device (big text), its definition (medium-sized text), and two examples (smaller text). Make sure that the name of the device, at the very least, is legible at a distance (it would be great if the definitions are too). 10 HW points for each.

For Thursday, December 4
AP: re-read 3.1.163-301, and 3.2.82-266 of Julius Caesar; think about what rhetorical categories (see the list in your writing notes from today's class) you will choose to focus on in your essay.

English 11 Alpha and Delta: pick the theme you will write about in your essay; find and write out 15 quotes from Catcher that pertain to your theme -- include page numbers so you can find them again later (15 HW points). This will take time, and it's a lot of work to do in one night, but it will be worth it in order to construct a solid and thoughtful thesis tomorrow in class.

For Wednesday, December 3
AP: Read and annotate the chapter on Rhetorical Analysis Essays in 5-5 Big (it's Ch. 5). Bring Big, Julius Caesar, EAA (Ch. on Rhetorical Analysis), and your rhetorical devices handout to class on Wednesday.

EXH: Re-read and annotate relevant parts of The Tempest, Act I (what your group might focus on, what you haven't read, what you haven't fully annotated yet)

English 11 Alpha: pick the theme you will write about in your essay; find and write out 15 quotes from Catcher that pertain to your theme -- include page numbers so you can find them again later (15 HW points)

English 11 Delta: Complete the DIY graphic organizer activity on the essay prompt (10 HW points)

For Tuesday, December 2
EXH: Read and annotate Act I of The Tempest, 5 written annotations per page (1 HW point per page). Please note that it is unlikely we will deal with any text after the end of Prospero's and Miranda's conversation before Wednesday, if you need to make decisions about what work to do and what not to do tonight.

English 11 Alpha: Complete DIY graphic organizer activity on essay prompt (10 HW points)

For Monday, December 1
All classes: Give thanks as appropriate. Be generous.

For Monday, November 24
EXH, English 11 Delta and Alpha: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #9

AP: Sentence Diagramming assessment Monday (complete Exercise #7a for extra practice if you wish)

EXH: Compose a 1-paragraph summary of today's discussion. Compose a second paragraph that further explores or analyzes an idea you found interesting or striking in today's discussion. Be thorough, thoughtful, and accurate. Value: up to 20 HW points, with discussion notes and prep notes

For Friday, November 21
EXH: See discussion preparation activity below.

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 5 of Everything's An Argument


English 11 Alpha: Re-re-read the last two chapters of Catcher. We'll be talking about Phoebe and the carousel tomorrow.

For Thursday, November 20
English 11 Alpha: Re-read and annotate the rest of Catcher.

AP: Find, write out, and label 20 examples of rhetorical devices in the funeral speeches in Julius Caesar. You may i.d. multiple devices within the same quotation. You may include up to 20 additional devices for up to 10 extra credit points (1/2 point per item).

English 11 Delta: You will find it worth your while to re-read the second-to-last chapter of Catcher.

For Wednesday, November 19
AP: Complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #7 (20 HW points) -- THIS IS STILL DUE WEDNESDAY, EVEN THOUGH I MADE NO MENTION OF IT IN CLASS ON MONDAY! PLEASE SEE ME (OR CHECK YOUR EMAIL) IF YOU STILL NEED A COPY OF THIS! Find, write out, and label 15 examples of rhetorical devices (whose definitions we've read so far) in Brutus' and Antony's speeches (you MAY use the same quotation more than once if it uses more than one device; you MAY use quotations from the speeches used as examples in your handlist (for reasons not clear to me, books of rhetorical devices are called "handlists")). Bring your copy of WLLP.

EXH: See below for the discussion preparation materials (I'm sorry it took so long to get these up here; I emailed them to you because the wiki was too slow to load at school):


English 11 Delta: Re-read and annotate the rest of Catcher.

For Tuesday, November 18
English 11: Write Phoebe's diary entry for the night Holden drops in. Pay attention to the sound of her voice in Ch. 20-23, and what we know about her character -- what would she write about, and how would she write it? (10 HW points for approximately 1 hand-written single-spaced page (double-spaced if typed))

EXH: Complete the Figurative Language Learning Stations (10 HW points) after reading over today's Figurative Language Notes sheet (taped into your Vocabulary Notes). Note: "Explain one of the examples" means to pick one of the examples and explain what it means; also, Sylvie figured out that the second-to-last example of synecdoche ("sin-EK-duh-kee" -- naming a part instead of the whole), and in some ways the last one too, is actually metonymy ("meh-TAWN-uh--mee" -- naming something associated with what you're talking about). If the note doesn't make sense, we can talk about it tomorrow.


For Monday, November 17
AP: Bring Words Like Loaded Pistols to class, having re-read pp. 49-52; re-read and re-annotate 3.2.13-49 and 3.2.82-266 in Julius Caesar

EXH: Typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, proofread, third ("final") draft of Holocaust Informative Essay due Monday with Works Cited page (and, hopefully, rubric and all prior drafts and notes).

English 11: Re-read and annotate Ch. 20-23 of Catcher

For Friday, November 14
English 11 Alpha, EXH: Sentence Diagramming Assessment on Friday. Be ready.

AP: Respond thoroughly and thoughtfully in writing to the following questions (10 HW points for completion):
1. In what ways is the Folger's production of Julius Caesar similar to the Mankiewicz film version?
2. In what ways is it different?
3. What aspects of the Folger's production looked or sounded as you had expected them to? How so?
4. What aspects were different from what you had expected? How so?
5. In what ways did each of the following characters seem sympathetic and/or unsympathetic to you as an audience member?
A. Brutus
B. Antony
C. Cassius
6. Comment thoughtfully on the women's roles in this production. (Were they sympathetic or unsympathetic? How so? Did they seem strong or weak as characters? How so?)


For Thursday, November 13
English 11 Alpha: Re-read and annotate the end of Ch. 16 (when Holden talks about and walks to the Natural History Museum); be ready to discuss Ch. 17-19 of Catcher; finish Sentence Diagramming Exercise #7
FYI: Mr. Day will be absent from class on Thursday due to a field trip for another class

English 11 Delta: Sentence Diagramming Assessment on Thursday. Be ready.

For Wednesday, November 12
AP: Re-read Act II and III summaries of Julius Caesar; read and annotate Act II, Scene 1, lines 1-61 and Act III, Scene 2 (all) and Scene 3 (all). View each of the following video clips:
Brutus' funeral speech (same film we watched today): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wM6X-8dokRE
Antony's funeral speech, part 1 (same film we watched today): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7X9C55TkUP8
Antony's funeral speech, entire (different film -- with Charlton Heston as Antony): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bi1PvXCbr8
Video trailer for the Folger's production: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNj2pY8_OZo
Note: a change has been made to our timetable on Thursday. We will have the opportunity to go out to lunch afterwards. If this interests you, please bring money for lunch. Also, please bring in your ticket money if you haven't yet.

EXH: 2nd draft of HIE due with Works Cited page (20 HW points for draft, 20 for complete WC page); finish sentence diagramming exercise #7 (20 HW points)

English 11 Delta: Re-read and annotate the end of Ch. 16 (when Holden talks about and walks to the Natural History Museum); be ready to discuss Ch. 17-19 of Catcher; complete any 4 sentences on Sentence Diagramming Exercise #7

For Tuesday, November 11
English 11 Alpha and Delta: Read and annotate Ch. 17-19 of Catcher

For Monday, November 10
All classes: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #6 (20 HW points)

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Re-read and annotate Ch. 13-16 of Catcher. You will receive 10 HW points for bringing your book (or a copy of the book) to class (5 points for this for Delta).

AP: Read the rest of the scene summaries for Julius Caesar. Score your answers on the multiple choice section of the diagnostic master exam, and review the answer explanations (p. 62-65 in Big). For each item you did not answer correctly, reflect on your thinking using the answer explanations, and write on your score sheet a brief explanation (1-2 sentences) as to how you think you led yourself to select an incorrect answer. Do this for each and every one of the questions you did not answer correctly.

EXH: Revise your essay, focusing on its content and structure (use the prompt to guide you). Second draft due Tuesday (value tbd).

For Friday, November 7
EXH: Rough draft of Holocaust Informative Essay due (40 HW points)

English 11 Alpha: Re-read and annotate Ch. 8-12 of Catcher. You will receive 10 HW points for bringing your book (or a copy of the book) to class.

AP: Complete the multiple choice section of the diagnostic/master exam in 5-->5 Big (beginning on p. 50). Follow the directions on p. 49 (28 HW points)

For Thursday, November 6
English 11 Delta: re-read and annotate Ch. 8-12 of Catcher. Here are some notes from today's class:
Why would Holden admit that "I'm the most terrific liar"?
--He's being honest now, though he wasn't before
--He's not truthful with others but he is with us/his therapist (Why? --b/c we don't know him? --to start over? --to figure out who we are?)
--Must not be to get something, because telling us would work against this, so maybe he's lying for another reason:
--------because he's a private person?
--------to feel better?
--------because there are no consequences? (but then again, why lie and not tell the truth?)

English 11 Alpha: re-re-read the following sections of Catcher: p. 5 and following page or two, p. 10 and following page or two, p. 26 and following page or two, p. 35 and following page or two, p. 43 and following page or two (these are the page numbers for the events we picked today)

AP:
1. Pick 5 controversial issues. For each, construct 3 possible poll questions -- 1 that would skew responses to one side of the issue, 1 to skew them to the other, and 1 that is neutral. (Example: One side -- Should dangerous firearms be allowed into places full of children who could be potentially injured? Other side -- Should people be allowed to exercise all of their constitutional rights in public spaces? Neutral -- should people be allowed to carry guns in city playgrounds?)
2. Read the eyewitnesstohistory.com entry for "assassination of Julius Caesar." Then read it again. http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/caesar2.htm

For Wednesday, November 5
AP: Bring "Logos" chapter of EAA, in 5-->5 Big (Hereafter "big"), read p. 17-49 -- come to class Wednesday prepared to ask any questions you may have about these two chapters

English 11 Delta: no new homework (SDE 6 due Monday); we will continue our conversation about Holden -- p. 19 ("I'm the most terrific liar..."), p. 26 ("This is a people-shooting hat..."), and the idea of Holden's (and everyone's) inconsistency on Wednesday

EXH: Re-read notes and annotations on Night in preparation for tomorrow's discussion

For Tuesday, November 4
English 11 Alpha: Read and annotate pp. 1-52 of Catcher (come prepared to point us to moments and events that will help us talk about the categories for describing a person we came up with in class today)

English 11 Delta: Re-re-read and annotate the following pages/sections of Catcher:
p. 35-40 -- Stradlater is going out with Jean; Holden tells him about his history with her
p. 40-44 -- Holden writes the composition about Allie’s baseball glove for Stradlater; Stradlater throws it away
Ch. 2 Holden goes to visit Mr. Spencer
p. 45 -- Physical description of Ackley (pimples, teeth)
Remember that our goal is to talk about the following: Holden's background, family, attitude (what is it? where does it come from?), how he reacts to problems, relationships with people, disposition (attitude towards life in general), how nice he is to people (does he follow the Golden Rule?)

For Monday, November 3
All classes: complete Sentence Diagramming Exercise #5

English 11 Alpha, Delta: Finish and hand in your Venn Diagram assignment ASAP, if you have not done so already. Bring your copy of The Catcher in the Rye to our next class.

English 11 Delta: Re-read pp. 1-52 of Catcher; come to class prepared to talk about sections of text that you think are most revealing about Holden's character

EXH: Complete notes tables/graphic organizers for each paragraph you plan to write for your HIE; conduct any research you need to to fill in gaps in your knowledge (suggested source: the USHMM website)

AP: Remember to find time in Mr. Day's room to finish the 2014 synthesis essay.

For Thursday, October 30
English 11 Delta: Finish Venn Diagram project ASAP, if not done today; bring Catcher (!) to class tomorrow

EXH: Complete notes tables/graphic organizers for each paragraph you plan to write for your HIE; conduct any research you need to to fill in gaps in your knowledge (suggested source: the USHMM website)

AP: read pp. xiii-13 and 107-121 in the Five Steps to a Five big book; read the evaluation rubric for the 2014 synthesis essay; finish reading the Q+A for the 2014 synthesis essay; finish your Cornell notes for Ch. 4 of EAA if you have not already (and remember on your own to turn them in!)

For Wednesday, October 29
AP: Construct your own set of Cornell notes for Ch. 5 of EAA (do not neglect the left-hand side!)

EXH: read and annotate the selections from Elie Wiesel's Maus you received today.

English 11 Alpha: compete sentence diagramming exercise #5 for Monday; do what you need to do to be ready to finish your Venn diagram by the end of our next meeting

For Tuesday, October 28
English 11 Alpha and Delta: What do you (each person in your group) need to do to be able to finish your Venn diagram by the end of class on Wednesday (Delta) / Thursday (Alpha)?

EXH: Read and annotate the rest of Maus (re-read if you have done this already).
For Monday, October 27
English 11 Alpha and Delta, AP, EXH: Sentence Diagramming Exercise #4, homework side (10 HW points)

EXH: Write 1 paragraph summarizing the ideas discussed in today's conversation; write another explicating Pavel's comment at the top of the discussion sheet ("Maybe your father needed...")

AP: Complete in writing #1 on p. 93 of EAA (10 HW points for thoughtful completion)

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Off the top of your head, construct a rough draft of the Venn diagram (do as much as you can by being thoughtful) (10 HW points); for Thoreau, for X, and for King -- again off the top of your head, make lists of their values, actions, thoughts, characteristics, and audiences (do your best off the top of your head) (10 HW points)

For Friday, October 24
EXH: Read and annotate pp. 234-260 of Maus, and prepare for tomorrow's Socratic discussion -- see attached:

English 11 Alpha: bring "Civil Disobedience" text, "The Ballot or the Bullet" text, "Letter from Birmingham Jail" text, and "Civil Disobedience" reading questions to class tomorrow

AP: Read and annotate Ch. 4 of Everything's An Argument

For Thursday, October 23
AP: Finish the Cornell notes for Ch. 3 of EAA on your own -- 10 HW points (we'll review them in class tomorrow)

English 11 Delta: bring "Civil Disobedience" text, "The Ballot or the Bullet" text, "Letter from Birmingham Jail" text, and "Civil Disobedience" reading questions to class tomorrow

For Wednesday, October 22
AP: Bring in, on paper, 3 arguments that rely primarily or exclusively on ethos (10 HW points)

EXH: Read and annotate through p. 234 of Maus

For Tuesday, October 21
EXH: (Re-?)read and annotate pp. 163-207 of Maus. Come to class prepared to write about and discuss the ways Maus II is also a story about Artie writing the book we're reading, and his feelings about writing the book (in other words, how this text is self-reflexive).

English 11 Alpha and Delta: finish reading and annotating Civil Disobedience. Finish the reading questions packet.

For Monday, October 20
AP: Complete in writing #1 on p. 67 of EAA (10 HW points)

EXH: Make two lists of words and phrases to describe Vladek -- 1 in the "present," 1 during the Holocaust. Include page references. 10 items total = 10 HW points.

English 11: Read and annotate through p. 5 of "Civil Disobedience," and answer the appropriate reading questions.

For Friday, October 17
AP: Read and annotate Ch. 3 of Everything's An Argument

EXH: Compose your own "cinematography" analysis of the panels on one page of Maus (think about focus, angle, perspective... -- you do not need to discuss each of these things in turn, as we did today in class, but use this vocabulary to discuss the composition and effect of each panel) (10 HW points)

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Complete Sentence Clarity worksheet #2

For Thursday, October 16
AP: No homework

English 11: Read and annotate through p. 3 of "Civil Disobedience," and answer the appropriate reading questions

EXH: Read and annotate through p. 161 of Maus

For Tuesday, October 14
English 11, AP, EXH: Sentence Diagramming Worksheet #3 (10 HW points for thoughtful completion).

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Write a paragraph on the back of the Socratic discussion handout, addressing these questions -- Do we always listen to our conscience? Why do we when we do, and why don't we when we don't? Should we always listen to our conscience? Why or why not? (10 HW points).

For Friday, October 10
EXH: read (and annotate) through p. 129 of Maus.

For Thursday, October 9

English 11 Alpha: Scan through the rest of "Civil Disobedience," circling or highlighting words you do not not. Email Mr. Day with the list of words from the text that you do not know (10 HW points).

For Wednesday, October 8
English 11 Delta and Alpha: Scan through the rest of "Civil Disobedience," circling or highlighting words you do not not. Email Mr. Day with the list of words from the text that you do not know (10 HW points). If you are in Delta period and did not submit your "Letter from Birmingham Jail" questions today, please remember to do so tomorrow. Alpha period: today's sentence diagramming sheet is due next Tuesday.

AP: Read and annotate pp. 1-7, 33-37 of Everything's An Argument. Be prepared to discuss p. 6. Complete in writing #1, 4, and 6 on pp. 36-37 (10 HW points for completion).

For Tuesday, October 7
EXH: revised, typed, double-spaced, edited, and proofread second (final) draft of Friday's writing exercise (re-writing a passage from Maus as a novel).

English 11 Alpha and Delta: Precis assignment due (up to 30 major assignment points)

For Monday, October 6
EXH, English 11 Alpha and Delta, and AP: Sentence Diagramming Worksheet #2 (10 HW points)

EXH: Gallery walk will be collected in class on Monday.

For Friday, October 3
EXH: read and annotate through p. 84 of Maus. Note: I will be absent tomorrow, because of the college fair. The substitute will have a writing prompt for you to work on (Happy Friday!). A revised, typed, double-spaced, edited, and proofread second (final) draft will be due Tuesday. Theoretically, today's substitute collected the Gallery Walk assignment in class today.

AP: re-read and annotate pp. 221-224 of Words Like Loaded Pistols. Watch the following video clip (apologies for the lack of synchronization between audio and video): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_frM44bBMfA. Here's some context. Tom Cruise (look how young he is!) is the defense lawyer for two Marines who have been accused of accidentally murdering a comrade who died while they were giving him a "Code Red" (an illegal physical beating for poor performance of duty). Lt. Kaffee (Cruise) has called the soldiers' commanding officer, Colonel Jessep (Jack Nicholson), to the witness stand because he believes that Jessep ordered the beating. If Jessep did order the beating of one of his men, then the other soldiers would be exonerated, because they were following his orders, and Jessep would be arrested (this is what a 39A session is). If you want to see what happens next, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRdTetA_Dqo&spfreload=1. One of the cool things here is that Kaffee uses Jessep's disdain for him (he's in the Navy, not the Marines; he works in an office, rather than a combat post; he's young) jujitsu style, to provoke Jessep into proudly and angrily telling the truth because he thinks Kaffee has no business questioning him. (Jujitsu is a martial art that specializes in teaching people how to turn their opponents' superior strength and power against them.)

English 11 Alpha: revise any 10 sentences on the Sentence Clarity worksheet you received today. You may add or cut words and punctuation, correct grammar, break sentences into 2-3 new sentences... anything to make the sentences you choose more clear in meaning without changing that meaning.

For Thursday, October 2
AP: Complete Lou Gehrig speech and worksheet (20 HW points for completion)

English 11 Delta: Revise any 10 sentences on the sentence clarity worksheet (10 HW points for thoughtful completion)

For Wednesday, October 1
AP: Orwell reading questions and essay due Wednesday

For Tuesday, September 30
English 11:
Alpha -- read and annotate through p. 7 of "Letter from Birmingham Jail;" answer reading questions through #21
Delta -- read and annotate through p. 10 of "Letter from Birmingham Jail;" answer reading questions through #27

EXH: Complete Holocaust Gallery Walk questions in writing (okay, it's not really a gallery walk if you're sitting at a computer). Note that the Gallery Walk materials proper begin on p. 8 of the linked file; the first 7 are background and additional information. ADDITIONAL NOTE: you may take until Wednesday on this if you wish, though there may be additional homework Tuesday night.

And here it is in MS Word form, if the other one is too big or inaccessible:


For Monday, September 29

Eng. 11 Alpha and Delta: Complete #1-3 (plus the bonus sentences, if you wish) on the HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1 (10 HW points for thoughtful completion);
--Delta: read and annotate through the middle of p. 7 in "Letter from Birmingham Jail," and answer the reading questions through #21.
--Alpha: read and annotate through the 4th paragraph of p. 5 in "Letter from Birmingham Jail," and answer the reading questions through #15

AP: finish the sentence diagramming worksheet (complete any three sentences on the homework side); re-read and annotate pp. 45-71 in Words Like Loaded Pistols.

EXH: Write one more paragraph (or more than one) to add to your discussion prep and reflection paragraphs from this week. Lay out your own moral position, using the vocabulary we've developed for discussing moral philosophy this week. Explain how you can cope with the problems we have encountered in the position you advocate or construct for yourself. Be thorough, thoughtful, and accurate. (Value: 20 HW points, graded, plus 10 HW points for each of the discussion prep paragraphs).

For Friday, September 26

AP: NOTE THE CHANGES FROM WHAT WAS ANNOUNCED IN CLASS TODAY! Complete #1-3 (plus the bonus sentences, if you wish) on the HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1 (10 HW points for thoughtful completion) FOR MONDAY. FOR TOMORROW (FRIDAY), read the essay prompt you received today carefully and thoughtfully, make notes, plan your essay and what quotations from 1984 and "Politics and the English Language" you will use, and come to class tomorrow ready to draft an essay that will be DUE AT THE END OF CLASS TOMORROW. Here is the prompt again:


EXH: Complete #1-3 (plus the bonus sentences, if you wish) on the HW side of Sentence Diagramming Exercise #1 (10 HW points for thoughtful completion); re-read pp. 138-141, 157-160, 168-170, 173-200 of The Book Thief -- come to class ready to discuss or write about Hans Hubermann's morality

For Thursday, September 25
Eng. 11 Delta: Read and annotate "Letter from Birmingham Jail" pp. 4-5 (1st four paragraphs of p. 5 only); answer questions #8-15 in the reading questions packet (sentence diagramming worksheet due Monday)

AP: Re-read and annotate pp. 8-10 of "Politics and the English Language," and answer reading questions #18-23 in writing

English 11 Alpha: read and annotate "Letter from Birmingham Jail," p. 1-2.5, and answer questions #1-6 in the reading question packet.

For Wednesday, September 24
AP: Re-read p. 6-8 (middle of p. 8) of "Politics and the English Language"; re-view, re-consider, and re-vise reading questions #13-18

English 11: read and annotate "Letter from Birmingham Jail," p. 1-2.5, and answer questions #1-6 in the reading question packet

EXH: Add to the writing you've been doing, laying out (describing) and evaluating (assessing the strengths and weaknesses) of moral relativism

For Tuesday, September 23
English 11: read the complete wikipedia entry on King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" (it's shorter than you would expect), and come to class tomorrow prepared to answer questions about the information it contains

EXH: Add to your writing from the weekend -- summarize today's discussion in a paragraph (Value: 10 HW points)

For Monday, September 22
English 11: Typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, and proofread 2nd ("final") draft of essay due Monday (up to 30 major assignment points).

AP: Re-read and re-view the text of "Politics and the English Language" relevant to reading questions #5-15 (bottom of p. 2-top of p. 7)

EXH: Compose a 1-paragraph summary of today's class conversation (10 HW points for completion)

For Friday, September 19
AP: read and annotate "Politics and the English Language"; answer on a separate sheet of paper each of the reading questions you received today

English 11 Alpha: "Test" on "The Ballot or the Bullet" due tomorrow (up to 22 major assignment points)

For Thursday, September 18
AP: read and annotate pp. 260-265 of 1984, and the excerpt from the wikipedia entry on Orwell's "Politics and the English Language"

EXH: typed, double-spaced, revised, edited, and proofread essay with Works Cited entry/entries (if you refer to multiple texts) due Friday

English 11 Delta: complete the open-book, open-note, open-to-work-on-with-other-people-provided-you're-not-just-copying-answers test on "The Ballot or the Bullet" (up to 2 MA points per item)

For Wednesday, September 17

AP: On a piece of paper, explain in writing Winston's statement that "Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows" (10 HW points for completion).

EXH: revised, typed, clean second draft of The Book Thief/Power of Words essay due Wednesday (20 HW points)

English 11: Re-read the addendum at the end of your "The Ballot or the Bullet" packet from the Cleveland version of the speech. Come to class ready to answer these questions as warm-ups:
1. Why is a police officer who strikes a demonstrator breaking the law, according to Malcolm X?
2. Under what circumstances does Malcolm X believe the use of violence is acceptable?
3. Would you say X is arguing for the use of violence? Why or why not?

For Tuesday, September 16
EXH: Rough draft of all three parts of Friday's essay (30 HW points)

English 11 Alpha: Come to class ready to discuss why Malcolm X is upset with the Democratic Party (review the relevant text of "The Ballot or the Bullet")

English 11 Delta: Listen to and read along with the next 12 minutes or so of "The Ballot or the Bullet," from 19:17 in to 32:51: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRNciryImqg; come to class ready to discuss why Malcolm X is upset with the Democratic Party.

For Monday, September 15
English 11 Alpha: Write a definition of black nationalism (your words, a paraphrase of X's, or a quotation from his speech), list 5 possible advantages of black nationalism, and 5 possible disadvantages of black nationalism (value: 12 HW points for completion)

AP: Write a paragraph summarizing the ways in which issues that likely concerned Orwell in writing 1984 appear in our society today. Be thorough, thoughtful, and accurate (value: up to 20 HW points -- graded).

For Friday, September 12
EXH: Complete the new graphic organizer for figurative language analysis, reading p. 262-263 of The Book Thief (Liesel and the mayor's wife).

English 11 (Alpha for 9/12, Delta for 9/15): See previous entry

AP: Make some notes: what parallels do you see between our society (and the one Orwell lived in) and the society of Oceania in 1984?

For Thursday, September 11
English 11 (Delta): Read and annotate non-italicized portions of "The Ballot or the Bullet." Be prepared to 1) Define black nationalism, 2) explain why X is upset with the Democratic party, 3) explain when and why X thinks the use of violence is acceptable.
Some vital notes: Malcolm X gave versions of this speech on several occasions in the spring of 1964, after the assassination of President Kennedy (whereupon Lyndon Baines Johnson became president), after the Civil Rights Act (which would make racial discrimination explicitly illegal) had been passed by the US House of Representatives, but before it had been passed by the US Senate. Passage in the Senate was held up by so-called "Dixiecrat" senators -- white, conservative, Southern Democrats (many of whom would switch to the Republican party in the following years, helping make it the socially conservative party we know today).

EXH: Complete the new graphic organizer for figurative language analysis, reading p. 262-263 of The Book Thief (Liesel and the mayor's wife).

AP: re-read pp. 184-top of 218 of 1984 (sections we may talk about tomorrow include this, p. 69-81, and p. 149-167)

For Wednesday, September 10
English 11: On a piece of paper, list 10 significant events in The Catcher in the Rye (10 HW points). Read and annotate the background reading handout on Malcolm X's speech The Ballot or the Bullet. (These are for Thursday for Alpha; Wednesday for Delta.)

EXH: Draft practice figurative language analysis paragraph (10 HW points for completion) Expanded directions: You are writing a paragraph analyzing Marcus Zusak's use of figurative language in the passage we've been looking at (What is his overall purpose in using it here?) By examining the far-right-hand column on our graphic organizer for patterns, you can write a 1-sentence answer to the question at the bottom of the sheet based on the pattern you find. This is the main idea sentence (thesis) for your paragraph.

For Tuesday, September 9
English 11: Closely read the wikipedia entry for Malcolm X's speech "The Ballot or the Bullet": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ballot_or_the_Bullet

EXH: Re-read and annotate the description of Frau Diller's (not Holtzapfel's) candy shop in The Book Thief (start near the bottom of p. 49).

AP: Re-read and annotate pp. 69-81 and 149-167 of 1984.

For Monday, September 8
English 11: Read and annotate the article on structural racism in Ferguson that you received yesterday. Be prepared to answer questions about it in class on Monday.

AP: "You can only think and feel things you have words for" -- support, refute, or qualify this statement, in writing (10 HW points)

EXH: In one or more paragraphs, compose a narrative of the ideas discussed in class today (what they were, evidence for and against each, their implications, etc.); in one or more paragraphs, pick up at least one idea you found interesting and worthy of further pursuit -- explain its significance in your own words, and elaborate on it, work out its implications, and/or explain its connection to your own life.

For Friday, September 5
EXH: Write 3/4-2 pages total: 1) To what extent is a person's identity something they construct and create themselves? 2) To what extent is a person's identity made or placed on them by others? Draw on Arnold Spirit, Jr.'s experience, your own, and other books you've read in your response (20 HW points). Bring Absolutely True Diary... on Friday -- we will use it as the primary text in discussion.

Eng 11 (Alpha and Delta): Read and annotate the article on structural racism in Ferguson. Be prepared to answer questions about it in class on Friday (Alpha) or Monday (Delta).

AP: Re-read and annotate pp. 26 (middle) - 60 (top) of 1984.

For Thursday, September 4
Delta: Read the article you selected in class today -- identify events missing from the timeline we've been constructing (check your notes), and whether these events are established facts or assertions. In the case of assertions, identify who is making each. Would you like 10 HW points for this?

AP: Come to class tomorrow prepared for a test-like assessment on 1984 (it will be open book -- bring the book). Review our past couple of lessons: explain, using the language of cause and effect and rhetoric and argument, how the militarization of local police likely exacerbated recent social and political unrest in Ferguson, MO (20 HW points).

For Wednesday, September 3
All: Works Cited exercise (15 HW points); Summer Choice Reading Assessment (20 HW or Major Assignment points)

For Friday, August 29
All: in-class assessment on choice summer reading

For Thursday, August 28
All: bring notebook/binder on Thursday; Signature sheet from first day letter and syllabus due Thursday (10 HW points)
EXH: "I Hear My Neighborhood Singing" poem due
AP: Find, read, print out, and bring in a news article/editorial/essay that makes an argument about recent events in Ferguson, MO (10 HW points). Bring 1984 to class. Read and come to class prepared to discuss the article linked to below (I will have paper copies in class, but please read this ahead of time):
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2014/08/police_in_ferguson_military_weapons_threaten_protesters.html
English 11: Bring Catcher in the Rye

Due Wednesday August 27
EXH: Bring Absolutely True Diary... to class
Eng 11: Read (and annotate/highlight, if you wish) the NPR article from Ferguson; bring Catcher tomorrow... (possible in-class assessment)
AP: Bring 1984 tomorrow. Look at the two images on the wiki. Answer the following questions in writing on a separate piece of paper (10 HW points): What is the message each is sending? (What is the argument each is trying to make?) How can you tell?
carl_winslow_in_uniform.jpg

Police Shooting Misso_Schu(32).jpg

Due Tuesday August 26
All: Bring required summer reading books tomorrow.
AP: Print out two news articles that use identical facts or data to support different or opposed claims or conclusions
Eng 11: Print out an article about the protests and police shooting in Ferguson, MO. Highlight facts in one color, and opinions in another
EXH (English 10 Honors, get it?): Complete "Asphodel" assignment